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My electric water heater will not drain, the valve is closed shut with sediment,. How can I fix it it?

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Vernon Taylor

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  • Water Master
  • 6,702 Answers

Without knowing anything about your water heater, I would suggest taking it out into the yard and after removing the valve and as many fittings as possible, try to poke an opening in the sediment with wire or whatever and then reverse flush it using an air/water gun or pressure washer and then flush it through every opening.
Once satisfied as much sediment as possible has been removed, ensure the electrics are thoroughly dry before reinstalling.

Posted on May 17, 2020

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5 Related Answers

Mike Wenger

  • 14 Answers

SOURCE: Water heater is bubbling with the sound of sediment

You can try to flush the sediment with the water and power on. Just hook a short hose to the drain and shoot it into a clean white bucket (so you can see what comes out). The drains on most water heaters are far too constricted to flush anything but the small particles, so if your problem continues you might consider replacing the factory drain with a short 3/4" dielectric pipe nipple, a 3/4" full port ball valve, a 3/4" m.i.p. x 3/4" garden hose male and a garden hose cap with hose washer. That will give you some serious flushing capability.

If all of these steps won't get rid of your noises take comfort in the fact that the noise may be a nuisance to you, but it is not doing any really bad damage to your heater. I also strongly recommend getting a water softener to prevent this problem from ever happening again.

Mike

Posted on Apr 05, 2009

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Bruce Hathcock

  • 3600 Answers

SOURCE: Drain Valve on bottom of water heater drips when Water IN turned

If the hot water heater is gas be sure it's turned off same if it's electric so you don't burn out theelements in the tank, I would advise you to buy some plumbers putty and pull the drain scre out and put putty in it then reinstall the screw. all the ones I looked at I could not tell by looking to see where the drain was and if it has like a hose bib on it or not. also pull the screw all theway out and see if you got some sand in the valve and if so use some compressed air in a can to blow the stuff out of the seating area of the screw. Hope this is helpful would be nice to have a picture of the drain.

Posted on Jul 26, 2009

Anonymous

  • 760 Answers

SOURCE: i have a 50 gallon

If you're having to reset the breaker, then most likely you have a bad heating element. Usually the bottom element burns out first, however if you had the water off, and the level dropped in the tank, the heater might have come on without water in it. This will cause it to overheat and burn out. Now when you turn the breaker on, the current is going to ground, tripping the breaker. If you are handy you can replace them, but be sure water heater electric is off or disconnected, and then drain water below the element level. While you're replacing one element replace them both.

Posted on Oct 13, 2010

heatman101

D. Floyd Kolb

  • 43501 Answers

SOURCE: My Rheem: Model # 41V50,

Hi,

The drain valve can always be replaced so you can drain that with no worries....after it is empty open and clsoe the cold water valve to flush more...

As far as being large enough... that depends...

If you have a teenager like I do that takes 40 min showers in steaming hot water... no....
If you are running more then one shower at a time... then probably not...

The other thing that could have happened is that the dip tube for the cold water inlet has broken off or disintergrated...that happens...
Usually you will then get cold water and the gas valve will not yet have kicked on the burner, because the cold water is not going to the bottom...

If it is a new install... check thet the supply and return are hooked up correctly...

thermostat is gas vavle may also be bad, but not too likely...

heatman101

Posted on Feb 25, 2011

Testimonial: "Thank you for your information. I will try to drain the tank first."

Anonymous

SOURCE: Where is water shut off valve on Rheem Electric

The shut-off is not on the water heater.
The shut-off is usually located on cold water pipe that enters water heater.
See image of shut-off:
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/Low-water-pressure-2-800.jpg

If shut-off is not located on cold pipe at water heater, then turn off water to house at water meter.

More resources:
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-troubleshoot-electric-problems-with-water-heater.html

Posted on Sep 25, 2011

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1 Answer

Crown boiler


follow this chart troubleshooting and fix it. God bless you
est and replace a high-limit cutoff:
  1. Disconnect power to the heater at the electrical panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Remove the upper access panel and push the reset button.
  3. Replace the access panel and turn the power back on. If the water is hot, the reset was the problem. If not, you'll need to turn the power off again and reopen the access panel.
  4. Use a multimeter to test the cutoff terminals for continuity. If faulty, replace with an exact replacement part.
Drain a tank:
  1. Shut off power at the electrical panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Close the cold-water supply valve and open a hot-water faucet somewhere in the house (to speed draining).
  3. Attach a garden hose to the drain valve and run it outside the house.
  4. Open the drain valve and allow all water to drain out.
  5. To refill the tank, close the drain valve tightly and open the cold-water supply valve. Also open a nearby hot-water faucet. When a steady stream of water flows from that faucet, the tank is full and the faucet can be closed.
  6. Once the tank is full, turn the electrical power back on.
Test and replace a relief valve:
  1. Lift the spring lever on the valve to fill a small cup. Check the cup for sediment.
  2. If no water spurts out, or if water continues to drip after the valve is released, replace the valve.
  3. Cut power at the electrical panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on. Close the cold-water supply valve.
  4. Drain a few gallons of water from the tank.
  5. Unscrew and remove the discharge pipe if used.
  6. Loosen the relief valve with a pipe wrench, then remove the valve by hand.
  7. Apply pipe tape to the threads of the replacement valve and screw it into the tank by hand. Tighten it with a pipe wrench. Screw the discharge pipe (if any) into the valve outlet.
  8. Refill the water heater and restore electrical power.
Replace a drain valve:
  1. Shut off power at the electrical panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Close the cold-water supply valve and drain the water heater completely (see above).
  3. Unscrew the drain valve with a pipe wrench.
  4. Replace the drain valve with an identical unit wrapping the end with pipe tape.
  5. Refill the tank and restore electricity.

Oct 14, 2013 | Water Heaters

1 Answer

Low flow trough the heater


follow this steps and fix it. God bless you
Drain a tank:
  1. Shut off power at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Close the cold-water supply valve and open a hot-water faucet somewhere in the house (to speed draining).
  3. Attach a garden hose to the drain valve and run it outside the house.
  4. Open the drain valve and allow all water to drain out.
  5. To refill the tank, close the drain valve tightly and open the cold-water supply valve. Also open a nearby hot-water faucet. When a steady stream of water flows from that faucet, the tank is full and the faucet can be closed.
  6. Once the tank is full, turn the electrical power back on.
Test and replace a relief valve:
  1. Lift the spring lever on the valve to fill a small cup. Check the cup for sediment.
  2. If no water spurts out, or if water continues to drip after the valve is released, replace the valve.
  3. Cut power at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on. Close the cold-water supply valve.
  4. Drain a few gallons of water from the tank.
  5. Unscrew and remove the discharge pipe if used.
  6. Loosen the relief valve with a pipe wrench, then remove the valve by hand.
  7. Apply pipe tape to the threads of the replacement valve and screw it into the tank by hand. Tighten it with a pipe wrench. Screw the discharge pipe (if any) into the valve outlet.
  8. Refill the water heater and restore electrical power.

Oct 08, 2013 | Water Heaters

1 Answer

Btu meter honeywell


follow this steps and fix it. God bless you

An electric water heater is a 240-volt appliance that can deliver a fatal shock. Always turn off power to the heater at the electrical panel before beginning work, and verify that power has been shut off. Make sure others in the house know not to restore electricity prematurely. If you have any doubt as to whether electricity has been turned off, seek professional assistance.
Troubleshoot a thermostat:
  1. Shut off power to the heater at the electrical panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Unscrew and remove the electric water heater access panel.
  3. Using a small screwdriver, turn the thermostat dial counterclockwise to lower the temperature, or clockwise to raise it. If the water heater doesn't maintain the proper temperature, test the thermostat.
  4. Disconnect one wire to the upper thermostat to test it. Set a multimeter to RX1 (resistance times 1) and touch a probe to the thermostat terminals as indicated in the owner's manual. Depending on the model and the terminals tested, the tester should show infinity ( open) or about 0 ( closed).
  5. Test the lower thermostat in the same manner.
  6. If necessary, replace the thermostat. Unscrew it from its mounting and install one of the same model, size, and rating. Once you install it, adjust the thermostat following instructions in your owner's manual.
Test and replace a heating element:
  1. Turn off power at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Remove the access panel on the electric water heater.
  3. Disconnect one of the element wires and set a multimeter to RX1000 (resistance times 1,000). Touch one probe to an element mounting bolt and the other to each element terminal screw, in turn. If the tester displays anything but infinity ( open circuit), replace the element.
  4. If necessary, set the multimeter to RX1 and touch the probes to the terminal screws. If there is any resistance reading at all ( closed circuit), then the element is good. If not, replace it. Both upper and lower elements are tested in the same manner.
  5. To remove the element, first drain the heater.
  6. Disconnect the remaining element wire. Remove the mounting bolts holding the element in place. Remove the element.
  7. Replace the heating element with one of the same model, shape, and rating. Make sure you also replace any installation gaskets.
Test and replace a high-limit cutoff:
  1. Disconnect power to the heater at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Remove the upper access panel and push the reset button.
  3. Replace the access panel and turn the power back on. If the water is hot, the reset was the problem. If not, you'll need to turn the power off again and reopen the access panel.
  4. Use a multimeter to test the cutoff terminals for continuity. If faulty, replace with an exact replacement part.
Drain a tank:
  1. Shut off power at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Close the cold-water supply valve and open a hot-water faucet somewhere in the house (to speed draining).
  3. Attach a garden hose to the drain valve and run it outside the house.
  4. Open the drain valve and allow all water to drain out.
  5. To refill the tank, close the drain valve tightly and open the cold-water supply valve. Also open a nearby hot-water faucet. When a steady stream of water flows from that faucet, the tank is full and the faucet can be closed.
  6. Once the tank is full, turn the electrical power back on.
Test and replace a relief valve:
  1. Lift the spring lever on the valve to fill a small cup. Check the cup for sediment.
  2. If no water spurts out, or if water continues to drip after the valve is released, replace the valve.
  3. Cut power at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on. Close the cold-water supply valve.
  4. Drain a few gallons of water from the tank.
  5. Unscrew and remove the discharge pipe if used.
  6. Loosen the relief valve with a pipe wrench, then remove the valve by hand.
  7. Apply pipe tape to the threads of the replacement valve and screw it into the tank by hand. Tighten it with a pipe wrench. Screw the discharge pipe (if any) into the valve outlet.
  8. Refill the water heater and restore electrical power.
Replace a drain valve:
  1. Shut off power at the electric panel d823f6bc-fc7a-4a21-93d9-5ea6957e7890.jpgand post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Close the cold-water supply valve and drain the water heater completely (see above).
  3. Unscrew the drain valve with a pipe wrench.
  4. Replace the drain valve with an identical unit wrapping the end with pipe tape.
  5. Refill the tank and restore electricity.

Oct 02, 2013 | Water Heaters

1 Answer

Junkers manual gas hot water


please make this test and fix it. God bless you

An electric water heater is a 240-volt appliance that can deliver a fatal shock. Always turn off power to the heater at the electric panel before beginning work, and verify that power has been shut off. Make sure others in the house know not to restore electricity prematurely. If you have any doubt as to whether electricity has been turned off, seek professional assistance.
Troubleshoot a thermostat:
  1. Shut off power to the heater at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Unscrew and remove the electric water heater access panel.
  3. Using a small screwdriver, turn the thermostat dial counterclockwise to lower the temperature, or clockwise to raise it. If the water heater doesn't maintain the proper temperature, test the thermostat.
  4. Disconnect one wire to the upper thermostat to test it. Set a Multimeter to RX1 (resistance times 1) and touch a probe to the thermostat terminals as indicated in the owner's manual. Depending on the model and the terminals tested, the tester should show infinity ( open) or about 0 ( closed).
  5. Test the lower thermostat in the same manner.
  6. If necessary, replace the thermostat. Unscrew it from its mounting and install one of the same model, size, and rating. Once you install it, adjust the thermostat following instructions in your owner's manual.
Test and replace a heating element:
  1. Turn off power at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Remove the access panel on the electric water heater.
  3. Disconnect one of the element wires and set a multimeter to RX1000 (resistance times 1,000). Touch one probe to an element mounting bolt and the other to each element terminal screw, in turn. If the tester displays anything but infinity ( open circuit), replace the element.
  4. If necessary, set the multimeter to RX1 and touch the probes to the terminal screws. If there is any resistance reading at all ( closed circuit), then the element is good. If not, replace it. Both upper and lower elements are tested in the same manner.
  5. To remove the element, first drain the heater.
  6. Disconnect the remaining element wire. Remove the mounting bolts holding the element in place. Remove the element.
  7. Replace the heating element with one of the same model, shape, and rating. Make sure you also replace any installation gaskets.
Test and replace a high-limit cutoff:
  1. Disconnect power to the heater at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Remove the upper access panel and push the reset button.
  3. Replace the access panel and turn the power back on. If the water is hot, the reset was the problem. If not, you'll need to turn the power off again and reopen the access panel.
  4. Use a multimeter to test the cutoff terminals for continuity. If faulty, replace with an exact replacement part.
Drain a tank:
  1. Shut off power at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Close the cold-water supply valve and open a hot-water faucet somewhere in the house (to speed draining).
  3. Attach a garden hose to the drain valve and run it outside the house.
  4. Open the drain valve and allow all water to drain out.
  5. To refill the tank, close the drain valve tightly and open the cold-water supply valve. Also open a nearby hot-water faucet. When a steady stream of water flows from that faucet, the tank is full and the faucet can be closed.
  6. Once the tank is full, turn the electrical power back on.
Test and replace a relief valve:
  1. Lift the spring lever on the valve to fill a small cup. Check the cup for sediment.
  2. If no water spurts out, or if water continues to drip after the valve is released, replace the valve.
  3. Cut power at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on. Close the cold-water supply valve.
  4. Drain a few gallons of water from the tank.
  5. Unscrew and remove the discharge pipe if used.
  6. Loosen the relief valve with a pipe wrench, then remove the valve by hand.
  7. Apply pipe tape to the threads of the replacement valve and screw it into the tank by hand. Tighten it with a pipe wrench. Screw the discharge pipe (if any) into the valve outlet.
  8. Refill the water heater and restore electrical power.
Replace a drain valve:
  1. Shut off power at the electric panel and post a sign warning others not to turn it on.
  2. Close the cold-water supply valve and drain the water heater completely (see above).
  3. Unscrew the drain valve with a pipe wrench.
  4. Replace the drain valve with an identical unit wrapping the end with pipe tape.
  5. Refill the tank and restore electricity.

Oct 01, 2013 | Water Heaters

2 Answers

Rust in water heater tank


the tank needs flushed out ! heres how. Water heater manufacturers recommend flushing sediment from your storage type water heater periodically.
If your water heater is gas, set the gas valve to "Pilot" to prevent the burners from coming on while you are flushing it. If your heater is electric be sure to turn off the circuit breakers. With an electric water heater, if the water level drops below the heating elements and the thermostat turns the elements on, the heating elements will probably burn out quite rapidly. Connect a garden hose to the drain valve at the bottom of the tank, Close the shut off valve on the cold inlet to the water heater. open the temperature/pressure relief valve at the top of the tank by lifting the lever. Leave the valve open. Open the drain valve at the bottom of the heater allowing the water to flow out through the garden hose. when the water is clear your finished. close pressure relief valve on top of tank and turn water back on.
Open a hot water faucet in your house, and let it run until no air bubbles come out.

Turn the heater back on, and with gas units re-light the pilot light if necessary. good-day !

Apr 24, 2012 | Water Heaters

1 Answer

I have a Richmond model 8MV50-2B. I'm having issues draining the tank to check the electrodes. Normally, on a water heater there is a shutoff down near where you attach the garden hose to drain the...


Problem is not clear.
Is water heater clogged and not draining?
What kind of shut off is normally located down near drain valve on electric water heater?
If you have gas heater, you can normally just rotate knob to pilot to shut off burner.
If you are draining electric water heater, normally you turn off circuit breaker, attach garden hose to drain valve, open drain valve by turning counterclockwise, open TP valve or open bathtub faucet, and then water drains out.

Open following links for illustrations.
http://waterheatertimer.org/Water-heater-will-not-drain.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-replace-water-heater-drain-valve.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/Clean-sediment-out-of-water-heater.html

Aug 13, 2011 | Water Heaters

1 Answer

Noise in the water heater valve. How do I fix it?


Valve is not identified.
Cold water shut-off valve, TP valve, check valve, mixing valve, drain valve are the usual suspects associated with electric water heater.
Gas water heater has additional valves: gas shut off valve and gas control valve thermostat.
Check valve, TP valve and mixing valve probably need replacement.
If drain valve is leaking, put garden hose cap over end.
Shut off valve probably has a bit of blockage, or is not completely open. Try closing and then opening shut-off valve all the way, and if problem persists, replace or clean out valve.

What kind of noise? Are you sure the noise is from a valve or is it inside the tank caused by sediment build-up inside of tank?

http://waterheatertimer.org/Clean-sediment-out-of-water-heater.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/Low-hot-water-pressure.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-replace-TP-valve.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/images/Water-heater-with-mixing-valve-300.jpg

Jul 04, 2011 | RTO Bradford White M-1-20U6SS 19 Gallon...

1 Answer

Popping noise in water heater. What is it and how do I fix it?


What is probably happening is that you have a build up of minerals on inner tank lining and when unit is heat it expands the tank and the deoosits at a different rate which is what is causing the popping noise.
I would turn power off to your heater and hook a garden hose on to drain valve.Route hose to safe area as the water being drained will be hot. Open drain valve and see if you can get it draining good.If it is then shut off water supply to heater and open hot side of faucet nearby to prevent vacumn from slowing down draining. I would drain as much as I could then close drain valve and faucet and refill tank. I would do this several times to try to get all sediment flushed out.Hopefully this will help with your noise and make your heater last longer and work more effceiently. Good luck and thank you.

Feb 13, 2011 | RELIANCE ELECTRIC WATER HEATER

1 Answer

Do we need to shut off the gas or pilot light when draining out sediment on our gas water heater?


Yes you should shut off gas valve & water in to tank. Drain tank fully then turn on water & relight pilot.

Jan 24, 2011 | RELIANCE ELECTRIC WATER HEATER

1 Answer

I have a hotpoint hot water heater it's about 6 years old. When I turn the hot water on it runs very slowly the water pressure is very low and it's like this throughout the house how do I fix this problem...


You have clog in the water line.
Since all hot water pipes are involved, clog is probably near water heater.

Buy pressure gauge at hardware store that threads onto hose connection.
Brady BTG 100 at Amazon
Picture of gauge

Check outdoor pressure for baseline pressure in your home.
Turn off electricity to hot water heater for an hour or two so there is not scalding water.
Open drain valve on water heater to see if water heater is clogged with sediment.
http://waterheatertimer.org/Water-heater-will-not-drain.html

Put pressure gauge on drain valve and compare with outside pressure.
Open hot water spigot on bathtub and see if tank pressure drops ... if tank pressure drops significantly with bathtub spigot on, then clog is on incoming cold water before tank, and could be on outgoing hot water pipes too.
If tank pressure stays about the same, then clog is on outgoing hot water pipes.

Clog can be sediment caught in cold water shut off valve located above tank. Open and close valve and test pressure again. Take apart incoming cold water pipes above tank and check for sediment. Replace valve. Look at condition of cold water nipple on top of tank.

Sediment caught at hot water elbow near tank.
Sediment can fill up old pipes. Take apart hot water pipes above water heater and see condition.
Look at condition of hot water nipple on top of tank.
You may have to take apart pipes up to first or second elbow.

Pipes can decay at joint where copper pipe connects to galvanized pipe. Check for copper to galvanized connections on cold or hot pipes and replace section of galvanized pipe. Copper pipe will probably be good, the galvanized pipe will deteriorate. Replace copper-to-galvanized joint with 3/4" non-conducting union from hardware store

Dec 06, 2010 | Water Heaters

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