Question about Canon EOS-20D Digital Camera

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Image quality Hi. When I'm taking photos and set my exposure manually on my Canon 20D, the image looks right exposed on my LCD screen, but when I download all the photos on my PC, all the photos are VERY DARK. This takes lots of time for me to edit it and then after I've got the right brightness on my PC I discovered that the image quality is VERY BAD!!! There is lots of noise on the image. Can someone help me to find a solution to correct the exposure on my camera, so that I can save time on my PC when editing my photos?

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Hello there,
If you are correctly metering the exposure of your photos, and you suspect it may be the camera, try resetting the camera to its default settings using the menu. Clearing all the custom functions as well can sometimes help. I have seen some cameras get "stuck" into a weird shooting mode. Also, don't always trust your LCD. It is only there for reference, but is almost never a true representation of what you're going to get. 
Hope this helps!

Posted on Mar 13, 2009

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PICTURES ARE BLACK


6 Ways To Fix Too Bright and Too Dark Photos

Recompose The Photo This is probably the simplest solution. When taking a photo of a scene with very bright and very dark parts, move your camera to eliminate one of the extremes. In the case of the band, I would have either closed the curtains for the shot, or recomposed completely and photographed from the window looking at the band, and the crowd behind.
Use Exposure Lock If you can't recompose the photograph, instead tell the camera what part of the image you would like to see. The rest of the photo will be either over or under exposed (too bright or too dark) but at least you will see your subject. You can dothis by placing the center of the image at your subject; half depressing the shutter to lock the focus and exposure; move the camera to re-compose the image; and fully depressing the shutter.
In the band image, the camera chose to correctly expose the scene outside, but even if the band member had been correctly exposed, the window would have ended up being over exposed and you would just have seen white.
Some cameras have an option called 'spot metering' to set the part of the image you'd like to be correctly exposed. If your camera has this setting, enable it before using the technique above.
Use Fill In Flash If your scene has a sunny background, but your subject is in the shade (or has a hat on), turn on the flash (as I explained way back in tip number 9 - Using Flash During The Day). I know it seems wrong but it really does work! By using the flash, your subject will look as bright as the background. This would have worked well for the child shot above.
High Dynamic Range Imaging This technique is not for the faintof hearted. It requires a subject that does not move; a good camera with the capability to set the exposure and output RAW images. A tripod and image editing software like Photoshop CS3 are also needed.
High Dynamic Range Imaging (or HDR for short) is a technique for placing both very dark and very light areas in the same photo. It requires you to take a number of photographs of thesame scene - each with a different exposure. First take the shot using the camera's recommended settings. Then, in manual mode and keeping the aperture at the same value as the first shot, take a sequence of shots - each shot having a different shutter speed (above and below the original). You'll have 5-9 shots of the same scene all in different exposures.
hdrunder.jpghdrmean.jpghdrover.jpg
Merging the three images to the left creates the HDR image below. Thanks to Photomatix for the images.
hdrmerged.jpgNow import these into your favorite paint program. I use Photoshop, but you can as easily use a cheaper program designed specifically for HDR photos like Photomatix. Follow the HDR directions and the paint program will merge these images into one great looking shot!
Use a Filter If your scene is of a brightsky and a dark ground (for instance at sunset, or on a cloudy day), you can use a graduated neutral density filter. This filter cuts out someof the light from one part of the photo (the sky). This will correctly expose the ground and the sky without needing to use HDR. These filterscan be complex to setup, so I don't usually recommend them for beginners.
Fix The Original Photo in an Image Editing Program twobright2.jpgFinally, if you can't take another shot at the same location, you can fix the original image by changing the levels using a paint program. This works best when your subject is darker than the rest of the photo (because cameras lose detail in over-bright areas). I've brightened the band member in the top image using this technique and while it looks okay in thissmall shot, this technique can tend to amplify any noise in the image. The darker the subject, the harder time you will have fixing the image.
I discuss exactly how to use this technique in lesson 2 of my free Image Editing Secrets course. I have a tutorial for Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Paint Shop Pro and the free Google Picassa.
- See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/140/6-ways-to-fix-too-bright-and-too-dark-photos/#sthash.58eENOTt.dpuf

Jul 09, 2014 | Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

All of a sudden the images my camera is taking look totally overexposed, is it possible that i switched some setting without knowing? why is there so much light in my pictures?


Yes, there is a setting called exposure compensation, which you may have altered.
Try switching the camera back to A (Auto) mode, and see if that fixes it.
In the manual setting modes, exposure compensation will look like this:
http://images.digitalcamerainfo.com/images/upload/Image/new/Photokina08/Canon/sd880is/photos/Canon-sd880is-menu-functionset-375.jpg
Make sure that you haven't set the exposure compensation to +2, for example. It should usually be set on 0.

Mar 03, 2011 | Canon PowerShot A590 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

My nikon D60 is taking dark photos.


The only reason the camera will be taking dark photos is when it is under exposing the image taken. This can be due to the exposure compensation set to under expose the metered exposure. Make sure the expsosure compensation is set to '0' or increase it to compensate for the dark photos.

Also inaccurately metering a scene (such as a high contrast scene) can easily fool the meter into under exposing, especially outdoors.

Jan 03, 2010 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera with 18-55mm +...

1 Answer

Canon Rebel XTi over exposes images in auto setting


Try in reset the camera to factory settings.

If still you have a problem, then try with a different lens.


Best regards,

Jul 09, 2009 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

Outdoor photos are all over exposed and white. Video works fine.


set ur screen first .click one image 1st load on ur pc. see the screen and pc screen then set ur screen brightness and contrast of ur camera

Jun 17, 2009 | Mitsuba DV505 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Hi all, I wonder if you can supply some advice regarding a Sigma17-35mm lens I purchased earlier in the year. Basically if I use the automatic or 'P' setting on my Canon EOS 30D camera the image is over...


Try your EOS in AV (aprature value) mode. You should be able to adjust your aperature value in 1/3 or 1/2 steps dependind how you have your Custom Functions set in your camera's menu. Possibly the lens you purchased is for an EOS 35mm. If you use a 35mm lens on your eos there are some calculations you must use. When using a 35mm lens on the EOS 20D, 30D, 40D and 50D bodies, you must first calculate your focal leingth by 1.6 times. With this, your exposure changes as well.

The only EOS Digital SLR bodies that use a 35mm x 24mm CMOS sensor are the 1D and 5D. My wife uses a Tamron 18-200mm f3.5-5.6 lens on her 20D and loves it.

If this makes no difference, you may have a defective lens.

Nov 29, 2008 | Sigma Cameras

2 Answers

Canon Powershot S330 Picture Brightness Help!!!


It sounds like the camera exposure system is out of whack and may need to be serviced. You may want to ensure that exposure compensation is set to 0. Check one of your overexposed images with the display in the 'Detailed Display' mode (two lines of information at the bottom of the LCD). If the second item on the top line is not ±0, the exposure compensation is not at its default value. To set, put the camera in M(anual) shooting mode. Press the Exposure/White Balance button until you see a scale along the bottom of the LCD from -2 to +2. Use the left or right button to set it at 0. If the value is already at 0, you will probably need service.

Apr 28, 2008 | Canon PowerShot S330 / IXUS 330 Digital...

3 Answers

Hook 20d camera to computer


new dells are presently shipped with 'vista'. when you connect your camera directly to the computer is should find the camera and ask you if you want to download the images. the camera must be turned on after you connect it.you can use explore to look for the camera. alternately use a card reader for usb 2 if you have a usb 2 port. all new dells have them. download time is much shorter with usb 2.
to access 'explore' simply right click on the start icon and select explore. it will bring up a tree and you can from there find your devices and drives.
good luck
mark

Dec 07, 2007 | Canon EOS 20Da Digital Camera

1 Answer

20d photos looking washed out/cloudy


you may have an exposure compensation setting set above 0. it will produce such results. consult your manual for resetting exposure compensation. my guess is that you are about 1 to 2 f stops high. bringing it back to 0 will usually correct issue.
other poss. is white balance set to a custom setting that is irregular. this is less likely the issue.
assume you tried with various lenses and reproduced the results.
is it a genuine canon lens? possibly an 'L' series? you may have a contact problem from lens to camera. unlikely, but cleaning the contact points with a glass cleaning cloth and lens cleaner should eliminate that as an issue.
i am confident you have an exposure compensation setting issue. start there after you check the basics mentioned.
good luck
mark

Nov 05, 2007 | Canon EOS 20Da Digital Camera

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