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I can not record any more recordings as disc does not any more space what do I do

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Simon Atkinson

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What recorder are you using? The simple answer here is to delete some of the older recordings that you don't use. Some recorders will let you use an external hard drive to record to or move some of your recordings to it to free up space.

Posted on Nov 28, 2022

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Disc memory issues

Record what? And what Disc do you mean? What is your operating system? And what program are you using to record with?
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I have dubbed vcr tape to a Sony DVD-RW disc and tried playing it back through a toshiba player and it keeps coming up Bad Disk. My PC won't even recognise it. When started dubbing the screen displayed 1hr...

Did you say you used a DVD-RW disc to transfer a videotape onto? The reason your PC won't recognise that disc is because the data format on it is a different language to what PCs understand - plus an unfinalised DVD-RW won't play in other DVD players - it is usually an incompatible format.

(DVD+RW discs with titles/top menus created in video mode CAN be played on a PC DVD drive or a normal DVD player as can finalised DVD-R discs (DVD-R discs MUST be recorded and finalised in the same recorder for compatible playback). DVD-RW discs can only be viewed on the unit they were written/recorded on.

The other reason for the 'remaining space' on the disc you describe showing less than 120 minutes is due to a title recently being recorded or erased - unless you format it - the 120 minute / 4.7GB DVD-RW will not show full available space. Erasing titles on re-writable DVDs does not increase space. The same rule applies to unfinalised +R / -R discs (you cannot re-format these to get the space back once recorded - they are 'once only' writables)

I recommend you invest in some DVD-R discs and re-copy your VHS tape to that - then if you are satisfied with the result, title etc., finalise the DVD-R - it will play on any DVD player or PC with DVD support (or it should). These discs are relatively inexpensive to buy just about anywhere.

Final note: do NOT finalise the DVD-RW you recorded (I hope you haven't already done this) - simply format/erase it - re-use it for something else or keep it until you need it.

You can use any brand of DVD, just take note of the format before recording/playing.
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Memorex DVD-RW (4X 4.7GB) disks keep closing record sessions and cuts off at about 1:39 minutes.

Hi. Sounds like you are maxing out your recording space on your disc.1:39 sounds like the capacity of a single layer DVD-RW. You can confirm this by putting the disc into a computer and checking the "properties" of the DVD. Go into "My computer" [ldouble click], highlight DVD drive [rightclick] then select "properties"[left click]. the pie chart will show you graphically space remainig on the disc
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I Have a Magnavox MWR10D6 DVD Recorder Certain shows or movies i try to record , I get a pop-up saying " Cannot record in +VR mode " . What is +vr mode and how do I change it?

VR mode or Video Recording mode is a feature on stand-alone consumer and computer DVD recorders that allows video recording and editing on a DVD rewritable disc.
In VR mode, users can create and rename titles for the scenes. Also, if a scene is deleted, the space allocated by it will be utilized later without the need of reformatting a disc.
If the user would like to record on the same disc again at a later time, in VR mode, users may eject the disc and it will not be finalized by the recorder until it is manually initiated. For the sake of comparison, any DVD disc recorded in VR's competitor V mode (or Video mode) will be automatically finalized before it is ejected by the recorder. Disc finalization is still required if the disc formatted for VR mode will be played in another DVD player.
Currently, users can only record in VR mode with the use of DVD-RW, DVD-RAM and DVD+RW discs, (updated in 2000 to accommodate DVD-R (General)) [DVD players marked “RW compatible” and “DVD Multi” can play DVD-VR recorded discs] and on some recorders, also on hard-disk drives.
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Finalize a Disc on Mangavox MWR10D6

No. Generally finalising just writes the unused spaces as unused so the player knows and adds a stop code. The shorter the DVD the longer the finalise. An hour and a half on two hours is plenty of space.
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I'm trying to copy old family videos from VCR to DVD. I'm using the correct disc type (DVD-R) and there's no copy protection. I've tried both Sony and HP discs. Each time, it seems to be working but...

First, try to refinalize the disc if it failed the first time by going into the edit menu. Sometimes finalization just fails the first time.

If you are recording on 2-hr mode, and the length of your recording is an 1hr 50 min or more, there will not be enough space left on the disc to finalize. Going forward, your best solution would be to record in 3- or 4-hour mode for every 2 hrs worth of recording (6-hour mode for 3-5 hours of recording, etc.). Just to quickly decipher recording modes: 2-hr mode (sometimes called SP Mode, depending on DVD player) will record about 2 hours worth of material on a standard blank DVD (but some extra space would be required for finalization); 4-hour mode would record 4 hours worth of material on a standard DVD; 6-hour mode would record 6 hours, etc.

As far as salvaging the recordings you have already made - load the burned, yet unfinalized DVD's into your computer. Copy the files onto the desktop or some easy-to-find location on your computer. Then use a program, free or otherwise (I personally reccomend Nero or Roxio), to re-burn the discs. The newer version of Nero automatically finalizes the disc, but some software requires you to select an option that allows you to "close disc" or "finalize" the disc. (In computer lingo, "closing" means the same thing as "finalizing").

Good luck!

-Tha Mp3 Doctor
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What is +vr and how do I remove it

VR mode or Video Recording mode is a feature on stand-alone consumer and computer DVD recorders that allows video recording and editing on a DVD rewriteable disc.
In VR mode, users can create and rename titles for the scenes. Also, if a scene is deleted, the space allocated by it will be utilized later without the need of reformatting a disc.
If the user would like to record on the same disc again in later time, on VR mode, users may eject the disc and it will not be finalized by the recorder until it is manually initiated. For the sake of comparison, any DVD disc recorded in VR's competitor V mode (or Video mode) will be automatically finalized before it is ejected by the recorder. Disc finalization is still required if the disc formatted for VR mode will be played in another DVD player.
Currently, users can only record in VR mode with the use of DVD-RW, DVD-RAM and DVD+RW discs, (updated in 2000 to accommodate DVD-R (General)) [DVD players marked “RW compatible” and “DVD Multi” can play DVD-VR recorded discs] and on some recorders, also on hard-disk drives.
Blu-ray Disc and HD DVD also support VR mode-like features.

Accordingly when DVD recorders became a viable option the features offered by <Video Mode> were minimal - the linear structure did not allow post recording editting or non-linear playback. Thus the DVD Forum devised Video Recording (VR) mode.

Unlike DVD-Video this uses a much simplier file structure that allows non-linear modification to the recorded data. This means features such as partial erase, editting, playlists, simulataneous record/playback, mixing of different media types (JPEG, MPEG1/2/4, MP3, WMA, WMV etc) and, in future models, dual record are all possible."

That basically summerises the differences: video is a linear recording that should end up DVD-Video compatible, VR is a digital recording mode that allows HDD-like functionality on disc.

Do you need to always be able play your recorded DVD-RW discs on other DVD Players? If yes you have to use Video Mode, although some players will play VR mode discs, and you can test this easily by giving it a go.

The main differences are:

DVD Video mode on DVD-RW

Plus points: Provides good compatibility (70% plus). That’s the only plus, plain and simple.

Negative Points: Only simple linear editing possible, really just hiding a title. You can reuse space only when you delete the last title or completely reformat but lose everything in the process. No defect management. Requires finalisation to play in other DVD Players. No possibility of time-slip, i.e. recording and playing back at the same time.

DVD VR mode (Video Recording)

Plus points: Better use of recording rates by having intermediate resolutions. Defect management so reliable. Time-slip on 2 speed media if supported by the recorder, allowing record and playback at the same time. Non-linear editing. Any space freed is reused automatically (think hard-drive or Mini-Disc) and added to the remaining time.

Negative Points: Not very compatible with existing DVD Players, plain and simple.

Of course if you have a hard-drive based recorder then all the negatives are wiped out, as you use VR mode on the hard-drive which gives you all the pluses of VR mode, then record to DVD-RW in Video Mode to give you the compatibility to play the disc elsewhere.
- A recording on DVD-RAM will always use VR mode
- A recording on DVD-R will always use Video mode
- A recording on DVD-RW can be either Video or VR depending which is set before the recording is made.
- A recording to DVD+RW or DVD+R will always use Video mode
- Many HDD/DVDR combi recorders will record to the HDD in VR mode and allow you to dub (digitally) to DVD-R in Video mode.

Here is your manual:
http://www.p4c.philips.com/files/d/dvdr3545v_37/dvdr3545v_37_dfu_aen.pdf
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I am recording fron VHS to DVD. When I am finished and push the stop button, How can I tell how much space is on the DVD to record something else and how do I finish the dik so it can't be recordered over

JVC DVD Recorder – Finalizing and disc space
First, you will need to know if the program was recorded in XP mode, SP mode, LP mode, or EP mode. To find out how much room there is left, put the dvd in the tray and press the Disc Menu/List button on the JVC remote. This will display the title and how long it is - write that number down. It will also say either "XP,SP, LP, or EP" - write down that mode. In XP mode, a DVD will hold 1 hr and 20 mins worth of prgramming - MAXIMUM. SP mode = 2 hours. LP mode = 4 hours. EP = 6 hours. So, if your program is one hour, and you recorded in LP mode, you have 4 - 1 = 3 hours of space left for recording on that disc.

If you finalize a disc, you will no longer be able to add more programs to that disc, unless the disc is a + or - RW disc. Also note that finalization requires some disc space, so if you recorded a program that is exactly 1hr and 20 mins long, and you recorded it in XP mode, then the disc will probably not finalize correctly.

That being said, the finalization directions are on p. 23 of your manaul: Title --> Finalize --> => --> find finalize --> Enter --> OK --> Enter

Now it will play on other players.

Here is a link to the user manual:
http://resources.jvc.com/Resources/00/00/93/LPT1133-001A.pdf

-Tha Mp3 Doctor
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My JVC DR-MV7 will play most DVDs and even record, but recently, it stopped being able to finalize. After I get the message saying "finalization has failed," I can't even play the DVD anymore - thus losing...

My JVC DR-MV7 will not accept any disc for playback. I insert a movie disc and it consistently rejects them. After about 15 to 20 attempts, sometimes it will stay and begin reading the disc. It also sounds like some internal components are encountering some resistance (moving parts inside?). Any ideas?
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DVD copying

There are double layer DVD's that they make which usually have about 2x the memory. check to see if your DVD recorder supports these types of DVD's. You could also just divide your media on to two sides of a double sided DVD (each side has the mirror look and you can record onto both sides)(still the same disc) or you could record on to multiple DVD's (may be inconvenient but is still an option). Also, you could reduce the recording quality just a bit so that it is not noticable when you watch it but it still uses less space on the disk. I would tell you how to do these things but I have no experience with the individual model that you have.
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