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I have a Fisher RS-909 Surrond Sound amplifier. It has no "sub out" jack. I had the sub-woofer working in the past by wiring it as shown in the manual. The problem is that the system was in storage for ten years and I have lost the original manual. I have re-connected the system but cannot get the sub-woofer to work. The speaker system is a Polk Audio RM5300. I have attempted to configure the system as depicted in the Polk Audio manual but this does not work. I recall that the required configuration was really unusual, but I cannot recall the exact configuration required to get the Sub-Woofer to work. As far as I have been able to determine, the Fisher RS909 Surround Sound manual is not available. What I need is the schematic diagram depicting the Sub-Woofer connection for these components. My only other option would be to purchase a new Surrond Sound amplifier, which I don't really want to do; since in all other respects, this one works just fine.

Posted by qsikjr on

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block_p14

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Adding to the question on this one. Have this same amp but have never had the original speakers. Am I to assume when you say that the sub is wored to the left and right surround that the original unit was dual coil or if not how does that work?

Posted on Jul 27, 2012

  • block_p14
    block_p14 Jul 27, 2012

    Adding to the question on this one. Have this same amp but have never had the original speakers. Am I to assume when you say that the sub is wored to the left and right surround that the original unit was dual coil or if not how does that work?

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mark woodring

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Alright i had a chance to look over things, this is how you are going to hook up the sub. first we'll be connecting the surround sound unit to the sub woofer.
surround sound unit sub woofer
left front: positive (+) <-----to------------->(+) left speaker level in
negative ( - )<- - -to- - - - - - ->( - ) left speaker level in

right front: positive (+) <-----to------------->(+) right speaker level in
negative ( - )<- - -to- - - - - - >( - ) right speaker level in

now that the surround sound unit is connected to the sub woofer you will need to connect the front surround sound speakers to the sub woofer.
sub woofer front surround sound speaker
left speaker level out (+)<-----to--------> (+) left front speaker
left speaker level out( - ) <- - - to- - - - ->( - ) left front speaker

right speaker level out (+)<-----to--------> (+) right front speaker
right speaker level out( - ) <- - - to- - - ->( - ) right front speaker

Alright now that the wires are all over the place and plugged in
turn everything on and see how it sounds. let me know if everything is working as it should. if you need help with anything else or if something does not seem right please feel free to contact me via e-mail or phone
Mark Woodring

Posted on Feb 14, 2011

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1 Answer

I want to install a self powered woofer and tap it to the rear speakers. Can you please tell me what are the colors and polarity of the rear speaker wires for 2006 Honda odyssey right hand drive


FIRST OF ALL --- THERE IS A FEW THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE HOOKING UP
A WOOFER LIKE THIS ---- IS THIS A STORE BOUGHT POWERED SUB WOOFER ? DOES IT HAVE IT'S OWN CROSSOVER BUILT INSIDE ?? I WOULD GUESS IT NEEDS TO BE HOOKED
UP TO A SUB WOOFER OUTPUT FOUND ON THE BACK OF THE IN DASH PLAYER ..
THE WOOFER NEEDS TO RECEIVE ONLY LOW FREQUENCY AUDIO WHICH MOST OF THE NEWER CAR STEREOS PROVIDE BY AN RCA JACK ON A SHORT WIRE COMING OUT OF THE STEREO ...
IF YOU TRY AND TAP IT TO FULL RANGE SPEAKERS THAT ALREADY ARE CONNECTED TO AN AMPLIFIED SIGNAL THE SOUND WILL BE DISTORTED .......
POWERED SUB WOOFERS NEED A LINE LEVEL INPUT WHICH IS MUCH LOWER THAN SAY
SPEAKERS ALREADY RECEIVING AN AMPLIFIED SIGNAL.
POWERED WOOFER WILL ALSO NEED TO HAVE A 12 VOLT ELECTRICAL CONNECTION AND A GROUND WIRE TO OPERATE THE AMPLIFIER BUILT INSIDE.
IF YOU HAVE NO EXPERIENCE WITH THIS TYPE OF HOOK UP I WOULD STRONGLY RECOMMEND SOMEONE WHO DOES [ CAR AUDIO SHOP ]

Jun 29, 2011 | Car Audio & Video

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I need a wiring diagram from car stereo to 2 x 6 " x 9 " and a sub woofer please


You can connect the two 6x9 speakers to the two individual left and right outputs of the car stereo.
Connect each of the left and right channel with the correct polarity . Now the Sub-woofer requires an amplifier to be connected separately and so you need to use the car stereo to be linked to a sub woofer amp which powers the sub woofer.

Mar 26, 2011 | Car Audio & Video

2 Answers

Which jacks to wire the subwoofer to?


Your receiver should have an RCA connector on the back panel that will be marked "sub woofer" or "LFE out". That connects to your sub woofer with a standard RCA type cable. Also, some powered subs have left and right speaker level inputs and outputs in which you would indeed run the sub woofer through the speaker outputs. The down side of that type of connection is that the line level converter inside the sub woofer will take a slight amount of your receiver's output power, although that is rarely detectable. Also, if you have a Dolby Digital receiver, using this connection method will take away systems ability to accurately control the low frequency effects of a soundtrack.

Good Luck,
BB

May 16, 2009 | Kenwood Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I have a Panasonic twin subwoofer system. 7000w PMPO, 600w Rms multi amp system. With 2 main speakers, 2 woofers and 2 surrond speakers. The system is not working but the speakers are working properly.Is...


Yes it would be possible, acquire a home receiver or amplifier with either a crossover or an equalizer to filter out the high signals for the subs and is should work fine. Of course if the impedance does not match you do not want to blast the sound through them.

Mar 06, 2009 | Sony Xplod XM-1652Z Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

SUB WOOFER PROBLEMS


design u r aucostics properly

Jan 10, 2009 | Infinity BU-80 Speaker

2 Answers

Subwoofer probelm


I suspect you have a bad cable, a poor ground or a bad
power supply inside the speaker amplifier. The amplifier
(inside the sub-woofer) could also be defective.
===
1) Bad cable or connector:
If the (braided shield/outer tube) of the coaxial input cable is
not grounded, the cable will pickup line frequency "hum"
from surrounding power lines, house wires, lights and
appliances.

This hum is then amplified by the speaker's amplifier
causing the constant bass sound you speak of.

Because the hum frequency fundamental is 60 Hertz in
North America, 50 Hertz in Europe, you hear it coming
mostly out of the sub-woofer, because the midrange and
high speaker circuits filter it out.

Check the input connectors, cable at both ends, wiggle
the jacks at a low volume setting to see if it changes.

Make sure that you are indeed using a properly shielded
coaxial cable.

A coaxial cable consists of a thin inner conductor, surrounded
by a flexible tube made up of a braided metal shield, which
must be grounded. This prevents hum from being picked up
by the sensitive amplifier inputs.
===

2) If the power supply within the sub-woofer's internal amplifier
is defective, the the power supply hum will also get coupled
into the amplifier and speaker with same results as above.

Power supply hum is typically twice the line frequency,
i.e. 120 Hertz, but not always, depending on what
component failed: Rectifier diode, filter capacitor, or
the voltage regulator.

3) Ground loops:
When you run very long cables between the source and
destination of an audio signal, multiple ground paths (must)
exist between the two points in space, creating complete
loop circuits.

Power line hum from the environment can (will) induce
heavy AC currents around these loops, creating a voltage
gradient across these cables, and in-between the end
devices.

Once again, this AC hum is coupled into the amplifier inputs.

Ground loops become a problem with cables over 10
feet long, and an astronomical problem for stage audio
engineers. To avoid ground loops, they must break
the circuit's continuity by using isolation transformers,
optical isolators, and/or differential input amplifiers.

So how long are your cables?

Most house stereo components are only designed to
handle 6 to 10 feet of cabling max.

30 feet is already asking for major trouble.

4) Feed back oscillation: This occurs when the output of
an amplifier is fed back to the inputs with a round trip
gain greater or equal to unity. The tiniest little electrical
disturbance is then amplified and re-amplified, over and
over again, usually at one preferred frequency, causing
the typical (ear-splitting) microphone squeal or howl.

In your situation feedback and/ loss of original signal
could be the result of mis-wiring the input cables.

Note that this is NOT as silly nor as unlikely as it sounds,
because many computer audio cards and even some
home stereo systems have re-configurable inputs and
outputs.

SOFTWARE configuration decides which jack at the
back does what !!!!

On my computer, for example, the Realtek audio driver
tries to automatically figure out what cable is connected
to each jack (usually it gets it wrong)

Using the Realtek control panel applet, I can then
manually re-configure the gray jack as input,
the green jack as bass, pink jack as center.... etc.

If this situation also applies to your system, please check
the software configuration. Connecting an output cable to
an input jack will certainly cause a lot of HUM and not
much music.

5) Finally, don't rule out internal sub-woofer failure. Unlike
the passive stereo/hi-fi speakers of days gone by, modern
multi-channel theater systems with front, center, rear and
sub-woofer speakers are internally amplified, with active
frequency cross-over filters and special effect/ surround
sound capabilities.

Usually, the large sub-woofer contains most of the
electronics, amplifiers and filters.

It feeds the other speakers, and it is controlled by
an external volume control module which can be separate
or built into one of the tweeters.

These sub-woofer electronics are prone to poor design,
overheating and early failure. (Even fresh out of the box
like yours)

If you cannot get it working, take it back to the store,
and make the NICE salesmen **** with it.

Good luck
Please rate my answers
Martin.

Jul 20, 2008 | Yamaha 5.1-Ch. Surround Sound Home Theater...

1 Answer

Woofer problem


If I am not mistaking here, you need a self powered subwoofer to use with this unit. Those are line driven outputs for this unit. Make sure there is a wall plug on the sub that is plugged in. Good Luck

Jun 07, 2007 | Pioneer VSX-516-K/S Amplifier

1 Answer

How do i connect non passive woofer


This receiver can only take a self powered subwoofer I'm afraid. You could get a power amp and power the sub like that but in the long run I really think you would be happyer to get a new subwoofer. Good Luck

Jun 07, 2007 | Pioneer VSX-516-K/S Amplifier

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