Electrical Supplies - Page 4 - Recent Questions, Troubleshooting & Support


90 amps at 220 volts 166 amps at 120 vots

Electric Circuit... | Answered on Oct 14, 2014


Pretty easy if you can get the wires from the existing wall outlet. Just run a wire from existing outlet to the where you want the new light. Install inside an approved ceiling electrical outlet box and then run another wire to where you want the switch or switches. If you go to home depot or the library you can look at the books with diagrams on how to wire it. You can skip the wall switch if you use a light with a pull chain.

Electric... | Answered on Sep 20, 2014


integrated service design
inspectional services department
is for the utilities department.

Electric... | Answered on Feb 24, 2014


you said it yourself. when an electrical device is running it produces amps, with every amp is a unit of heat. breakers are heat sensitive as well. so you might want to consider a new breaker. newer breakers are made out of better materials that are able to displace heat more efficiently. or check to make sure the screws on the terminals where the wires go in are tight. if there is a loose connection that will increase the units of heat traveling through the termination. or, worse case scenario, like when all hope is lost. splice in some more wire, correctly, emphasis on correctly, and relocate the breaker. perhaps use insulation around the breaker, non flammable of course.

Electric... | Answered on Feb 24, 2014


lament term is relay bounce. that's one. another could be that the line side of the contact is fed by parallel lines causing something called eddie current causing an unbalanced load. you may not have all of the terminals where the wires terminate tight, that will cause heat to build up at the contact. you could be using the wrong contactor for that particular application. check the life cycles, not the amperage rating. then again, check the amperage rating for contactor, then look at the device and what are the specs for that. if it runs at a higher ampacity than the contactor will burn up every time. are there thermal overloads on the contactor. if so, what are their rating........ these in fact are all valid questions I just asked you, and I can keep going, for days. you have to give more specifics than that, otherwise anyone who knows electricity will never be able to give you an accurate diagnoses. I'm more than willing to help though. it even comes down to the manufacture who makes the contact. sometimes you want a certain name brand for a certain application.

Electric Circuit... | Answered on Feb 24, 2014


Here is a sample of how to wire a winch. I have built my own box with relays to swap the power for reverse etc I'm not sure if you have to buy an extra kit where someone has done the work for you or not. It looks neater when purchased. Click here

Electric... | Answered on Nov 26, 2013


On newer furnaces the fan starts in a period of time factory set and is initiated by the control board. The air conditioning fan is started by the thermostat and starts right away when the stat calls for cooling. You will need a tech. familiar with this model and carrying the right parts to look it over. Does the furnace fire and then shut off in a few minutes? If so, it is most likely to be the board. Sorry. It may be pricy.

Electric Circuit... | Answered on Nov 22, 2013


Copy following link:
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-replace-circuit-breaker.html

Gene

If you need further help, I’m available over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gene_9f0ef4df2f9897e7

Electric... | Answered on Oct 10, 2013


Hi - I'm an electrican and would like to help.

If the wire you're trying to install on a circuit breaker doesn't fit - then something is wrong. Typically, circuits are designed around the amount of voltage and current a product requires. The voltage determines the combination of material & thickness of the insulation on the wire and the the amount of current (in amps) determines the size of the conductor or wire. The appropriate circuit protection (fuse or circuit breaker) is selected to protect the circuit from trying to deliver more current than the product requires (in the case of a fault, etc.) which would cause the wire to over heat and potentially cause a fire. So, if the product requires (for simplicity) 120 volts and 20 amps, a wire is selected with the proper insulation for 120 volts or more and conductor sized to carry no less than 20 amps. Aluminum and copper is expensive, so providing larger sizes than needed is a waste of resources and money. A #12 copper wire is suitable for this amount of amps. A circuit breaker rated for 20 amps is chosen. A 20 amp circuit breaker must be able to accept a wire capable of 20 amps - other wise it's not really a 20 amp circuit breaker. Most circuit breakers are designed to accept LARGER wires than needed - because often times circuits will need a wire that is one or two sizes larger due to the length of the circuit (how far the product is from the electrical panel).

If you're seeing a circuit breaker that will not accept the wire, the circuit breaker is probably the wrong size (and if you could force the wire in it - it would probably trip instantly when turned on) or someone has made a very expensive blunder when chosing the wire type and size for the circuit.

If the the latter is the case, simply connect a short length of the correct size wire to the oversized wire in an appropriate connector and secure to the circuit breaker terminal screw. otherwise, have a qualified person evaluate the situation. Be smart. Be safe.

Electric Circuit... | Answered on Mar 02, 2013


Hi Gladys,

I'm an electrician and would like to help you out. You should contact your friends and nieghbors to learn of the experiences they have had - both good and bad - with electricians.

Ideally, the work they had done was similir to the work you need to have done for a good "apples to apples - oranges to oranges" comparison. Next, you can contact your community's Better Business Bureau. Their recommendation is only for companies that have PAID them to be listed - however - they will tell you how many complaints, etc. they have had with the ones you ask about - so a "recommendation" from them really has little to do with the quality of the work the company performs.

Angie's List is an online data base of all kinds of service providers that many people swear by. It does cost to join however, so if your project is only a repair or small job, it may not be the best way to go.

Yelp is a free version of Angie's List (but it is NOT affiliated with Angie's List - just to be clear). Here, you'll find ratings from antone that cares to write a review on a business - from Pizza Joints to Dentists.

With these sources, you should be able to get a fairly good idea of the reputation of the electricans in your area. I hope this helps & good luck!

Electric... | Answered on Mar 02, 2013


1) Copy following links:
http://waterheatertimer.org/H230A.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/T80-timer-wiring-700.jpg
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-install-3-phase-timer.html

2) Add comment and say what device you are wiring, and voltage being used.

If you need further help, I’m available over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gene_9f0ef4df2f9897e7

Electric... | Answered on Jan 31, 2013


you will need a 10 -3 wire hook up the red and black to fuse netral and ground to the ground should work

Electric 30 Amp... | Answered on Aug 03, 2012


Open following link for single-pole and 3-way installations:
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-wire-GE-15312-timer.html

If you have two hot wires inside the same box, that is unusual unless the power source is 240volt.
However it is possible that box has two hot wires and each controls a different light.

If you need further help, I’m available over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gene_9f0ef4df2f9897e7

Electric... | Answered on Jun 26, 2012


There are several R series switches:
http://www.canal.com.tw/images/products/r.htm
Each appears to have terminal, or solder connections.
Electrician uses multimeter set to read ohms to check continuity of unknown switch.
Set to read ohms, and then test each terminal with other terminals, then flip the switch and repeat same test.
Then connect Hot wire to one terminal on the switch.
For example if there are two wires going to a 120Volt light bulb ... then one wire is Hot and the other Neutral. Cut the Hot wire and then connect the two cut ends to switch terminals. So the switch will turn the Hot wire on-and-off.
The neutral wire is not connected to the switch.

If you need further help, I’m available over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gene_9f0ef4df2f9897e7

Electric... | Answered on Jun 26, 2012


There are several R series switches:
http://www.canal.com.tw/images/products/r.htm
Each appears to have terminal, or solder connections.
Electrician uses multimeter set to read ohms to check continuity of unknown switch.
Set to read ohms, and then test each terminal with other terminals, then flip the switch and repeat same test.
Then connect Hot wire to one terminal on the switch.
For example if there are two wires going to a 120Volt light bulb ... then one wire is Hot and the other Neutral. Cut the Hot wire and then connect the two cut ends to switch terminals. So the switch will turn the Hot wire on-and-off.
The neutral wire is not connected to the switch.

If you need further help, I’m available over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gene_9f0ef4df2f9897e7

Electric... | Answered on Jun 26, 2012


This may help (or maybe not):
The Black wire is the ground wire, and the other two are considered Hot wires, and their
order does not matter - they carry 240 Volts AC.
So, once you identify which terminal on the solenoid is ground, connect Black to it, then just hook up the remaining two Hot wires in any order.

Electric... | Answered on Jul 04, 2011


Not only do you need a 12 volt supply (13.8V) to operate this winch, but you also need a.) wire large enough to carry the electrical load, and b.) a power source that has the necessary current (amps) to turn the motor.

If you have wires that are too small, they will heat up and not be able to deliver the current (amps) required by the motor. If your power source is to small - it can not supply the current required. The result of either conditions is "voltage drop". This can be explained the same way your car needs a 12 volt car battery to start. If that car battery was dead, you couldn't connect eight "D" cell batteries (8 x 1.5volts = 12 volts) together and attach to the car's battery cables and expect it to start. This is because the amount of current available in the car battery is hundreds of time greater than eight "D" cell batteries - even though when the D cells are connected in series - both systems deliver 12 volts.

If neither of the above conditions is present, then there could be an electrical problem with the drive motor itself. This could be a shorted / melted winding or other electrical connection that is not right, even if the drum spins freely.

Electric... | Answered on Apr 04, 2011


If the relays constantly click, your motor is shorted out and bad causing your thermal breaker to trip and open the relays. You will have to replace the motor.

Electric... | Answered on Mar 14, 2011

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