Question about Fuji FinePix S5500 Digital Camera

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1GB XD pic card..........

How do these thing work, when I compress a JPG file it does not get any smaller, does any one know, I hope there is no image quality loss, I have ordered a 1GB card and I am thinking now that I would have been better getting 2x 512MB cards.........

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Do you mean, you use Winzip or some program to compress one or more of your pictures (jpgs) into a zip file? ZIP file will not modify your JPGs, so your JPG pictures would be the same quality before and after the zip process. JPG itself is a way to compress the original picture that your camera took. On some cameras, you can specify the quality of your pictures (not only resolution), and that determines how much the camera will try to compress the original picture. See link below for example pictures of different JPG qualities. Because JPG is already a compressed file, Winzip or other compression program usually can not compress it much smaller. Some camera allows you to save the pictures in RAW mode, and there is no JPG compression there, so in theory, the picture have more details. And you would be able to use Winzip to make the file smaller. Here is a link that explains JPG in more details http://www.brycetech.com/tutor/windows/jpeg_compression.html

Posted on Sep 04, 2005

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What does the positions High,Medium. and Low on photo mode mean?


Without knowing the make and model of the camera this is only a guess, but I would say it's either the image quality or image compression for the JPEG files.

Just about every camera stores photos as JPEG files (many cameras also offer other options, but JPEG is almost universal). JPEG uses a lossy compression scheme. This means that files are compressed to save space on your memory card. This compression throws away some data. Usually this is not noticeable. For example, if one point of a blue sky comes out a different shade of blue (but still close to its neighbors). It would be noticeable if a patch of sky came out green, however.

High image quality applies minimal compression, at the expense of file size. Low image quality applies more compression, saving file space but sacrificing quality.

Compression is the other way around. High compression saves file space at the expense of quality. Low compression gives higher quality at the expense of file space.

Whether these settings on your camera determine the image quality or the image compression, I can't say. You'll have to look in the manual for your camera.

If you require further assistance, please add a comment to this question and specify the make and model of your camera.

Nov 07, 2014 | Cameras

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On my Rebel Canon t2i how do I change the images from RAW to JPEG?


when you have an image from raw, for example 3000 x 4000 pixels, and convert to jpg , it remains 3000 x 4000 pixels, so detail remains the same, but you have make sure compression is 100% 10 or 12 scale when save as export , in options, if you lower compression the pixelating becomes noticeable,

http://www.selteco.com/support/s1065.php
http://graphicssoft.about.com/od/formats...

check settings for save as export for photoshop and lightroom, keep resolution high, if images are resized to smaller 5x7 " sizes for web, maintain resolution ratio from 72 up towards 300 ppi/dpi,

Save as copy, not save for web,
http://help.adobe.com/en_US/Photoshop/11...
http://help.adobe.com/en_US/Photoshop/11...

if you were saving to limited web service site, they may decompression or lower file size quality of original image for upload,
if you have lower bandwidth service, your settings for web use may also be low for faster loading, making quality lower,

Canon Rebel T3i / EOS 600D 18mp
http://usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/produ...
http://www.canon.co.uk/For_Home/Product_...

Aug 20, 2013 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

We have a Canon EOS 500D. After using it for 18 months we suddenly have a Raw notice and cannot print photos. We dont know where this has come from or to get rid of it. Advise please.


Sounds to me as if someone has set the image "Quality" to RAW files which are more for a professional or advanced amateur use. Page 70 of your owners manual will show you how to set this "Quality" to jpg. I'm going to include a screen shot of this page because it has diagrams and instructions far better then what I can explain just in type.

Also the RAW files you have must me downloaded to your computer, opened in your image software program and converted to jpg file format before you can print, e-mail or any other "normal" thing people do with jpg format.

RAW is just that the actual raw file of the image captured where as the jpg file format is the compressed version with corrections already made in camera. RAW files need correction in post processing.

I suspect you are using the Rebel's direct printing feature which can not process RAW file format, I don't think you want to print RAW as there has been not corrections.

I know this will help.

Here is the diagrams.
T1iA1

tri3mast_243.jpg
T1iA2 diagram
tri3mast_244.jpg

Feb 20, 2011 | Canon EOS 500D / Digital Rebel T1i Digital...

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I have a Sony DCR-SR43 handycam. I am a amateur photographer. When i shoot some shots, the file size is very large (208 or so..). Is there any software to compress the file.


The size of the file depends mostly on the resolution. Higher resolution gives more detail and the picture can be printed larger without showing pixelation, but this requires more data, so the files are larger. Recent cameras offer resolutions stated in terms of 10 or 14 megapixels. That much data needs a large file to store it. Reducing the resolution in the camera settings to 5 or 3 megapixels (or less) will give you a much smaller file. In the camera, this will usually be specified in terms of pixels wide by pixels deep (e.g. 1600x1200).

You can reduce the size of a picture in a photo editing program (resize or resample), which will also reduce the resolution.

Compressing the file is not likely to help much. Usually these files are in a format (.jpg) that is already compressed. The camera may allow more than one quality of compression. You can set this to compress the pics more, but this will reduce the quality of the image and introduce more digital noise. It is also possible to increase the amount of compression when saving an edited file in a photo editor, by specifying this at the point of saving. None of these will make as large a difference as reducing the resolution by resizing.

Feb 03, 2011 | Sony Handycam DCR-SR42 Camcorder

1 Answer

How to save scanned image from MX310 to computer?


Save the scanned image as a TIFF for archiving. TIFF files can beresaved and edited without compression loss, thus maintaining the highquality of an image. If you are enlarging an original 4 x 6 photo to8.5 x 11, save the scanned image as a TIFF at 600 dpi resolution. TIFFsprovide more detail than other file formats. Scanned images for emailand posting on the Web, which are to be viewed on a monitor, should besaved as JPEGs at 75 or 100 dpi. JPEGs generate smaller file sizes,which download faster on the Internet. Increase the resolution to 150or 300 dpi only if you are emailing a scanned JPEG image for therecipient to print. Save JPEGs at the maximum quality setting.

Dec 16, 2009 | Canon PIXMA MX310 All-In-One Printer

1 Answer

Save documents to a pdf file using Canon CanoScan 25


If you are using PhotoStudio, you should be able to save as a PDF file if you use the "Save as..." option in the File menu and select the appropriate file type. If you are just wanting a smaller file, I recommend using a program like XnView (http://xnview.com - it's free) to re-save the JPG file with a lesser quality setting. I have found that a quality setting from 60 to 75 compresses the file well without introducing too many compression artifacts.
You might also consider scanning at a lower DPI (try 150) and/or resizing your scan to make the image physically smaller.

Sep 25, 2009 | Canon CanoScan LiDE 60

1 Answer

Poor graphics quality on MP4 video when uploaded to Utube


Unfortunately youtube has the nasty habit of compressing images, as well as MP4. Depending on the program you are using you might be able to increase the quality of the MP4 when you save it (MP4 compresses video into a smaller size by sacrificing pixel quality). However youtube does the same thing. The shorter (and smaller filesize) a video is, usually the less it gets compressed.

Try using DivX and save as an AVI if you have that option available. The better quality the video file the better a chance you'll have at uploading it to youtube.

Jan 01, 2009 | iiyama 18' LCD MONITOR, 1280 X 1024,...

1 Answer

Scanned files are too big


Change the file format its saving in. different formats have different compression rations. Jpg images are smaller than bmp images. simply by changing it to jpg it will be 20 times smaller. To do this when click save and the save image box appers, in the format type select jpg or gif or what ever is avilable. Play around to see what gives you the smallest size. You can also use software like Photoshop, paint, and other image editors to change the format its being saved in.

Dec 16, 2008 | HP LaserJet 3380 All-In-One Printer

1 Answer

Image Quality decrease


Um ok. first off, chill with the images being described in inches. The DSC-S40 is way too simple to get lost with. You only have 2 options to play with. One is the resolution which you want to be as high as possible unless you have some special reason for it not to be. Two is you have 2 image quality settings to choose from(Fine and Standard). choose "fine" of course for best results. yes the files size will be a bit larger, but you get the best possible image. Remeber, this is considered a cheap camera, so you want the most it can offer.

Now about the file size anomalies. Dont worry about it. Here is the only conclusion I can come up with that sounds logical. .JPG and most "compressed" image types will never be the same size if taken from a camera unless the same exact picture is shot 2 times in a row very fast witout the camera moving. files size on a compressed image depends on the amount of color variations the camera has to render into a file. The more color variations, the more data the .JPG file contains. It is natural for file sizes from a camera to differ. If you set your camera at 4M and take a picture, and then you set it to 3M and try to take the same picture again thinking it will save space, in theory this is true, but remeber how "compressed" images are rendered. You may have had only the slightest difference of light change on the next pitcture you took . This can have a significant impact on the file size, and can result in a lower res image being bigger in file size than the higher res image. Now, if you are talking a huge difference like [email protected] yet 4M gives you 500kb, then you either have it set to "standard" quality, or you are really lost in this stuff.

But anyway, I hope this is plenty of info. And makes plenty of sense to anyone who understands compressed images.

Sep 04, 2006 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-S40 Digital Camera

1 Answer

E-mailing photos


JPEG format storage is ideal for posting your photos to the Internet and for e-mailing them to friends. (It’s also useful for archiving when you've finished editing them and need to save storage space.) The compressed images still look good on-screen and contain a relatively large amount of information in the shrunken file. JPEG storage is great for maximizing space but not for maintaining image quality. If you want to get smaller files for archiving, use minimal JPEG compression (high quality/low compression). The ideal compression is lossless, which means there's no discernible drop in image quality even though the file size has decreased.

Sep 08, 2005 | HP Photosmart 120 Digital Camera

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