Kenmore Dryers - Answered Questions & Fixed Issues


Is the door interlock working properly ...........

Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Nov 11, 2020 | 12 views


I have no experience of this but taking a flying guess - the moist air being expelled from the dryer is condensing inside the vent hose and probably running back into the dryer.

To avoid complex solutions the vent hose should ideally be travelling downhill to the vent.

If it is impossible to change the geography an improvement might be made by insulating the hose and vent, fitting a water trap/drain and raising the ambient temperature the dryer is operating in.

Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Nov 06, 2020 | 128 views


Inadequate airflow can cause overheating. Make sure you have adequate space around the dryer (see owner's manual) so air can get in. Verify that the duct between the heater and the drum is clean, especially right at the holes in the back of the drum. I often find clumps of charred lint here; it gets pulled in from outside of the dryer, or from leaky ducts inside the dryer. Clean out the path between the drum and the lint trap, and the duct from the trap to the blower. Also, check the path from the blower outlet to the outside exhaust. Even with the lint trap, an amazing amount of stuff can build up in there. Sometimes the exhaust duct gets blocked by plants, dead animals, or nests (wasp nests are especially nasty).

If you have a poor connection to the high-temperature cutout, the connection itself can get hot enough to blow it. Generally this is easily visible as burned insulation on the wire at the connector, and a heavily oxidized connector. If this is the case, get a high-temperature replacement slip-on connector, and strip the wire back to good insulation to install the new connector.

If all of that is clear, the auto-sensing (low temperature) thermostat may have welded contacts. My favorite way to test for that is to remove it from the dryer and put it in an electric skillet (connections facing upward!), turn the skillet temperature to a few degrees above the trip point temperature, then measure continuity on the thermostat when it's hot to make sure it opens (if the indicator on the skillet control is working, that will tell you when to do the test). Just be sure you don't melt your meter's test leads or burn your fingers on the skillet or thermostat. If the thermostat still has continuity when it's heated above the trip point, replace it.

Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Sep 11, 2020 | 13 views


The dryer was probably manufactured in November 1999, according to http://www.appliance411.com/service/date-code.php . The serial number's J translates to the manufacturing year. The subsequent 45 indicates the unit was built in the 45th week of 1999. The copyright date for the manual is 2000, https://c.searspartsdirect.com/mmh/lis_pdf/OWNM/L0712266.pdf .

I hope this helps.

Cindy Wells

Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Aug 15, 2020 | 28 views


You did not post the model number but it is most likely the heating element that has failed if this is an electric unit.

Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Jul 25, 2020 | 67 views


When your dryer stopped spinning it is most likely caused by a broken belt, you can reach to the drum and try turning it by hand and if it spins easily, the belt is probably broken or slipped off. A not spinning dryer can be also due to a faulty drum roller. In rare cases the motor is faulty and the dryer won't spin.

I got this from https://www.electrafixbc.ca/appliances/dryer.html
Check it out for more info on your dryer drum issue. Good luck!

Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Jun 20, 2020 | 59 views


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ll0wbqj5gNo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSkReqML_IM

The "thermal limiter" for the dryer is located on the inside wall of the rear panel of the dryer. You will need to remove the top of the dryer to access the "thermal limiter".
https://www.shopyourway.com/questions/1181795


Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Apr 19, 2020 | 66 views


Yes of course. Just click the link below


https://www.repairclinic.com/ProductDetail/188688

Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Apr 13, 2020 | 65 views


The Kenmore 417.81102003 was built by Frigidaire. The E61 error usually means a problem with the heater relay or the wiring. The E64 error indicates the problem may be the heating element or the wiring. To further diagnose the problem, you need to unplug the dryer and disconnect the exhaust hose. Then use the trouble-shooting sheet and wiring diagram that is usually inside the machine. (Often the sheet is inside the unit behind the control panel and accessed after removing part of the back). You will need a multi-meter to check for resistance and continuity across the relay, element and wiring.

The parts list and a copy of the wiring diagram is available here: https://www.searspartsdirect.com/model/4yud5cg7hp-000583/kenmore-elite-41781102000-dryer-parts .

I hope this helps.

Cindy Wells

Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Mar 31, 2020 | 103 views


YOU MAY WANT TO TEST YOUR DOOR SWITCH WITH AMULTI METER


ELECTRIC Dryer no heat or little heat, or shuts down to fast:
Check your venting and lint basket.Check blower for lint build up and blower wheel obstruction., test by trying to turn the wheel manually by hand (should be easy) May have to remove cabinet or front/back plate to get to it)

Next check the heating element itself with a meter for continuity it should show OHMS CLOSED CIRCUIT. If not its defective or has a short if its grounding out? Which in turns causes blown fuses or thermostats or
overheating.

The heating elements are located inside the heater ducts. If you think a heating element is faulty, test it with avolt-ohm-multimeter (VOM)set to the RX1 scale at 20K ohms. Disconnect the leads from the power terminals and clip one probe of the VOM to each terminal. The meter should read about 12. (1200) ohms. If the reading is higher ohms, the heater is faulty and should be replaced. Replace a faulty heater with a new one of the same type and electrical rating. A heater connected to a 115-volt line usually has an 8.4-ohm resistance; a heater connected to a 220-volt line usually has 11 ohms resistance.


Check dryer Terminal block prongs both outside prongs should give combined 220, and 110 each if u check 1 outside & 1 center (ground) prong. Also check house electrical outlet for full voltage. 220 because if u only get half or 110 volts you will be able to run the machine which uses only 110 to run motor but not the heater which uses a full 220,

OR you may have a broken centrifugal switch in the motor because this switch activates the motor and the heater as well. supposed to be if the motor does not run, the heater should not heat in order not to create a fire but if the motor is not running, and the heater is still heating, then there could be a problem with the motor centrifugal switch that is connected to this interlock switch that should trigger the heater.

Check the thermal cut off, the cycling and the hi limit thermostats.
For continuity or OHMS. If no ohms or resistance they need replacement.

In some dryer's the control panel relies on a thermistor rather than a CYCLING thermostat to regulate the drum's air temperature by monitoring the component's resistance changes; resistance goes down as temperature increases and up when temperature decreases. Once the drum's air temperature reaches a certain level required to dry clothes, the control panel shuts off the heater. The panel will turn the heater on again and begin another heating cycle when the thermistor indicates that more heat is needed to keep the air temperature constant inside the drum this is why in some cases the dryer will operate at lower cycles like gentle or low heat but not at higher settings?)

Lastly check your moister sensor. ( located inside the dryer door usually)Especially if machine seems to shut down early and clothes are still wet.
Test with a meter at room temperature and it should show continuity.
A failed moisture sensor will affect the dryer run time in the automatic moisture sensing cycle but it will not affect the heating of the dryer or the timed cycle. Which are reflected by the thermostats.
Read more :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVTBrGMql7g
http://www.ehow.com/info_12203962_check-dryer-thermistor.
GOD IS So GOOD !!!! AND THAT'S WHY MY ADVICE IS FREE

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Kenmore HE5... | Answered on Mar 20, 2020 | 733 views


ELECTRIC Dryer no heat or little heat, or shuts down to fast:
Check your venting and lint basket.Check blower for lint build up and blower wheel obstruction., test by trying to turn the wheel manually by hand (should be easy) May have to remove cabinet or front/back plate to get to it)

Next check the heating element itself with a meter for continuity it should show OHMS CLOSED CIRCUIT. If not its defective or has a short if its grounding out? Which in turns causes blown fuses or thermostats or
overheating.

The heating elements are located inside the heater ducts. If you think a heating element is faulty, test it with avolt-ohm-multimeter (VOM)set to the RX1 scale at 20K ohms. Disconnect the leads from the power terminals and clip one probe of the VOM to each terminal. The meter should read about 12. (1200) ohms. If the reading is higher ohms, the heater is faulty and should be replaced. Replace a faulty heater with a new one of the same type and electrical rating. A heater connected to a 115-volt line usually has an 8.4-ohm resistance; a heater connected to a 220-volt line usually has 11 ohms resistance.


Check dryer Terminal block prongs both outside prongs should give combined 220, and 110 each if u check 1 outside & 1 center (ground) prong. Also check house electrical outlet for full voltage. 220 because if u only get half or 110 volts you will be able to run the machine which uses only 110 to run motor but not the heater which uses a full 220,

OR you may have a broken centrifugal switch in the motor because this switch activates the motor and the heater as well. supposed to be if the motor does not run, the heater should not heat in order not to create a fire but if the motor is not running, and the heater is still heating, then there could be a problem with the motor centrifugal switch that is connected to this interlock switch that should trigger the heater.

Check the thermal cut off, the cycling and the hi limit thermostats.
For continuity or OHMS. If no ohms or resistance they need replacement.

In some dryer's the control panel relies on a thermistor rather than a CYCLING thermostat to regulate the drum's air temperature by monitoring the component's resistance changes; resistance goes down as temperature increases and up when temperature decreases. Once the drum's air temperature reaches a certain level required to dry clothes, the control panel shuts off the heater. The panel will turn the heater on again and begin another heating cycle when the thermistor indicates that more heat is needed to keep the air temperature constant inside the drum this is why in some cases the dryer will operate at lower cycles like gentle or low heat but not at higher settings?)

Lastly check your moister sensor. ( located inside the dryer door usually)Especially if machine seems to shut down early and clothes are still wet.
Test with a meter at room temperature and it should show continuity.
A failed moisture sensor will affect the dryer run time in the automatic moisture sensing cycle but it will not affect the heating of the dryer or the timed cycle. Which are reflected by the thermostats.
Read more :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVTBrGMql7g
http://www.ehow.com/info_12203962_check-dryer-thermistor.
GOD IS So GOOD !!!! AND THAT'S WHY MY ADVICE IS FREE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMP7BW1lLs4
Dryer venting issues slow drying, fire flare ups, to hot, noise and clothes ripping etc
A lint filter that is full of lint will restrict airflow and lengthen dry times.
A blower wheel that is not firmly attached to the drive motor can slip and therefore not move air fast enough to properly dry clothes or even reduce airflow to the point where the high limit thermostat may trip and turn off the heat circuit.
In gas dryers, defective gas valve coils can create a symptom of taking too long to dry if they are intermittent. Check for proper flame ignition for the complete dry cycle to determine if this may be the cause.

The drum seals are used to prevent excess air from entering the dryer drum and act as a cushion between the drum and the front and rear bulkheads. The drum seals are made up of a felt like material. If the seal is torn or is worn then clothing can become stuck in the gap when the drum is turning. This can produce a scraping or thumping noise and the clothes can also be ripped and/or have black marks on them.
DOOR SEAL When the door is closed in gas and electric dryers the door seal helps to keep cooler air from entering the drum.

The vent tube or line itself. If it is kinked, smashed, to long, or filled, clogged with lint build up it can not only cause slow dry times but create a fire safety hazard. Try to stay away from using plastic or flimsy cellophane venting, aluminum is best!

To provide better air flow and heat dissipation try the following
Note the length of your dryer vent is a determining factor in how efficient your dryer will perform. If the total length of your pipe exceeds 25 feet then your dryer simply won't be able to perform as should, especially if your pipe runs vertically and through the roof. This is where a booster fan is sometimes needed. Booster Fans provide the extra push of air to exhaust the moisture and lint to the outside. These fans operate only when the dryer is activated, this is done by sensing the air flow through the pipe by a pressure switch mechanism or an electrical sensing relay which in turn activates the booster fan blower. I personally try to avoid adding booster fans simply because they are usually placed in a crawl space or attic and are therefore "Out of sight and out of mind." What I mean is... the unit could malfunction and you would never be aware of it. The result would be a restriction in the pipe which would cause a build up of lint at the fan. In addition, it's recommended that lint traps be placed before the fan itself which has to be cleaned out frequently. These can also easily be overlooked.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMP7BW1lLs4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LgXzYO_bGWU

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Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Mar 20, 2020 | 108 views


make sure it is not set on air only,just went to a job and that's what it was lol.unplug dryer,take off bottom panel,on right side you'll see the heating element,pull off one of the wires and read out heater with a meter,if it's bad you'll need part number 3387747

Kenmore Elite... | Answered on Mar 09, 2020 | 10,467 views


Make sure lint trap is clean and air vent line is clean if they are it might be a sensor but you don't want a fire good luck

Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Jan 19, 2020 | 111 views


What about it?

Kenmore Dryers | Answered on Jan 13, 2020 | 102 views

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