Question about Bushnell NorthStar 78-8846 (675 x 114mm) Telescope

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Dot in view

We have a Bushnell 78-8846 North star telescope. We are now seeing a black dot and a straight line to one side when looking through the telescope. How do we fix this problem? The Bushnell manual has no info.

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  • paul893 May 11, 2010

    ????? I am having the same problem. The eyepiece I am using is 22 mm focal lengh?????

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  • 15 Answers

Sounds like a collimation problem!! do you know how to collimate the optics?

Posted on Nov 05, 2009

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