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Luxman C-02/M-02 MM and MC

Hi. I have a Luxman pair pre amp/amp C-02 M-02 connected to carbon black record deck running a Ortofon MM red cartridge. I was messing around with the settings and inadvertently turned the phono to MC high. Wow what a difference in sound quality,total night and day.Sound a lot clearer and pronounced.I let this run for about 30min and monitored the heat from both units,couldn't feel any difference. The question is though what if there would any damage to the units using the pre amp set to this? Thanks.

Posted by Alex Greig on

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JVC l-A31 turntable volume not very loud, is connected to a amp with phono inputs, wires are connected to the cartridge...

Hello Charles.

Maybe you use the wrong pickup system.
Normal Phono inputs are just for MM-Systems.
MC-System needs other Pre-Amp.
Some newer Amps have a switch (mostly near the Phono inp.) to select MM- or MC- system. (MM means Moving Magnet-Sys. and MC is Moving Coil-Sys)

Best Regrets Gue.
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I am getting a weak signal on the right channel of my Hitachi HT-40S turntable with original Ortofon LM 10 cartridge.

If you have disconnected the cartridge and touched the leads in that state and you had no sound out of the right channel, then there is nothing wrong with the cartridge at all. You either have a bad lead from the deck to the amp, or a bad connector to the amp. If replacing or fixing the lead does not correct the problem, then you have to look at the pre-amp in your amp as the cause. The amp will have a dedicated magnetic cartridge pre-amp. It's failure on the right channel will not effect any other function, such as tape or radio. You can easily find the cause, by tracing the phono connector wires back (inside the unit) to the first port of call on the PC board. You will either find a single IC doing most of the work of the pre-amp or two IC's, one for each channel. If you are lucky and a single channel IC does the work, replace the right hand one. Otherwise replace the dual channel one.

If you think it's the cartridge, then remember that putting the left channel connector on the right input of the cartridge should see no sound. But if you hear sound by switching the cartridge connections the cartridge is good.
I have noticed that you have tried another amp with the deck and it made no difference. This implies then a faulty lead between the deck and amps.
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Just got my pair of Stanton T60 decks out of the box for the first time in a while, and I'm not getting a signal out of either. I changed one of the cartridges with no luck. Whats likely to be wrong?

Have you checked what you have them connected to?

The best way is to connect your deck to the amp and remove the wires to the cartridge. Switch on the amp. With your finger, touch each of the cartridge wires one at a time. You should hear a loud buzz, one on either channel, from two of the wires. The other two wires may produce a slight buzz, but it doesn't matter if they do or don't. If you get no buzz from any of the wires then either the connections between the deck and amp are faulty or the pre-amp inside the amp has failed. This will not affect any other amp functions.

If you get a very weak buzz on the two channels, you have no magnetic cartridge pre-amp on your amp. In which case you need to connect the decks to a dedicated "phono" socket, which has one built in, or buy a Magnetic Cartridge Pre-amp.
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When playing LP the sound is bass heavy, but when playing a cd, the sound is perfect.... any suggestions?

The record deck is played through a separate pre-amp to all other functions, so it therefore could be a fault in that pre-amp, but I doubt it. You can fit a wide verity of cartridges in record decks that will each give a different response to the sound. But first check that the cartridge connections are correct. Try swapping them around, it might change what you get. But it could simply be that you have a cartridge that produces a lot of bass. Changing the cartridge to a high quality recommended type - by say some hi-fi buffs website or magazine, might solve the problem.
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My record players sound quality is really low and idk what the problem is. The vinyls aren't dusty and it used to be so much louder so can you please help?

Unless you are connecting to a different amplifier and the sound is low on that, the likely cause is the pre-amp of the amplifier. Since the record deck uses a separate pre-amp on your amp it won't affect the other functions. You can confirm that it's gone by removing the wires from the cartridge. With the amp on and deck still connected touch the wires with your finger. If there is only a small buzz from two of the wires, this will confirm the pre-amp is the problem. However if you hear a loud buzz from them, the cartridge is faulty.
If you have knowledge of electronics you can trace the pre-amp inside the amp. It's probably a small IC that has gone, which if you can get the replacement part should cure the problem.
If you are connecting the deck to another amp, then that amp might not have a Magnetic Cartridge Pre-amp built in, but you can buy these separately.
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My thorens td-190-2 recently lost its normal output volume. I have tried three cartridges with no change. What could it be?

I assume your turntable was connected to the record deck input on your amp when you lost volume from it. Then you tried other connections marked tape or CD?
As you have tried different cartridges with no response we can assume the piece of equipment that has failed is not your record deck. Instead it is your amp. The problem you are experiencing is that the pre-amp inside your amp has failed. This pre-amp is connected only to the record deck input of the amp. The other connections don't have this pre-amp which is called a magnetic cartridge pre-amp. So connecting to them will just give you the signal only from the deck, which as you say you can hear, thus proving the cartridge is working, but will be low in volume.

If you are any good at electronic repair it will be easy to fix this pre-amp. You can find it by following the internal connections from the record deck socket back to a circuit board. The chances are this will lead to an IC that does the work. Get the IC number and search the web for it, before removing it.
Alternative you can take it to a service centre for repair if you have no experience of electronic repair.
Another option is to search the web for a magnetic cartridge pre-amp. These are sold separately as many Audio amps don't have them fitted, seeing not many people have record decks. This can be connected between the deck and one of those other inputs (don't use the record deck one). The cost of one of these might work out cheaper than repair at a service centre. The repair by yourself will of course be cheaper, unless the IC is hard to find or specialised. But a search of the web for the IC number will show how cheap it is anyway. However if the IC is expensive that will also make repair by a service centre expensive too. So you can save the expense of the repair by going for a new pre-amp.
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If the cartridge is good and your wiring is good. Then it's either got to be a fault on your amp, or there is a pre-amp in the deck itself faulty. Double check that the amp is working, amps have a pre-amp for record decks, they cause trouble a lot.
If you touch the wires that connect to the cartridge, you should get a buzz on either channel (remove them from the cartridge first). If you don't get a decent buzz, and you know that the amp is working fine, then there's something inside the deck causing the problem. In which case take the bottom off and take a look inside.
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I use an MC cartridge with an amp that doesn't have a phono input at all; therefore I needed to buy a special external phono pre-amp. I bought a Musical Fidelity X-LPS. But cheaper pre-amps do exist.
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