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Different shutter speed on top lcd & viewfinder display

What causes the shutter speed when you are taking a picture to be different on the top lcd as opposed to the shutter speed reading in the viewfinder display?

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Even moving your eye away from the viewfinder can potentially change the amount of light entering the exposure meter, so even if the camera is on a tripod, if AE lock isn't on or manual mode selected, the exposure setting may change.

Posted on Sep 08, 2005

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4helpful
2answers

How can I stop displaying the photo information on the view finder?

In the viewfinder? The viewfinder will always display things like the f/stop and the shutter speed while you're preparing to take a picture. This cannot be turned off.

If you mean on the monitor on the back when reviewing your photos, simply press up/down on the multiselector to cycle through the different views of your photos.
0helpful
1answer

Don't know what buttons on back of camera are for.

Besides the auto-flash mode, you can select fill flash, flash off, self-timer, and nighttime-view with or without flash.
Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON until the desired indicator appears on the LCD PANEL.
c3015.gif Fill flash and flash off modes remain selected after you take the picture. To cancel the selection, press the mode-selection button or close and reopen the lens cover/flash to return to the auto-flash mode.
Fill flash
c3014.gif When bright light indoors or outdoors comes from behind the subject (backlighting), dark shadows (especially on faces) may occur. Use fill flash to lighten these shadows.
  1. Open the LENS COVER/FLASH to raise the flash and to turn the camera ON.
  2. Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON repeatedly until the FILL-FLASH INDICATOR appears on the LCD PANEL.
  3. Frame your subject within the VIEWFINDER EYEPIECE.
  4. Partially depress the SHUTTER BUTTON. When the FLASH/CAMERA-READY LAMP turns off and the fill-flash indicator on the LCD panel stops blinking, fully depress the shutter button to take the picture.
Flash off
c3013.gif When you do not want to use the flash, especially indoors where flash is prohibited, such as in theaters and museums, or when you want to take twilight scenes or distant subjects that are beyond the flash range, or capture the ambiance of existing light, use the flash-off feature. Use a tripod or place the camera on another firm support, and use high-speed film because the shutter speed in these situations will most likely be slow.
  1. Open the LENS COVER/FLASH to raise the flash and to turn the camera ON.
  2. Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON repeatedly until the FLASH-OFF INDICATOR appears on the LCD PANEL.
  3. Frame your subject within the VIEWFINDER EYEPIECE.
  4. Press the SHUTTER BUTTON to take the picture.
Self-timer with auto flash
c3016.gif Use this feature to include yourself in pictures.
  1. Use the TRIPOD SOCKET to attach the camera to a tripod or place it on another firm support.
  2. Open the LENS COVER/FLASH to raise the flash and to turn the camera ON.
  3. Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON repeatedly until the SELF-TIMER INDICATOR appears on the LCD PANEL.
  4. Frame your subject within the VIEWFINDER EYEPIECE.
  5. Press the SHUTTER BUTTON. The SELF-TIMER LAMP will glow and then blink during the last three seconds of countdown.
    • To cancel the self-timer selection before the shutter releases, close the flash.
    • The self-timer automatically turns off after the shutter releases.
Night-view with flash
c3012.gif In this mode, the camera balances the flash and existing light exposure so you can take beautiful pictures of people at sunset or at night. Use a tripod or place the camera on another firm support, and use high-speed film because the shutter speed at night will most likely be slow.
  1. Open the LENS COVER/FLASH to raise the flash and to turn the camera ON.
  2. Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON repeatedly until the NIGHTTIME-VIEW INDICATOR with flash appears on the LCD PANEL.
  3. Frame your picture in the VIEWFINDER EYEPIECE.
  4. Press and hold the SHUTTER BUTTON for 12 seconds without lifting your finger. Note: If you remove your finger from the shutter button before 12 seconds, the shutter will time out immediately.
  5. After 12 seconds, release the shutter button to take the picture.
Night-view without flas
c3011.gif In this mode, you can capture the natural existing light of city-night scenes or fireworks at night. Use a tripod or place the camera on another firm support, and use high-speed film because the shutter speed at night will most likely be slow.
  1. Open the LENS COVER/FLASH to raise the flash and to turn the camera ON.
  2. Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON repeatedly until the NIGHTTIME-VIEW INDICATOR without flash appears on the LCD PANEL.
  3. Frame your picture in the VIEWFINDER EYEPIECE.
  4. Press and hold the SHUTTER BUTTON for 12 seconds without lifting your finger. Note: If you remove your finger from the shutter button before 12 seconds, the shutter will time out immediately.
  5. After 12 seconds, release the shutter button to take the picture.
0helpful
1answer

Shutter Speed

Two things to try, 1) The release button is a two stage process. Pushing the release button 1/2 way allows the camera to focus on the subject. It needs a few milli-seconds to do this. A full depress releases the shutter, but it you don't allow the camera to focus, things get messed up.

2) Holding a camera of this type with outstretched arms is a sure way to get poor shots. I use my Fuji S5000 with the viewfinder rather than the LCD display for framing shots just like I was using an SLR/DSLR
1helpful
1answer

TROUBLESHOOTING c-750

There are a couple issues related to "slow" that I have with my C-750, and this is how I get around them.

One is the write speed to the xD card. This can prevent you from taking sequential pictures quickly, as the camera displays the current picture it is writing until it finishes. You can make the image of the current picture go away and use your viewfinder again, while the camera is writing the picture, by pressing the shutter button halfway and releasing it. Then you can see your subject in the viewfinder again!

Second is the delay between the time the shutter button is pressed and the time the shutter actually opens (when the camera actually takes the picture). This can be fixed by lining up your shot and pressing the shutter button halfway and holding it for a few seconds. This will give the camera time to adjust and lock focus, shutter speed, etc. There is a small green dot on the display below the battery indicator which will blink a few times when the button is pressed halfway, then remain on steady. When the green dot is steady, the camera is ready. Press the shutter button, and the camera should immediately take the picture.
0helpful
1answer

Blurry Pictures

There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.
0helpful
1answer

Blurry Pictures

There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.
0helpful
1answer

Blurry Pictures

There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.
0helpful
1answer

Better Focus

There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Be sure not to use Macro Mode for Normal Photography. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus (also known as 'fuzzy pictures'). 4. Rely on the LCD Monitor, especially for Telephoto and Macro photography. Due to differences in depth perception, the Viewfinder is not as accurate at the LCD Monitor. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.
0helpful
1answer

Better Focus

There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Be sure not to use Macro Mode for Normal Photography. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus (also known as 'fuzzy pictures'). 4. Rely on the LCD Monitor, especially for Telephoto and Macro photography. Due to differences in depth perception, the Viewfinder is not as accurate at the LCD Monitor. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.
0helpful
1answer

Blurry Pictures

There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.
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Pentax IqZoom 700 film camera E9 error shutter failure Hi, I have a pentax iqzoom 700 that I'd like to repair myself but E9 appears on the lcd screen after inserting a new battery and powering on. Other posts mention this is a shutter failure. When turning on, the zoom lens extends and the outer shutter covering the outside of the lens opens. I've read tutorials that say you can sometimes fix a shutter error by causing a power outage during a shot and opening the battery door while taking a picture, but this isn't possible in my case because no shot is fired when the shutter is pressed, likely because the camera recognizes the shutter failure. I've also watched videos on how to repair leaf shutters and mechanical shutters, but the manual for this camera states the shutter is an AE between-the-lens shutter so I have no idea how to disassemble and fix this sort of thing. Looking thru the lens both thru the front of the camera and in the film compartment on the other side show a dark covering behind the lens even while the outer shutter is open covering the outer lens, which I'm assuming is the between-the-lens shutter. Ideally, I'd like to repair this myself, as there's nothing lost if I screw up and it's not worth it otherwise to take it for repair. I'm a complete novice with absolutely no prior knowledge of taking apart things, but I can follow directions so any suggestions or links to videos/tutorials would be very much appreciated Side note that I've searched the web extensively and have yet to find anything specific to repairing this camera model, and I'm not knowledgeable enough to adapt a tutorial for a different camera to this model Thanks in advance!

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