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I have baseboard electric heat. My units are 27 years old. I'd like to replace with more efficient units but can't find any comparitive data.

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Hummm, well, the newer units are trying to meet or exceed energy standards, so good on you for updating. You can look at Consumer Reports data to see which is best, but this method of heat does not lend itself to the same refinements as a gas furnace, for example.
I prefer units that have oil, or fans. The oil filled gives heat without having the heating element energized.
The fan units heat the room much better, but this is often NOT an option on baseboards, as many are wall cavity types.
220 volt costs less to run than 110 volt models, but this also is not something easily changed at this stage....

Posted on Oct 13, 2010

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I am getting ready to buy baseboard heat for a 800-900 squarefoor open area, old GArage, And I am looking at 3 8' 2500W sections of base board. is this enough. And How much better is the units you have...


First, those of us on FixYa don't sell any products or appliances. Just information.

But to answer your question about electric baseboard heating ... It's the most inefficient and costly heating source you could use. With that said, a lot depends on the cubic footage of the area, as well as how well that area is insulated. This applies for electric, gas or oil heating. You rae not just heating square footage, you're wanting to heat cubic footage (i.e. Width x Length x Height = Cubic Footage). Assuming you have an 8 ft ceiling, the Cubic Footage would be (assuming a 9 ft ceiling) 7200 Cubic Feet. Based on that and if it was my home, I'd be installing a 20,000 - 25,000 Btu Vent-free (Flue-Less) Gas Heater, with built-in thermostat control. It could either be as a Free Standing, Vent-free Gas Fireplace System or simply a Wall Mounted Heater. One is decorative, as well as efficient and the other is simple and efficient. Plus, gas heat is a warm, moist heat that you feel very quickly and it's more comfortable than electric or oil heat. As a matter of fact, Vent-free Gas Heating Appliances are 99.9% efficient. And will work without electricity. Which is great during a Winter power outage. If you currently don't have Natural Gas at your home, then LPG (Liquid Propane Gas) is readily available.

So, by now, you figured out that my preference is gas. I have three Vent-free gas heating appliances in my 3000 square foot home (2-Vent-free Remote Controlled Gas Log Sets in existing wood burning fireplaces & a Vent-free heater in my 2-car garage). Our primary heat source is an electric heat pump. Which doesn't work well, when the temperature reach 32 degrees F or lower. We use the gas heaters only as a supplement heat source or as primary source, if the power goes out.

I hope you'll take a little time to research this, because in the long run, it can save you $$$. Below, is a link to Empire Comfort Systems. They have excellent supplemental and primary heating products in all looks, shapes and sizes. This will give you an idea of what's out there.

http://www.empirecomfort.com/corporate/


I hope all of this helped you. Please let me know. Thanks.

Jun 13, 2011 | Fahrenheat F25426 Electric Baseboard...

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Home Electric Heat Heating and Electric


Electric heat can come in many different forms. Some of these methods are resistance heating, electric arc heating, induction heating, and dielectric heating. The most common of these is the resistance heating. With the resistance heating of electric baseboard heating, water heating and kitchen ranges, you don't have to worry about carbon monoxide or unvented gases. However, direct with electric is really not considered ecologically sound because most electricity uses fossil fuels. This is because about two-thirds of the energy of the fuel is lost within the power stations, and in transmission line losses.

Some of the most popular choices for electric heating systems are thermal storage systems, electric radiant heating, hydronic electric heating and even convective heating. You can also install an off-peak system that can save money and also give you the convenience of electric heat. An example of an off-peak electric heating system that is very common today is an electric plenum heater. Another newer form of heating is a convective electric heating system. Both use electric heaters to heat the air that is then circulated with blowers throughout your home.

Electric heating has several unique advantages. It can be precisely controlled to allow a uniformity of temperature within very narrow limits, it is cleaner than many other methods of heating. It does not involve any combustion and it is considered very safe because it is protected from overloading by automatic breakers. It is quick to use easy to adjust and it is relatively quiet. The main disadvantages of electric heating in industry are the higher cost of electrical energy compared to direct use of fuel, and the capital cost of both the electric heating unit itself and the electrical wiring required to deliver large quantities of electrical energy to the point of use.
Electric heat does have a place. One place where it does shine is in a seasonal cottage that will only be used a few times a year. It is very easy to shut down the heat and turn it back on when you get back there. There is also very little that can go wrong or go bad from the long periods of non-use. For this situation electric is a very good choice. This is really the only situation in which I recommend electric heating.

As you can easily see, electric heating has some advantages and some disadvantages. The cost of electricity has continued to rise and will be skyrocketing even higher in the future. Many states have or will be deregulated electric or are going to do so in the very near future. With the future uncertainty of the cost of electric and the great amount of waste in the transmission system of electric, many owners of electric heating systems are debating whether or not to convert to hydronic baseboard heating. With the super high efficiency of today's gas and oil boilers, they are quickly becoming much more attractive to many homeowners. Combining a high efficiency gas or oil boiler with hot water baseboard or radiant heating gives you great comfort and will give you low utility costs for many years to come.

on Dec 25, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

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Underfloor Radiant Heating for Your New Sunroom


You want to add a brand new sunroom onto your existing house. The problem is that you are not sure how to heat it. Electric heating with baseboard heaters will spoil the look that you want from your new room. Hot water baseboard is going to present all types of problems getting hooked in to the existing system and piping it. And, if you have hot air heating system then you will have the problem of getting ductwork to the room. There is another way to heat this room easily and efficiently.

Radiant heating has been one of the most comfortable and efficient ways for heating for many years. The problem has been in the past to find a good heating source for small radiant floors that will be affordable, effective and efficient.

This problem has been solved now, with the availability of small new electric combination heater- circulator units. These units use small electric heating elements together with a small circulator pump to give you a all in one heating source and circulator pump.

Now you just have to lay your tubing in the floor of the room you are adding on to your house. Then you run that tubing into your existing basement or other room in your house. The tubing and the electric are attached to the heating unit. Then, wire a thermostat to the unit, and you are now ready to make heat. This really makes heating a new addition room very inexpensive and easy to do.

The greatest thing about using this type of heating system is that most average do-it-yourself types can do this. All that is needed is a basic knowledge of plumbing and electric.
If you are thinking of building that little add-on and are worried about how you will heat it, think about using radiant floor heat and a small electric heater-circulator to do your project.

on Dec 05, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I would like to know how your new baseboard heaters compare with an old baseboard heater I need to replace. How much more energy effecientis your product than an old unit(s) my grandfather put into his...


Glenn, we don't sell anything on this site except ways to solve repair issues. You need to contact several dealers or manufacturers of electric baseboard heaters to answer your question intelligently. Researching online can be a great resource.

Certainly there will be some savings using today's models, but how much has a lot of variables. For example, you can have a 94% efficient furnace. But, if your home is not energy efficient, that 94% efficient furnace doesn't mean much.

Good luck to you. I hope I've headed you in the right direction.

Mar 08, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Doesn't heat up as first bought three years ago.


Not unless it leaks oil on the floor. The oil has nothing to do with heating, your unit is actually an electric heater with oil added as "thermal ballast."

The first suspect is the plug that you plug into the wall. These sometimes overheat and electrical continuity is lost.

Solution: new plug from the hardware store. Cut off the old one and take it with you so you can get something very similar. Don't do anything if you're not comfortable with handyman-level electrical repairs.

Next suspect is the cord itself. These have a hard life on electric heaters.

After that you're inside the unit. First suspect is the thermostat, since it's the only moving part. A burned out heating element, or a burned wire connection, is possible, but not the first thing to look for.

Generally, this kind of heater often lasts for years and years--and often doesn't. Once you're past replacing the plug it's not unlikely that repair will cost more than a new heater.

I'm not shilling for Home Ripoff, but they have a $60 "baseboard" (type) heater with remote control that I'm looking at, I've read good reviews about it. However look closely, it's very long, and sticks out from the baseboard more than you might expect.

Mar 28, 2010 | Pelonis Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

IS A HYDRONIC ELECTRIC BASEBOARD MORE EFFICENT THEN THE STANDARD ELECTRIC BASEBOARD HEATER


I have some confusion about what you are asking......

There is no such thing as "Hydronic Electric Baseboards"......

I am assuming you are referring to the oil filled baseboard heaters. If so....

The same amount of btu's required to heat a space remain the same whether the elements heat a liquid to warm the air or whether they heat the air directly, the same amount of wattage will be consumed. So, their is no more or less efficiency between the two.

If you are referring to "Hydronic Baseboard Heaters" (these baseboards are fed from a boiler with a pump) Then....I will assume that it is a gas boiler. In which case, the gas boiler would be more cost efficient to operate. If it is an electric the same rule applies as above......the cost is the same.

Oct 04, 2009 | Fahrenheat FBE15002 Baseboard Heater

2 Answers

I have electric baseboard heat that was throwing sparks and making a "burned bug smell". The unit in question is about 14 years old. The unit was "off".. It is summertime. I got up at 2 AM to use the...


No. The bugs caused a short inside the wiring. you nweed to pull it off and clean it out. Possibly mend wires. or replace the unit

Replacement isn't as expensive as your life. So My recommendation is just buy a new one.

Aug 23, 2009 | Electric TPI CORP TBS BASEBOARD HEATER...

1 Answer

Electric hydronic liquid-filled baseboard heaters


The same comparisons with other forms of electric heat (i.e., radiant, electric strip baseboard, etc.) are the same. The difference is cycle time - the liquid-filled electric heaters turn on and off less frequently than strip-type to maintain thermostat temperatures. This also means that the unit's temperature will swing more widely than the desired average thermostat setting (the liquid's temperature will signal the thermostat to turn off power, but the temperature will continue to climb; similarly the liquid will signal the thermostat that it is cool enough to engage power but the liquid will continue to cool after power is engaged - similar temp swings with hygronic heating systems). Some say that the liquid-filled units are safer, but the manufacturer's installation guidance is usually the same between strip and liquid-filled so both pose an equal safety hazard.

Sep 21, 2008 | Fahrenheat PLF1504 Baseboard Heater

1 Answer

Low heat output


Hi,
first of all, have the thermostacts been checked,if not they will need to be checked,mainly dust can get into them.
if they have heating elements,ckeck to see if they are all in tact and have no dust on them.if this does not work then you will need new heating elements,which you might not get any more,if this is the case then im sorry to say that new heaters will be needed. i hope this helps and good luck.

Nov 21, 2007 | Fahrenheat Electric Convector Baseboard...

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