Question about Cub Cadet Garden

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I have a 2006 Cub Cadet RZT 42 Zero Turn Mower that keeps blowing the fuse. It would blow the fuse after long periods of use but it's gotten shorter and shorter between fuse blowing. Now it blows the fuse almost immediately after starting the mower. Any ideas as to what's causing this??

Posted by gary_norton on

  • gary_norton Nov 08, 2010

    No, the PTO isn't on when it would blow. I've removed the complete wiring harness, checked each and every wire. No frayed wires anywhere. Checked all the switches all seem to be working fine. (including the ign. switch). Checked all engine wiring, stator, coil wire and carb solenoid wire.. all good. Put it all back together and now the fuse won't blow.!! What should the voltage at the battery be with the engine running? And what should the voltage be at the regulator?...it has three output tabs on it.

  • gary_norton Nov 18, 2010

    Hey roadtech7 ... what does it mean if I'm getting 14.1 volts DC both at the center terminal of the regulator and the battery (regardless of engine speed) and 23.5 volts AC on one of the outer terminals of the regulator and 0 volts AC on the other???

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Matt Olenzek

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You have a wire that is grounding out, I would check the wire coming from the connector on the voltage regulator to the battery. This is the one in the middle position, look for a rub through and tape it up.

If you need further help, I’m available over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/matt_8dbc24bf722649ac

Posted on Nov 03, 2010

Testimonial: "roadtech7 was SUPER helpful and very patient. A very knowledgeable tech. Thank for all the help pardoner! "

  • 8 more comments 
  • gary_norton Nov 04, 2010

    Nope! ... not a frayed wire.... all wires look good.... a bad rectifier / regulator maybe?

  • Matt Olenzek
    Matt Olenzek Nov 07, 2010

    Try diconnecting the regulator and strat the tractor, this will let you know it it is suspect.

    Is the PTO on when it is blowing?

  • gary_norton Nov 08, 2010

    No, the PTO isn't on when it would blow. I've removed the complete wiring harness, checked each and every wire. No frayed wires anywhere. Checked all the switches all seem to be working fine. (including the ign. switch). Checked all engine wiring, stator, coil wire and carb solenoid wire.. all good. Put it all back together and now the fuse won't blow.!! What should the voltage at the battery be with the engine running? And what should the voltage be at the regulator?...it has three output tabs on it.

  • Matt Olenzek
    Matt Olenzek Nov 09, 2010

    The voltage at the battery should be around 13.5 volts at wide open throttle. The voltage should read the same or slightly higher at the center terminal on the voltage regulator. The two outer terminals at the voltage regulator are measured in AC volts not DC. they should read between 25 and 35 volts.

    Im glad your fuse problem is gone......But you have to wonder why. I had a mower once that did that, until i found that the head lamp wire was touching the muffler and causing it to blow.

    Hope this helps

  • gary_norton Nov 09, 2010

    Thanks a bunch for the information! ... I'm getting 19.3 volts at the battery... wide open or at idle and 19.3 at the center terminal on the regulator. And like I said earlier, I couldn't find a frayed wire anywhere. The RZT doesn't have headlights so no wires there to check. I'm thinking that I've got a bad regulator but even so it still hasn't blown the fuse since I put the wiring harness back on it.
    AND you're right ... the fact that the fuse isn't blowing anymore and that I didn't find the reason it WAS ... is driving me crazy!!!

  • Matt Olenzek
    Matt Olenzek Nov 10, 2010

    I should have asked you from the begining to check the output voltage. The regulator you have is most likley a 15 amp, If it failed it could have been putting as much as 30 amps to the battery. This would be the cause of the fuse blowing (and cooking your battery, and blowing any light bulbs.......if you had any. Sorry about the headlamp delema, I was thinking of a 1046 that i ran into that problem.). It is most likley a 20 amp fuse (yellow) right? If this is the case the 12 gauge wire coming from the center terminal could handle the load, but the fuse, could'nt. The amperage would heat abd blow the fuse while it tried to pack the increased voltage through, well a hole that was too small ( the 20 amp fuse), and would raise the resitance to the point of over heating the fuse.

  • Matt Olenzek
    Matt Olenzek Nov 10, 2010

    You rated me with a 1? out of 5 ? WOW, sorry i thought i was at least a little helpfull.

  • gary_norton Nov 10, 2010

    Hey roadtech7, ... I'm new on this site, ...I don't remember rating at all ...but as you see from the "testimonial" ... I'm very appreciative. And DID rate you as very helpful. Thanks again for all of your help.

  • gary_norton Nov 18, 2010

    Hey roadtech7 ... what does it mean if I'm getting 14.1 volts DC both at the center terminal of the regulator and the battery (regardless of engine speed) and 23.5 volts AC on one of the outer terminals of the regulator and 0 volts AC on the other???

  • Matt Olenzek
    Matt Olenzek Nov 18, 2010

    Hello,

    It means that the charging system is replacing the lost voltage from the battery and any load you may have on the tractor. It is the perfect balance.

    If you charge you battery with a battery charger, and it charges until it is taking o amps, it is fully charged it will have abourt 13 volts. Then when you put it in the tractor and start it, it will only charge at about 12 to 13 volts until it replaces the voltage used to crank the tractor.

    But a charging system showing between 13 and 14.5 is great. It shows you that the voltage regulator and stator are working correctly. The RPM difference from idle to full throttle is minimal.

    As far as the AC volts go, The one side is the charging coil (stator), and the other side is the lighting coil (stator). And you dont have one, so no voltage on that side.

    If you were to pull the flywheel, you will only find a half moon shaped stator, that is the charging coil,The other half would be the lighting coil.

    Hope this explains it,
    Thanks again for the feed back.

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