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Question about Sony Mavica MVC-FD88 Digital Camera

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Low Lite LCD Use

How do you see anything through the LCD under low light conditions, such as a party with dim lighting, in order to take a picture and have any clue as to what is going on in front of the lens? Everybody is commenting on the low light performance or the LCD performance in bright light. What about low light and the LCD? This seems to be a real limitation, but if anybody has suggestions, I would like to know how I might cope with this issue.

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Anonymous

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I disagree. It may be WYSIWYG but given the variety of lighting conditions, while the LCD may in fact be "trying" to show me a picture, not enough light may be available from the picture takers angle to see it in the LCD. The lens gets it's light from the front, the LCD from the back. Many times, this can be two totally different lighting situations. I've taken pictures on overcast days (and I was in and out of the shadows) where the LCD was next to useless. But what I was taking a picture of was well lit. At it's best for those pictures, I could only use it for framing, but that was enough. I took the pictures and once inside I switch to playback, and find they've come out great. And an optical viewfinder would have helped. Would have saved me all the time I spend fiddling with the angle of the LCD,backlight on/off, and brightness settings. Many times people must think I'm wierd for taking pictures the way I do, having to hold the camera in wierd positions just to get the sun to hit the LCD! The worst is when the sun is directly at my back and low.

Posted on Sep 11, 2005

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The LCD is completely WYSIWYG and if you can't see anything through the LCD then the picture you take will be black too. If you are outside and open the shutter really wide you will see the LCD go white as the light overpowers the exposure. The best thing to do is to increase the ambient light in the area by turning on every light. You will still use the flash for the picture but you need to get more light on the scene to see through the LCD. For what it is worth, an optical viewfinder probably wouldn't do any better job in those situations.

Posted on Sep 11, 2005

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Anonymous

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SOURCE: it wont take a photo on regular flash

Sounds like your batteries are stuffed, or not of sufficent ma capacity, should be alkline or rechargeable of at least 2500ma

Posted on Sep 21, 2007

zohail

Shoaib Rais

  • 1223 Answers

SOURCE: Pictures are not in focus

pls update firmware from here it will auto reset ur device

http://esupport.sony.com/US/perl/swu-download.pl?template_id=1&upd_id=2137&PASSVAL2=SMB


if it doesnt correct ur problem then ur CCD might be going BAD it happens first starts with blurring and out of focus pics and low light pics , then pics turn green or pink and then completely black if firmware doesnt correct it then pls contact service centre bcoz it has the same BAD CCD batch installed in ur camera which is giving trouble to thousands of ppl world wide and companys have issued service advisories Fuji, Canon , Sony, Casio , Kodak everyone

they will cover it free of charge CCD replacement even if ur warranty is out , pls contact ur service centre and ask them abt BAD CCD and insist free of cost repairs bcoz it is manufacturing fault even if u are not in list of service advisory they will do it Pls rate me FIXYA if i helped u

see the link i am 100% sure abt it

http://www.imaging-resource.com/badccds.html

sony support link for US

http://esupport.sony.com/US/perl/model-news.pl?mdl=DSCH2&LOC=3

pls dont forget to rate me Fixya

regards

Posted on Mar 21, 2009

fotomohamed

mohamed salim shaikh

  • 321 Answers

SOURCE: takes pictures, but all over-exposed

keep iso 100 and set ur screen brightness

Posted on Jun 18, 2009

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