Question about Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-F828 Digital Camera

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F828 and ISO question

If set the aperture on my F828 to F2.2 and raise the ISO setting from 64 to 400, will the shutter speed increase or decrease when shooting on a sunny day? Thanks Richard Cooper

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If you're in shutter-priority mode, yes, the shutter speed will increase. If you're in manual mode, it won't do anything until you set it manually. Just remember that, for any given exposure, shutter speed and f-stop are inversely proportional. Higher fStop, lower shutter speed. Lower f-Stop, higher shutter speed. And that the higher the f-stop, the smaller the aperture. On the F828, f2.0 is largest aperture (most light), f8 is smallest aperture (least light). ISO, on the other hand, is an approximation of film speed. In reality, however, raising the ISO just amplifies the signal downstream from the sensor - but the net effect is the same as lowering the f-stop (bigger aperture), which allows you to have a faster shutter speed for the same exposure. Hope this helps...

Posted on Sep 12, 2005

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Because you are (a) opening the lens aperture to let in the maximum light and (b) making the sensor more sensitive so that it requires less light, so the camera must do what it can to counter your settings - to reduce the light by minimizing the time of the exposure. I presume this is a hypothetical question, as you don't normally want to use ISO this high with the F828 if it can be avoided.

Posted on Sep 12, 2005

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How does aperture setting affect a photograph?


The aperture is the opening in the lens through which light passes to the image sensor. Changing the aperture setting allows you to control the depth of field of a photograph. When the aperture is opened to a widersetting, (indicated by a lower f-stop number) more light is passed to the imagesensor, creating more shallow depth of field. Closing the aperture (indicatedby a higher f-stop number) allows less light to pass to the image sensor,creating wider depth of field.

NOTE: The aperture setting is one of three primary settings usedto control the overall exposure of a photograph. The other two primary settingsare ISO and shutter speed. Because the three settings work together to produce the overall exposure for a photograph, changingthe aperture setting will require complimentary changes to either the ISO or shutter speed to produce a properly exposed photograph. These changes will bemade automatically by the camera in the Auto, Program, Aperture-priority andShutter-priority modes.

There are two ways tocontrol the aperture setting on the camera:
  • Aperture-priority mode (A) - When shooting in Aperture priority mode (A), you set the aperture value and the camera automatically sets the optimum shutter speed for you.
  • Manual mode (M) - When shooting in Manual mode (M), you control both aperture and shutter speed, which gives you maximum creative control to achieve the exact results you want.

on Jan 08, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

I cannot take photos when i shot with manual mode.The shutter clicks but no picture is actually taken.Darkness.The auto mode works fine.Lens Nikkor Micro AF-S 105mm.Drives me crazy


When you shoot in manual mode, make sure your camera sensor gets enough light. When you shoot inside with dimm light at 1/1000 of a second or faster and a aperture of 8. all pictures will be black.
The best way to learn shooting in manual, is to shoot a picture in the P mode and put the picture on the screen (>) button. then select the info, where you see time, aperture iso and so on. and even better select the histogram. Note the figures in your head (or on paper) and then goto manual and make sure you have almost the same settings. Then shoot en look what the histogram shows. No histogram on the right, means to little light, so lower the shutter speed, open the diaphragm or increase the ISO. No histogram on the left, means to much light, so higher shutter speed, lower ISO or smaler diaphragm (the aperture number must be up. 3,6 is wide open 16 is almost closed.

Mar 14, 2015 | Nikon D7000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pics too dark


decrease shutter speed, increase aperture size (lower F-stop), and/or increase ISO.

Mar 28, 2014 | Canon EOS Rebel XSi Digital Camera

1 Answer

Where is apulture,iso,shutter speed options present in camera


This is one of the biggest drawbacks of a point&shoot camera. You're expected to point the camera and shoot the picture without worrying about minor details like aperture and shutter speed.
You can select the ISO by pressing the FUNC/SET button in the shooting mode and then selecting ISO (third item from the top along the left edge of the screen).
You can control the aperture and shutter speed somewhat by changing the scene mode. For example, the portrait mode will try to give you a wide aperture, the landscape mode will try to give you a small aperture, and the sports mode will try to give you a fast shutter speed.
If you want to take your photography above and beyond the point&shoot level then you need a more capable camera.

May 10, 2012 | Canon PowerShot A420 Digital Camera

2 Answers

I bought this lense and need instant help. I am shooting pics at a high school football game and it gets dark early. What settings do I switch my camera to in order to get sufficient light and capture all...


Shooting sports and the evening can be a compromise between needed s fast shutter to stop action or a longer shutter to allow enough light for a good exposure. Fortunately, you've got a "fast" lens. My suggestions are:

Shoot in "A" mode (aperture priority) and change the aperture of the lens to the lowest number available to make the aperture open to maximum, and increase the ISO to 400 or 800. You may even get satisfactory results at ISO1600, but you should check the results on a computer screen before blindly going out shooting at the level.

By increasing the aperture, two things happen; exposure times are reduced to minimum so that motion is stopped (or blur minimized) and the the depth of field becomes very narrow or "shallow". Depth of field or "DOF" describes the distance in front and beyond the point of focus that will also be in focus. Large apertures (low "f" number s like 1.4 to 2.8 ) = narrow DOF and small apertures (high "f" numbers like 16 to 22 and beyond) = wide DOF. An example would be if you took a picture of someone's face from a2 feet away at f 1.4 and focused on the tip of the nose - the eyes would begin to get soft or out of focus - the ears would be even more noticeable - and that background would very blurred. The same picture at f 22 nearly everything would be in focus - except for maybe the background - depending how far behind it is from the subject's head. Check the example below:

steve_con_4.jpeg
Look at the backgrounds of the pictures above. The left is largely in focus at f 8 while the right is blurry at f 2.5. Had left been shot at f 22 or more, more of the background would be in focus.


Increasing the ISO to 400 or 800 increases the camera's sensitivity to light like film. The higher the ISO, the less time it takes to get a properly exposed picture. High ISO are helpful in low light situations or other times you need to have a faster shutter speed (for sports or don't have a tripod for pictures that need long exposures). Assume you want to take a picture of something that the camera tells you won't be exposed correctly unless you shoot at say for example f 2.8 and shutter is 1/30 second. If the camera ISO was set to 100, you could change it to 200. This doubles the sensitivity to light - meaning you need 1/2 the light; you can change the f number from f 2.8 to f 4, OR, leave it at 2.8 and increase the shutter speed to the next faster value 1/60 sec. If you change the ISO to 400, it is now 4x's sensitive than 100 (or 2x's than 200). At ISO 400, you could go two f stops smaller to f 5.6 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/125. For ISO 800, you could go three f stops smaller to f 8 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/250. You can mix and match, too. Go one up on the speed and two smaller on the aperture. The drawback to higher ISOs is that the pictures become grainier with each increase. Eventually, the pictures don't look good when you get into ISO numbers above 800 (or less on some DSLR cameras - and even less on point and shoot types). You have to experiment to find where your preferences are. See below for Low and High ISO comparison shots:

steve_con_86.jpg
The left picture above has nice, smooth transitions between shades of colors - the right picture has a grainy appearance called "noise". Some is acceptable but others are not - it depends what YOU can live with. Sometimes it's better to have a grainy shot than nothing at all.

Lastly, you can shoot "S" for shutter mode, to control motion instead of "A" which controls volume of light instead. The same principles apply.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Sep 08, 2011 | Tamron SP AF 70200mm f28 Di LD IF Makro...

1 Answer

How do I set the Iso and flash


ISO is the sensitivity to light. The lower numbers 80, 100, 200 are the LEAST sensitive (but provide the best looking pictures). Sensitivity has to do with the amount of light needed to properly expose an image. ISO is a part of exposure that works with Aperture (f stop) and shutter speed (in seconds - or fractional seconds). Here's how it looks:

steve_con_63.jpg

The graphic above shows that varying either of these three values changes the exposure. If you change one by one step, you have to change one of the others by one step to get about the same exposure result. Each of the step values on your camera for the shutter, aperture and ISO is twice as much as the previous value. ISO 1600 is 2x ISO 800, which is 2x ISO 400, and 2x ISO 200 and finally, 2x ISO 100 (some cameras go to ISO 50 or less!).

The shutter works the same way: 1/1000 is 2x faster than 1/500, and 2x 1/125, and 2x 1/60, and 2 x 1/30, etc. These are easy to see the how each is twice as much as the other.

Finally, the aperture. Each "f stop" allows 2x as much light as the previous value. f2 lets 2x as much light as f2.8, which lets in 2x as much as f4, etc. I know the number don't double like you would expect, and the smaller numbers allow more light (you'd think it was the other way around) - but it's because we're talking about a circular lenses and it has to do with how we calculate area of a circle (3.14 x R squared). It may be easier to recall small numbers = equal large openings by thinking of f numbers with a "1/" over them - like this: 1/f1.4, or 1/f2, 1/f2.8, etc. Here's a chart that shows how aperture and shutter speed work together at one ISO setting.

steve_con_64.jpg

Read them across, the top line shows that 1/250 @ f1.4 is the SAME as 1/125 @ f2.0, which is also the SAME as shooting 1/60 @ 2.8, etc. If you were to increase the by one step, the shutter speeds would increase by a factor of two. Twice as much light by opening the aperture by a single stop means you must halve the exposure time or halve the ISO value. Likewise, if it's too dark to get a decent picture; increase exposure time or ISO value to capture enough light.

Assume a properly exposed picture requires 1/30 of a second at f5.6 with ISO 200. If the camera was increased by one step to ISO 400, you can take the picture a f5.6 still but in 1/60 sec - greatly reducing the chance of blur from holding the camera in you hand. You could even go up one more step to ISO 400 and shoot in 1/125 sec, which would reduce the blur even more. Fast shutter speeds reduce the "camera shake" and stop motion in sports photography - or other moving objects. If you had the camera set up on a tripod, you could dial the ISO down to ISO 100 and shoot at 1/30 of a sec at f5.6. If your lens can open up to f4, you can shoot in half the time because the lens is letting in twice the light. Some point and shoot cameras don't allow changing f stops or even shutter speeds - so all you can do it raise and lower ISO.

Which camera and flash do you have?

May 23, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

X-370S 35mm SLR Camera: what is the best aperture, shutter speed and iso f...


Your camera light meter should tell you, but in case it doesn't work then all you need to remember is the "Sunny 16 Rule". Basically, on a bright day and with the lens aperture set to f16 you set the reciprocal of the film speed.

So with ISO 100 film the reciprocal is 1/100, or 1/100th of a second. Your camera shutter speed dial doesn't have that, but it does have 1/125th which is close enough.

Once you have the exposure set for f16 then if you adjust the aperture you simply adjust the shutter speed to match. So if you decide to set f11 that allows twice as much light onto the film so to compensate you reset the shutter speed to 1/250th of a second to halve the light coming in. As twice the light coming in through the aperture is compensated for by halving the light coming in via the shutter, the exposure remains the same.

Although this works for a sunny day, you just guess based on experience other lighting conditions. So if it's bright but overcast then you can leave things as they are, but if it's dull and overcast allow one extra stop of exposure by opening the aperture by one setting or by doubling the time that the shutter remains open. So from the starting point of f16 at 1/125 (as above), on a dull cloudy day you'd either set f11 OR 1/60. If you set f11 AND 1/60 then you'll be allowing not just twice as much light in but three times as much.

Hope this helps, if so please take a moment to rate my answer. If it's too complicated then please add a comment and I'll re-explain in even simpler terms.

May 18, 2010 | Minolta X-370S 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

My eos40d on sports mode is not shooting at its proper speed at 6.5 frames per second. it shoots 2 frames per second and the piture cones out orange and not focus I only have this camera four weeks any...


6.5fps is only the manufacturer's indicative maximum. The camera will not always perform at this speed when conditions aren't suitable (too dark, for example). In Sports Mode, the camera decides the correct shutter speed for that scene. If it's not a very bright day, shutter speed has to be lowered (slow) to compensate for the lack of light. This results in a lower frame per second.

If you want to test the max fps, set your camera on Tv, and set the speed to 1/1000+ on a bright sunny day. Set the Drive Mode to AI Focus or AI Servo. If at 1/1000th of a sec, the Aperture value blinks in the viewfinder, you don't have enough light. Increase the ISO. You should be able to achieve 6.5fps. That's my experience anyway. Good luck.

Sep 18, 2009 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

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