Question about 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide Ultra Classic

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Battery went dead while riding. changed regulator. charging now but stator wires getting hot is that normal?

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  • Master
  • 4,565 Answers

No this is NOT normal. This is an indication that you are drawing too much current for some reason or that you have a bad connection at the plug where the wires from the regulator plugs into the case. By stator wires, I'm assuming you are talking about the two wires that come from the engine case up to the voltage regulator. The stator is actually inside the primary and you can't get to those wires to feel how hot they are.

Good luck
Steve

Posted on Oct 08, 2010

  • corey6311 Oct 09, 2010

    yes it is the wires from the engine case . they get hot and then the regulator gets hot

  • wd4ity
    wd4ity Oct 09, 2010

    By hot, do you mean too hot to hold your hand on the wires or the regulator? Have you made any electrical additions to the bike? Have you changed the main breaker to a higher amperage? According to what I'm getting on this end, you bike is a "full dresser". These bike do require a large amount of current but everything was designed with this in mind at the factory. The regulator may get warm but shouldn't get hot.

    If you haven't changed the main circuit breaker, the current load on the bike should not be too high. If the current draw gets too high, the circuit breaker will trip. But, the circuit breaker is designed to protect the wiring harness like it is in any vehicle. If you add electrical devices to the bike to bring the current load up to just before the circuit breaker trips, you're running the bike on it's edge of burning the harness up. Everything electrical gets hot but mostly the stator. The stator is inside the primary where you can't get to it to see just how hot it is getting. I've seen hundreds of them that have run hot for so long that the enamel coating on the wires had become brittle and cracked resulting in a shorted stator.

    If you've added a lot of extra electrical equipment to your bike, you may wish to consider going to an aftermarket alternator system that has a higher current output. But, let's see how long this one last first. If you're not blowing fuses or tripping the main breaker, there's nothing I can tell you that is "wrong". Your bike simply has a lot of electrical equipment on it whether or not you've added anything.

    Good luck
    Steve

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2005 Honda CBF 500 ABS battery runs dead and the engine cut's off


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from the regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from the regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads for viewing or printing that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
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95 suzuki ls 650 - just got it on the road after it has been standing a long time in a garage. it was running fine for a week and then suddenly shorted (?) during parking it. brought it to my mechanic, who...


Hi, Sabine you either have a faulty battery a serious drain on your battery or your charging system has gone south, before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
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1 Answer

I was drving 2001 honda cbr929rr and idle sounded funny. when i went to start it after work..the battery was dead. i tried to push start it and made it almost all the way home. charged battery and it...


Hi, Djetude before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.fireblades.org/forums/honda-fireblade/83463-929-charging-problems.html
bike wont hold charge
2000 2001 Honda CBR929RR Fireblade Service Manual Moto Data Project
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2 Answers

I have a 98 Honda Shadow ACE VT750. The battery was replaced in May. I cannot get the battery to hold a charge. The starter fuse was just replaced. The bike will not start without jumper cables and...


Charge and load test the battery. If the battery sat dead for as little as two weeks , it could be sulfated and no good. If it is a Yuasa battery it only has a 6 month warranty , grab your receipt and race back to the dealer. They will charge and load test it three times . If it does not pass the load test you will get a new battery if it is still under warranty. Grab your voltmeter and unplug the plug with three yellow wires that is coming out of your stator. The three yellow wires coming from the stator should have continuity with each other and no continuity between any of the yellow wires and ground. That is the test for the stator. If the stator is good , the battery is good , then you probably have a bad regulator/rectifier. I suspect you just have a bad battery.

Nov 06, 2010 | 1999 Honda VT 750 CD Shadow A.C.E. Deluxe

1 Answer

Hi,I have a 1982 V45 sabre,the problem is the stator plug is getting really hot.checked the charging and it's between 13.2-13.9.is it normal for this plug to get hot?


Yes some heat is normal, not so hot that it melts. Your voltage from stator is AC not DC,the voltage you read was after voltage regulator.To check the stator output unhook the wires from stator,run engine at 1,500 rpms as you read Volts AC on your meter,read from one stator wire to the other (do not use black to ground) untill you have tested all the combinations,write down the different set of numbers.You should read around 45 or 50 volts AC on each set. The high temp on the wire is more likely the result of wire connections needing to be cleaned and treated with dielectric grease to keep out moisture and deture corrosion.With good clean contact the wire will have less resistance and be cooler.The hot spot is usualy the weakest. OK well hope you get it done soon,Ride safe!

Apr 08, 2010 | 1982 Honda VF 750 S

2 Answers

I have a 2000 fatboy stopped to get gas battery was dead charge battery went bought new battery after 1 hr of riding battery was dead again is this a voltage regulator or a stator problem how do I check


Hi,
To check if you got a charging fault, get a multimeter and switch to voltage put across the battery. You should be getting at least 13.4 volts.
Turn lights on and this should fluctuate upwards. If your getting anything lower then what I stated you have a charging problem. Rectifiers and regulators can only really be tested of the bike with a specific tester. Hope this helps, let me know how you get on.

Jason

Apr 05, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTF Fat boy

2 Answers

Harley Davidson battery went dead after riding 20 miles during the day. I rode my Harley Dyna Super Glide (2002) about 10 miles, made a stop and then rode 10 miles back. I stopped to get gas about 1 mile...


1.What?

2.What?
You charged the battery off of the battery charger with a trickle charge. The battery wouldn't charge while you're riding, because your alternator took a cr@p.
(Sorry if I seem gruff, but I'm an old biker, and Harleys are all I ride. I'm also a Harley mechanic.
Shhhh! I don't want that to get around! lol!)

3.Battery is at 13.4 volts now? What is the specific gravity of the acid in each cell? Don't have a hydrometer? Do you have a load tester? No? Since you measured the voltage, do you have a multimeter?

Test the voltage with the bike running. It should be around 14.6 volts when charging, less with the battery fully charged.
Don't get the correct reading, then you better look at alternator replacement. (Regulator is built in)

Jul 13, 2009 | 2002 Harley Davidson FXD Dyna Super Glide

1 Answer

Charging problem


more than likely it is the regulator rectifer yes the some times charge to high but not always that is the best bet the origanal stator sounded like it was fine the regulatetors are trickey to test because there are so many power sources on your bike lights,display sensors so on the regulator will more than likley fix your problem

Jun 25, 2009 | 2001 Yamaha V Star 1100 Classic

1 Answer

Overcharging battery!?


If it goes over 17 then there is definitely a regulator fault, regardless of what the stator is doing. The very purpose of the regulator (it 'regulates' the voltage within limits) is to NOT allow the output dc voltage to climb when the stator output rises (normal) with increased engine rpm. In other words - by nature of way it works normally, the stator AC output Voltage will rise as the engine rpm increases - it will continue to rise all the way to peak engine rpm. The Rectifier/ regulator with its double-barrel name performs two functions: the first - rectifier - converts the AC output of the Stator to DC volts - if 'UN-regulated' the DC volts would also climb proportionally to engine rpm. But that is where the second function of the Rectifier/Regulator - the Regulator - comes in. The Regulator's job is to stop the voltage rising over a certain threshold even if the stator is trying to drive it higher. It does this by 'shunting' current to ground (short circuit effectively) in a series of pulses; this controlled operation is called regulation. The limit is going to be 15V absolute max and more typically 14.5 or so. If the output rises about this value then it absolutely is NOT regulating. Failures of the regulator where they simply don't regulate and allow full voltage to pass are rare (but not impossible) - much more likely to be short or open circuit, neither or which would give the symptom you have. It still sounds almost like you maybe wired it incorrectly? The stator is inside the left crancase cover - whether or not it has its own problems, have nothing to do with the lack of regulation causing battery volts to go to 17V.

Nov 10, 2008 | 2006 Triumph Daytona 955i

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