Question about Rockford Fosgate P3001 Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Bass control stopped working

In my attempt to re-connect the ground wire to back of the amp, it grazed the positive connection causing a big spark. After re-connecting the bass control light is on but moving the controller has no affect. Have I messed up the controller or worse yet have I screwed up something inside the amp? The bass sound appears to be locked up at the minimum.

Posted by klks on

Ad

1 Answer

Elliot

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 100 times.

    Novelist:

    An expert who has written 50 answers of more than 400 characters.

  • Expert
  • 108 Answers

On rockford amps, the bass control knob needs to be connected to get the maximum output (+18 db gain i believe). If you did this to the power wires, then yes, you may have at least damaged the bass control knob. Try replacing this to see if you get all of your gain back. If not, then you have damaged something inside the amp...maybe a capacitor or power supply inside. If that's the case, you'll need to get the amp looked at by an electronics repair technician or local stereo shop.

Posted on Aug 11, 2008

Ad

Add Your Answer

×

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

No spark from coil to distrubuter


Disconnect the ignition coil output wire at the distributor cap.
Connect a spark plug to the end of the ignition coil output wire which you just disconnected.
Connect a ground wire to the threaded portion of the spark plug.
Disconnect the ignition coil ground wire from the negative terminal on the coil (Green Wire).
Connect one end of a ground wire to the ignition coil negative terminal.
Turn the ignition switch to the ON position.
Tap the other end of the ignition coil ground wire jumper on an good grounding point (for example the battery negative terminal) and look for sparks at the spark plug that correspond to the frequency of your tapping of the ground wire.
If you have a good spark at the spark plug, the ignition coil is good.
If you don't get a good spark, check for approximately 12 VDC from the coil positive terminal (black wire) to ground with the ignition switch in the ON position. You should also get approximately 12 VDC from the coil negative terminal (Green wire) to ground
Ignition Coil Resistance Check

In addition to the test above, you may elect to perform an ignition coil resistance check as confirmation of the coil's condition.

Check the ignition coil primary coil resistance by connecting an ohmmeter between the positive (Black wire) and negative (Green wire) terminals on the coil. The resistance should be 0.4 to 0.6 ohms.
Check the ignition coil secondary coil resistance by connecting an ohmmeter between the coil output terminal and the ignition coil negative terminal. The resistance should be 5000 to 7200 ohms.

You may have a bad coil or bad ground or wire connection

Jan 23, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Is it east to replace the wire that is leaving the alternator on a hyundai santa fe 2002 2.4 engine 2 wheel drive


Hello Michael Thompson,

It is not rocket science... BUT that is a CRITICAL power
path ... precisely engineered.. (big capacity).

Never attempt ANYTHING with the battery connected...
Ground comes off FIRST... and goes back... LAST.

I ordinarily encourage doing-it-yourself...
but that wire... and your battery & major ground circuits
can cause MAJOR (life threatening) PROBLEMS if done incorrectly

A shabby connection on that path (in particular) can cause a fire and damage your power distribution (in transit).

If you have MORE than a PASSING knowledge of wire-sizes, soldering, heat-shrink, un-wrap... re-wrap... naaah.

Take a look at your dealer or rockauto.com to see if
the entire wire can be purchased...

Or even a SALVAGE YARD...

ELSE ...
LEAVE IT TO YOUR FACTORY SERVICE FOLKS

RockAuto Parts Catalog

Aug 06, 2016 | Hyundai Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

HOOKING UP THESCOSCHE 500K MICRO FARAD CAPACITOR. I LOST THE HOOK UP DIAGRAM AND DON'T WANT TO HOOK IT UP WRONG


Connect ground wire to ground. Connect positive wire to the same positive wire as the amp is. If you lost the charging resistor then connect the wire to the cap first then connect to the power source. This will keep it from sparking and damaging the plating on the connector.

Jul 31, 2016 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Replacement motor for 2000 Stratus with interchangeable one but wiring harness is on wrong side n not long enough. Switched out with my old one. Everything goes together fine. Hook up some cables n it...


the engine probly came from a diff. type of vehicle. the sensors are probly the same. i would double check my starter and alternator connections. if your talking about connecting the battery cables, if theres just a little spark when you touch the ground to the battery with the positive connected, i would say thats normal. you can, by process of elimination, you could unplug suspected components and see if this will isolate the problem if you are getting a big spark. also the engine wiring may not be causing the problem. make sure every thing in the car is turned off when checking, like dome lights and such. you can also pull diff. fuses to see if any of those circuits are causing the problem. make sure you hae a good engine ground.

Feb 22, 2015 | 2000 Dodge Stratus

1 Answer

No sound from tweeter bx5a


First of all, never connect the audio from your receiver directly to the tweeter. You can blow the tweeter instantly. The mid-bass driver can be damaged from a direct connection as well.

Since you get absolutely no sound from either driver, this seems to implicate the crossover. If the crossover has opened, no signal gets through, if it has opened early in the signal path.

But, it is also possible that a short exists, and that perhaps your amp cuts off the output having sensed a short. The short could be in the crossover or one of the drivers.

Here are some troubleshooting tips--

To prevent damage to your amp, turn it off while making or breaking any connections inside the speaker boxes.

Write down which wires get connected to which place on the drivers, so you can get them back where they belong.

With your amp turned off, connect the bad speaker to your amp. You've already verified that no sound is produced when both drivers are connected.

So, with your amp off, disconnect one wire from the tweeter in the bad box.

Briefly turn your amp on and listen for sound.

If you get sound, the tweeter is shorted.

If you get no sound, with the amp off, reconnect the tweeter in the bad box and disconnect one wire from the mid-bass driver.

Briefly turn the amp on and listen before turning the amp off.

If you get sound now, but not before, the mid-bass driver is shorted.

If you got no sound either way, check the DC resistance of the mid-bass driver (only, not the tweeter. Ohmmeters put out a small DC voltage to test resistance. That DC voltage might damage a tweeter, maybe. Don't risk it). Ohm the mid-bass driver while it is not connected to the crossover. If the driver is good, you should read some ohms--a little less than the stated impedance. An 8 ohm driver might read 6.5 ohms, for instance. If you get an open or a short (with the crossover disconnected from the mid-bass driver) you have a blown driver. Two actually, since neither the tweeter nor the mid-bass driver produced any sound in the previous tests.

If you can't get ahold of an ohmmeter, try this--

Open the good, working speaker and place the two side by side.

Connect your amp to the bad speaker box only.

With your amp turned off, disconnect the wires from the mid-bass driver in the bad box and connect them to the mid-bass driver in the good box. Disconnect one of the wires from the "good" mid-bass driver first, so you don't have two crossovers connected to it at the same time--even if only one of them will get powered on. It keeps the confusion down to a minimum when trying to isolate your problem. Oh, and disconnect one wire from the bad tweeter, in case it is shorted.

Turn the amp on and listen briefly before turning the amp off.

If you got sound, the "bad" crossover is fine, but the "bad" mid-bass driver is blown. And, since you got no sound in the previous tests, the "bad" tweeter is blown, as well.

If you got no sound, try it the other way around. Meaning--

With the amp off, disconnect the speaker wires coming from your amp from the bad speaker box and connect them to the good speaker box.

Your amp is now connected only to the good speaker box.

With the amp still off, connect the mid-bass wires from the good box to the mid-bass driver in the bad box. Remember to disconnect one of the "bad" crossover wires from its own driver first, so only one crossover is connected to the "bad" mid-midbass driver. Remember to disconnect one wire from the "good" and "bad" tweeters, so the only sound you hear--if any--is from the "bad" mid-bass driver, powered by the "good" crossover.

If this produces sound, but the previous attempts failed, you have a crossover problem.

If you still get no sound, something went wrong and you need to retest the good speaker by itself and back up a few steps and try again.

Assuming you got sound from the "good" crossover while it was driving your "bad" mid-bass, make sure no wires have come loose inside the "bad" box. Assuming you have sound connections at each end of each wire, you now need to desolder the electrolytic capacitors from the circuit board.

Make sure you mark them first, so you can put them back where they belong.

You can remove only one at a time, if that helps.

Use an ohmmeter to check some components.

The big red coil should read pretty close to a short, maybe one ohm.

The capacitors should read open or infinite resistance, although you might see a steadily increasing resistance while the capacitor charges up from the ohmmeter. If you read a steady low resistance on a capacitor after it has been removed from the circuit board, that capacitor is bad and must be replaced. The markings on the capacitor should give you some clues as to the proper replacement.

All things considered, I suspect that your problem is a shorted electrolytic capacitor. But, I gave you all I could think of so you can narrow it down and isolate the problem, whatever it might be.

I hope this helps.

Feb 23, 2011 | M-Audio BX5a Speaker

1 Answer

My hifonics am 1208d is sparking every time I connect the ground wire! Seems that the ground connection on my amp has mysteriously turnt to a positive? Please help, how can I diy fix the amp my self? I...


Try reversed the connection, hang the positive supply together with the ground. Then connect the ground first before the positive supply. If the spark is still there then you are confirmed that you have a short on the unit. Fixing is not DIY because it is quite technical. I rather suggest to send it to a repair shop to isolate the shorted parts. A series of test will be perform to locate where the short come from.
Please rate my advice.
Thanks for using fixya...

Jan 09, 2011 | Hifonics Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

I have a boss bass 1200 low profile amplified sub that isn't working. my power wires connected and receives juice, my ground is grounded, and my remote is hooked up. also my rcas are connected and the...


+ positive from battery ground is of course - anywhere on body put it on last.to avoid sparks if + is powered up! U can put a link between remote and positive it should then be on. Led normally goes blue rca s need a signal from stereo make sure its a amp out or sub out not an input on stereo set all knobs to middle and if speaker is connected to amp speaker + - it should be on, try an mp3 player with jack to rca for testing a known signal.amp may have loop rca make sure its on inputs.some have high inputs too using speakers wire stick with rca

Jan 17, 2018 | Boss Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

The main problem I have having is I am getting power to my AMP but no power to the subs. I tested my AMP and subs in another car and everything worked so I know my hardware all works fine. I had someome...


okay , well you need to make sure all your conections are in the right spots, and that your IN LINE FUSE, between your amp and battery, the big glass one is not burnt, just take a look at the metal piece inside , if its a sold metal piece its good, if its burnt in half like a broken bridge it needs to be replaced. the next thing is the fuse on your amp, you need to make sure it is not burnt also. Check your remote that it is hooked up to the right wire. then check that your sub/speaker wires are connected properly and secure. YOUR GROUND WIRE IS HUGE HERE also. MAKE SURE IT IS GROUNDED TO A GOOD SPOT, YOU MAY HAVE TO MOVE IT AROUND A FEW TIMES TO FIND A GOOD GROUND!!!! if you check all of these things, it should work fine.. you can fiddle with your amp and bass settings levels. turn em up so when it works you know it, but not too much you dont wanna blow nothing :)

Mar 12, 2010 | Car Audio & Video

5 Answers

My speakers do not work but my subs do.


Good day sir, hi, there reason why speakers don't work could either be the folowing:
  1. you speaker voice coil is burnt, to test, you need to get the door speakers out and locate the terminals, prepare a 1.5 double AA battery, use this to test you speaker. connect a wire from the negative of the battery to the negative of the speaker, and the positive battery to the positive terminal of the speaker with a series of gentle taps, you should hear clicking sound. if not replace the speaker.
a9b085b.gif Do it on the other door speaker.

2. check your speaker line from the amplifier to the door speaker.
3. check your power amplifier for loose and improper connection.
4. check your power amplifier itself. Thats it.

Its a little work, visit your local electronic repair shop if your speaker still won't work.

Oct 08, 2009 | Car Audio & Video

1 Answer

Amp doesn't come on


Hello rheabarb,

You did not say whether or not you checked the wiring going to your subs. Many times, a shorted or grounded speaker wire will cause an amp to fail. And if the amp powers up OK with the subs disconnected, I'd suspect one or more of the wires.

Hope this helps.

May 19, 2009 | Clarion APX1300 Subwoofer Mono Amp - 300W...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Rockford Fosgate P3001 Car Audio Amplifier Logo

Related Topics:

224 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Rockford Fosgate Car Audio & Video Experts

Marvin
Marvin

Level 3 Expert

85239 Answers

Daniel Dollive
Daniel Dollive

Level 3 Expert

315 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

76466 Answers

Are you a Rockford Fosgate Car Audio and Video Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...