Question about Philips GoGear HDD1830 MP3 Player

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Philips GoGear mp3

I just purchased and downloaded 5 songs that are wma files just like the rest of the songs that I put on my mp3 player from cd's. The songs show up on my mp3 player but they won't play. It just sits there with the pause symbol - when you press play it just goes back to the pause symbol and doen not play the song at all. The songs do play on my computer just fine. Why can't I listen to them on my Philips GoGear mp3 player?

Posted by rebbs on

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Anonymous

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Sounds like the files are DRM copy protected.

You can check for protected tracks.

  • In Windows Explorer, go to the folder where the tracks are stored on your PC.
  • Click on View -----> Details
  • Right click on the header bar in the right hand window and select protected. (If protected is not listed click on More)
  • Tracks will be listed with No or Yes under "protected". Check your non-playing tracks are listed as No, under "protected".
The HDD1830 is not compatible with protected files, although your PC will play them ok.

Posted on Mar 02, 2008

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My sons got a mw249s from their mom for xmas. i have itunes istheir anyway to put itunes music on the player? I tryed drag and drop the device showed the music loaded but cant play it.


You will first need to delete all the music from your MP3 player that you put on it. Use this method to do that: Hook up your mp3 player to your computer Go to your desktop and double left click on "My Computer" When it opens you will see listing that says "Devices with Removal Storage" your mp3 player should be listed there. Right click on your mp3 player, and a window will open, right click on "Open" and now your files/songs should be visible. Hold the left click down and drag it across all the files/songs that you do not want this will highlight the files/songs you do not want, release, right click and then click on "Delete" Now you mp3 player should be clear of the files/songs you do not want. BE CAREFUL AND DO NOT DELETE THE FILES NEEDED TO OPERATE YOUR MP3 PLAYER. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- I tunes is an AAC format, it will not work with your player... You need WMA format to make the songs work on the GPX-MW3836 What you can do is covert the songs from ACC to WMA using a format converter. Then put them in a folder/file and drag and drop them to the player, or download the songs to Windows Media Player after you have converted them and then download them to your player, as Windows Media Player is WMA format. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- You can download a free format converter at this website: www.formatoz.com/ Good Luck, I hope this helped Please rate me, Thanks

Dec 26, 2009 | GPX MW3836 MP3 Player

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Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part II by Tha Mp3 Doctor WMA files are...


Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part II
by Tha Mp3 Doctor

WMA files are special. There are two types of WMA file, and the Mp3 or digital Audio Player documentation will not always tell which of these two types the Mp3 player will recognize. Type I is a non-licensed, or non-DRM-protected WMA file. DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is Microsoft’s copyright system for music files. If you have a type of Mp3 player that will only accept non-DRM protected files, the product specs for your player will NOT mention the words "DRM" or "Windows Plays ForSure" on them (unless they are using it in the negative, such as "this player does NOT support DRM encryption"). In MOST cases (there are more and more exceptions), Windows Media Player will convert songs from CD’s that you personally bought from the store into non-DRM encrypted WMA format.

The second type of WMA file is a DRM-encrypted WMA file, and there are several subtypes of these. Every DRM-encrypted file can have "play rights," "burn rights," and "transfer rights." "Play rights" mean you can play the song on your computer, "burn rights" mean you can burn the song to CD, and "transfer rights" mean you can transfer the song to your Mp3 player. Once again, not all WMA files are created equal. If you have a BASIC subscription to a music service such as Napster, you may download songs that have "play rights" – you can play them on your computer without any problem; but they may lack burn rights and transfer rights – so you cannot burn them to CD, or transfer them to your Mp3 player without incident. The solution here is to upgrade your music service to the premium, more expensive subscription that includes burn rights and transfer rights.

Then there are "fixed-term" licenses and "unlimited" licenses on WMA files. A fixed-term license will expire after so many days, months, or years; and will require you to resynchronize your songs to the music service or to your computer in order to continue playing them. This is a key reason behind songs "disappearing." Napster and Rhapsody are two examples of music services with fixed-term licenses. You must resynchronize your Mp3 player to your computer every 30 days, and you must keep you music service subscription active. If you let your subscription lapse, then the songs that were once working will no longer be playable. Once again, the only remedies are to renew your music service subscription (legal), convert those songs into a different format that the Mp3 player will recognize (possibly illegal), or to use DRM-removal software (illegal and unreliable).

One word needs to be said about burning your own personal CD’s and transferring them to the Mp3 player. CD’s naturally put song files into CDA format. Most Mp3 players do not recognize CDA format. So you will have to use Windows Media Player (easiest, IMO) or some other software to convert the CDA files into Mp3, WMA, or some other format that your Mp3 player recognizes, BEFORE you can transfer them to the Mp3 player.

Real Audio files also have an encryption system, and may not work with most Mp3 players – check your product documentation.

Audiobooks are in their own format and bring their own special problems which fall outside the scope of this article.

There are a ton of music services out there. iTunes uses AAC format. Napster, Rhapsody, Bearshare, Spiral Frog, and many others use DRM-protected WMA format nowadays. Limewire and Morpheus generally use Mp3 or non-DRM-encrypted files. Double check the formats that your player will support BEFORE choosing a music service. Conversely, if you already have a music service, choose an mp3 player that’s right for your particular service. Note: most store workers do not have the faintest idea of what I have been discussing in this article, so don’t trust their judgment – educate yourself first.

AS A GENERAL RULE OF THUMB (as always, there are exceptions), all Mp3 players recognize the Mp3 file format. The Mp3 file format is the least problematic of all the file formats. It takes up less space on your Mp3 player than most file formats – so you can load more songs onto your player than if you were using other formats. So, if you download all of your songs into Mp3 format, or tell Windows Media Player to convert your own CD’s into Mp3 format, then you will rarely go wrong.

on Jun 09, 2008 | iRiver H340 MP3 Player

1 Answer

I downloaded music onto my element gc-820 then go to listen and it says no file what the hell


The following may help:
- Ensure that your Music files are of the correct format (usually .MP3 or .WMA suffix and usually NOT .WAV which is the standard CD format). - Ensure that you upload your music .MP3 or .WMA files to the correct directory and names are not excessively long as some MP3 will limit the max name length. If you know a working song on your MP3, locate the directory it resides in and put your songs there. - Lastly, if you have put your song with the correct naming convention/suffix and you now see them in your player list but they will not play, then your MP3/WMA file has non-compatible 'property' whcih is usually the encoding 'bit rate' (usually anything under 128mbps fix rate is good but you can see what is acceptable by looking at the 'properties' of your working songs that are on your MP3 player)

Dec 19, 2009 | Sears GC-820 MP3 Player

1 Answer

It wont play the downloading songs


The following may help:
- Ensure that your Music files are of the correct format (usually .MP3 or .WMA suffix and usually NOT .WAV which is the standard CD format). - Ensure that you upload your music .MP3 or .WMA files to the correct directory and names are not excessively long as some MP3 will limit the max name length. If you know a working song on your MP3, locate the directory it resides in and put your songs there. - Lastly, if you have put your song with the correct naming convention/suffix and you now see them in your player list but they will not play, then your MP3/WMA file has non-compatible 'property' whcih is usually the encoding 'bit rate' (usually anything under 128mbps fix rate is good but you can see what is acceptable by looking at the 'properties' of your working songs that are on your MP3 player)

Dec 19, 2009 | Element Electronics Zr-Element Digital...

1 Answer

I need some instructions on how play it


1. Use Windows Media Player to put songs on your Coby MP3 player. Download songs in MP3, WMA, or OGG format from a legal downloading website. If the file is not one of the previously mentioned files, you must download a converter to convert the file to one of the correct files that can be played on Windows Media Player. Rip a song from a CD by inserting the CD and then click on the option to "Rip" the song to your library. Some Coby MP3 players do not need Windows Media Player to add songs, so be sure to check your user manual to see if there is an even simpler method.
2. Connect your Coby MP3 player to your computer using the USB connector that came with your MP3 player. The player will show up under the "Devices" option on your Window Media Player application.
3. Click on the "Library" option to view all of the songs stored on your Windows Media Player library. You can drag the song to the MP3 player in the "Devices" section, or you can right-click on the song and choose the option to transfer the song. In the pop-up box choose your MP3 from the drop-down menu and then click on the "Transfer" button.
4. Right-click on the MP3 player in Windows Media Player and choose the "Eject" option. Disconnect your MP3 player from your computer and turn it on. The song will now be available on your MP3 player. Press the bottom button to play or pause the song.
5. Add videos and pictures to your Coby MP3 player if it supports those files. The process is similar to transferring audio files. Plug your MP3 player into your computer. Open the photo file on your computer and drag pictures into the player. You can create folders to organize the pictures.

Sep 30, 2009 | Coby MP-C552 MP3 Player

1 Answer

I can't get my MP3 to download and play WMA Format


Here is the asterisk behind WMA compatibility - there are two types of WMA files - protected and unprotected. 90% of WMA files are DRM-protected, hence they are either not usable in mp3 players that say they can play WMA's, or the song has a DRM restriction on it that prevents it from being played on an mp3 player without purchasing additional rights.

To avoid the problem completely, only download songs that are in mp3 format. It may be more expensive initially, but they are better in the long-term - even if you found a WMA file that eventually works with your mp3 player, the protected WMA files have an expiration date, so they would stop working after 30 days, 90 days, 1 year, or 2 years depending on the specific license for each song. Mp3 files never expire, never give you error messages, and work with nearly (if not all) 100% of mp3 players.

Good luck!

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Mar 30, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

MY SANSA WONT SYNC SONGS..


The songs are in the wrong format - they need to be stripped of their DRM license (illegal) or converted to mp3 format.  The best, most legal way to do this is to redownload the songs as an Mp3 file, or re-rip your CD's in Windows Media Player in Mp3 format.
these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 12, 2008 | SanDisk Sansa e260 MP3 Player

1 Answer

"format not supported" - error message of death


1. songs which have copyright protection on aren't recognised by the player
2.you can't convert from WMA to MP3
3. you can't drag and drop from a CD you have to rip it first. i suggest you use windows media player for this as it is very quick you just put in the disk and click 'RIP'
4. you can down;load the latest media converter from the philips website which will actually convert things
5. try upgrading the firmware (from the philips website) you need to download the new device manager and then follow insructions from the web page
6. try reparing your device using the new device manager (it will delete anything you have on there

Aug 08, 2008 | Philips GoGear Flash MP3 Player

1 Answer

HELP!!!


The songs that you are syncing may not be in the right format for this particular Mp3 player. Where did you get the songs?
Q: What type of files can I play?
A: Mp3 and WMA files. DRM protected WMA files, such as those purchased from many online music services, must be copied to the player via Windows Media Player or the music management software compatible with your online music store.

The player does not support AAC file playback.
(i.e: iTunes will not work)

May 23, 2008 | Siren Edge MP3 Player

1 Answer

I use urge to rip songs off a cd and then sync them onto an IPOD. The IPOD (G) drive is showing the files but they won't play what am I missing


Make sure the songs are in the correct format. Make sure the songs are not AAC, WAV, streaming, or some other non-supported format
Mp3 players are more complicated than ever. This player may only accept DRM-encrypted WMA files. I would first check the songs that you have downloaded to make sure they did not have "temporary" licenses with a fixed end date. You can do this by right clicking on an individual song, clicking on properties, and selecting the "license," "digital rights mgmt" or "media usage rights" tab - the wording varies by configuration. It will give you info on the license. If the song says that it has no license, it will not work with this player. One remedy is to use mp3 converter software to convert all of those wma files to Mp3's - I don't know of any free ones, but you can certainly look for free Mp3 Converters. Another remedy on unlicensed songs is to hit the "acquire license" link in the license tab, if one exists.
-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Jan 01, 2008 | RCA TH1101 MP3 Player

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