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Anonymous Posted on Sep 13, 2005

Deapth Of Field

Is there any way to adjust the depth of field when using the macro setting on my Sony 717?

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  • Posted on Sep 13, 2005
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Joined: Aug 25, 2005
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Yes, use manual setting and stop down your aperture setting. This was probably f/2,8 or even 2,0. You'll need more light though or other wise a slower shutter speed to compensate for the more closed down aperture. This is a standard issue with macro and worse off with digital due to the inherent relatively narrower DOF that comes with a small image sensor.

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1answer

D80 - Changing Aperture priority setting doesn't change depth of field

It is possible that there are other factors affecting the depth of field in your photos, even when changing the aperture priority setting. The aperture value determines the size of the opening in the lens through which light enters the camera body and onto the camera sensor. A larger aperture (smaller f-number) results in a shallower depth of field, while a smaller aperture (larger f-number) results in a deeper depth of field. However, other factors such as the focal length of the lens, the distance between the camera and the subject, and the size of the camera sensor also play a role in determining the depth of field.
It is important to understand that aperture priority mode does not guarantee a specific depth of field, as the camera will still automatically adjust other settings such as shutter speed to achieve a balanced exposure. If you want to control the depth of field more precisely, you can switch to manual mode and adjust both the aperture and shutter speed until you achieve the desired effect.
In conclusion, if you're not getting the desired depth of field despite changing the aperture priority setting, it's best to examine other factors that could be affecting your photos and adjust accordingly.
Feb 12, 2023 • Cameras
tip

Controlling Depth of Field

A photographed object will only appear sharp in an area a specific distance from the camera. The human eye and brain still accept some areas of the image as acceptably sharp if they lie near the plane of focus and already show a small degree of blur. This zone, which is still in acceptably sharp focus, is called depth of field.

You'd typically want a wide depth of field when shooting landscapes, so as to have everything from the flower in the foreground to the mountains on the horizon in focus. You'd typically want a narrow depth of field for such subjects as portraits and flowers, blurring the background to avoid distractions.

How large this depth of field is depends on the distance to the subject, the aperture, and the focal length of the lens. Whether you're shooting film or digital makes no difference.

If the plane of focus lies further away from the camera, the depth of field is wider than if the camera focuses on an object close by.

Small apertures (large f/numbers) result in a wider depth of field.

Short focal length lenses (wide angle) have a wider depth of field than long focal length lenses (telephoto).

The depth of field is determined by the actual focal length of the lens, not the "35-mm equivalent" often used in the camera specifications. Because most compact cameras have sensors much smaller than SLRs, they have much shorter lenses, giving wider depth of field. This is great for landscapes, not so great for portraits.

To get a narrow depth of field, set the aperture as large as you can (smaller f/numbers), move in close to the subject, and zoom in. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Portrait mode. And yes, the last two items above, moving in close and zooming in, are in opposition, You'll have to decide on the best balance for your picture.

To get a wide depth of field, set the aperture as small as you can (larger f/numbers), move away from the subject, and zoom out. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Landscape mode.

Before going on vacation or shooting your child's wedding, experiment with these factors. Shoot things in your backyard or at a park, trying for both narrow and deep depth of field, then look at the pictures on your computer.
on Jun 23, 2011 • Cameras
tip

Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the...

Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the photograph is in focus. If the main subject is in focus but the foreground and background are blurred, the photo is said to have a shallow depth of field. if most of the photo is in focus, including the foreground and background, the photo is said to have a wide depth of field.

Depth of field is controlled by the aperture setting:

- A wide aperture setting (indicated by a low f-stop number) will provide shallow depth of field, resulting in the main subject being in focus and the foreground and background being blurry. This setting is particularly useful when taking portraits or when using a macro lens.

- A narrow aperture setting (indicated by a higher f-stop number) will provide wider depth of field, resulting in the entire photo being in focus. This setting is particularly useful when taking landscape or wide-angle photographs.

The photographs below are examples of how the same subject will photograph using different aperture settings. Note that as the aperture closes, which will allow less light to reach the image sensor, the shutter speed gets faster to produce the appropriate exposure.



shajanrs.jpg

shajanrs_0.jpg

shajanrs_1.jpg

shajanrs_2.jpg

I think you have got a general idea about depth filed. If you have further questions, you can ask me directly. http://www.fixya.com/users/shajanrs






depth of field - what is depth field - how depth field affects picture - how to adjust depth field - DEPTH FIELD - depthfield - DEPTHFIELD
0helpful
1answer

Close-ups of jewellery

Are you handholding the camera? For macro photography you almost have to have the camera on a tripod or other stable support.

Is everything blurry? That probably indicates camera motion since I assume the jewelry isn't moving. If part of the picture is sharp, probably in the center, then it's a depth of field issue. The camera focuses a certain distance away, and anything not at that distance (closer or farther away) tends to blur. Unfortunately there's not much you can do to control depth of field with a point&shoot camera. See http://www.fixya.com/support/r9564373-controlling_depth_field.
2helpful
1answer

I hae a Canon AE-1. Holding the camera so that one if facing the lens: at the bottom right, at the 5:00 position, up against the lens assembly, is a black switch or button or whatever you want to call...

It's normally referred to as a depth of field preview. It's used to stop down the lens to whatever aperture you've set it to, so you can preview the depth of field to see how much of your scene will be in focus at any given aperture. It's not often used, but can be important in macro and portrait photography when a shallow depth of field and critical point of focus are both necessary.
0helpful
1answer

What f should i set my camera to and shutter speed to get the best pics at full 300 mm pics

That depends on what you want the picture to say to the viewer. If you want a deep depth of field, set a small aperture (large f/number). If you want a narrow depth of field, set a large aperture (small f/number). If you want to freeze motion, use a fast shutter speed. If you want to blur motion, use a slow shutter speed. There's no such thing as a best setting for all pictures, or there would be no need for the other settings.
1helpful
2answers

Hello! I have a Nikon coolpix p1 and i use it to macro shots of teeth( I am dental master degree student) it is very esential for my work. However almost all my photos come out either blurry or out of...

Okay, if you're getting sharper pictures with a stable camera, that indicates that the shutter speed is too slow. You can get a faster shutter speed by using a higher ISO. You'll get noisier pictures, though.

Up close, you're not going to get much depth-of-field, so you can also try opening up the aperture (small F/numbers). You can also try to get more light onto the teeth.
2helpful
1answer

Blurres LCD image and blurred photos

1 suspect dirt on the lens ensue the lens is cleaned with proper cloth and fluid.
2 suspect auto focus sensor is defective or blocked ensure the little windows on the front are clear and fingers do not cover them while taking pictures.

3 suspect camera is set in macro setting, Macro only has a depth of field of a few centimeters any subject outside this field will be out of focus but his may not be visible on the small viewing screen on the camera but becomes apparent when images are viewed at larger sizes.
change camera setting to landscape or portrait setting.
0helpful
1answer

Blurred picture with nikon coolpix 995 macro mode

When shooting in macro to get good depth of field you often have to shoot f/22. This does not let much light in. You have to hold the camera and subject tight. Meaning the use of a firm tripod is not optional. In most cases you need a longer exposure so wiggle is very important.
0helpful
2answers

Sony DSC-P72 close up photos

A common problem is that you have some 3.2 Megapixel (MP) and that image is all of 640x480 or 0.3072 M. That means you could move back from the camera, shoot at 3.2 MP then crop out a 640x480 image that may be in focus.
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