Question about Kenmore Ovens

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Do kenmore gas ovens have fuses? I was changing the igniter and one of the wires touched one of the terminals causing a spark.

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5 Suggested Answers

Anonymous

  • 136 Answers

SOURCE: Kenmore 24" Built In Gas Oven Model # 30469791

Stupid question, but does the burner ever ignite?

Posted on Sep 15, 2007

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Anonymous

  • 130 Answers

SOURCE: Kemore Gas oven - trouble igniting

Depending on the age of the oven, it is possible that your ignitor is now weak and it is taking longer to ignite.

Posted on Feb 03, 2008

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Anonymous

  • 31 Answers

SOURCE: Gas Maytag oven won't ignite

my oven would take almost 25 minutes to get to 125 degrees. i replaced the igniter for around 48 dollars about a year ago and have had no more problems. hope this helps. if you are any kind of handyman at all it is a do it yourself job.

Posted on Feb 21, 2009

MNfisherman

Nate Stansfield

  • 11896 Answers

SOURCE: Kenmore oven doesn't light, replaced igniter and may have created a 2nd problem

If you follow the igniter wire harness, you will see a little relay in there that will probably need to be replaced.

Posted on May 30, 2009

Anonymous

  • 20 Answers

SOURCE: my kenmore oven igniter doesnt click and there is

Oven ignitors are not the "clicking" variety - they use a hot surface ignitor and "feed through" to a current sensing gas valve - in short, if the ignitor is going bad, then the gas valve won't open (safety). Try replacing the HSI in the bottom of your oven - do an online search and match up model and serial of your unit to the part. Be careful no to touch or break the new ignitor - VERY FRAGILE!!!

Posted on Sep 01, 2009

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Hii,My Kenmore gas oven is not heating consistently. What elements should I check out first?


Nothing Works, or the Oven / Range / Stovetop Works Only At Certain Times:

1.Home breaker flipped or the fuse blown?Possibly an electrical surge has flipped the breaker. Check your breaker or fuse box and replace or reset as necessary.
2.Power cord plugged in?Grab the plug and wiggle to determine a good connection.
3.Power cord damage?Damaged rubber with wires showing through or the wire is being pinched can cause issues. Electrical tape is acceptable for covering damaged wires.
4.Aclicking sound could be something wrong with a relay. Check for any loose connections around the main control board on your oven. The click you hear is a relay losing power and switching back on. If the clock resets then something is causing power interruptions to the board.

If your oven has internal fuses, a wiring or component problem could have caused a fuse to blow. A blown fuse is an indication that a component has shorted or failed, and the problem will need to be corrected. Most ovens that use fuses will have an indication of the circuits that are affected by a particular fuse. If an oven fuse has blown, then you should inspect the oven element and the associated wiring to determine the cause before replacing the fuse.

THINGS TO CHECK:

the broil element
is the heating element that is found at the top of the oven and produces a very high heat for broiling. If the broil element isn't working, you should first do a visual inspection for signs that the element has blistered or separated. If the element appears normal then you can check for continuity with a multi-meter. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test. Remove the back panel and locate the terminals for the broil element and inspect the terminals and wires for signs of overheating or damage.

If there is no continuity then the element will need to be replaced. If the wires are damaged then they will need to be repaired. If the element is ok then you will need to check the broil circuit to determine the cause. This involves live voltage checks and should only be performed by qualified persons. Components to check include fuses, if the range is equipped, and oven control thermostat or electronic control.


The bake element
is the heating element that is found at the bottom of the oven. Most electric ovens use both the bake element and the broil element in a bake cycle, with the bake element performing 90% of the heating. If the bake element isn't working, the oven may not heat. To help determine if the bake element is defective you should first do a visual check. If the element is blistered or separated then it should be replaced. If the element appears to look normal, then turn the oven on to a bake function for a minute and then turn it off.

Check the element for signs of heating and if it is still cold then it may be defective. Disconnect the power and then remove the back panel. First check the wires as they may have become loose or corroded. If the element appears to be fine visually, test it for continuity with a multi-meter. If the element is burned or no longer has continuity, it will need to be replaced.

Surface burners
are typically either a coil type, solid type or a ribbon coil as used in smooth top ranges. All of these consist of a heating wire that uses electric current to produce heat. Coil type elements can be checked for continuity by removing them from the terminal block and testing them with a multi-meter.

You should also inspect the terminal ends for signs of heat damage or corrosion, and if present, you should replace the terminal block or receptacle at the same time. You will need to remove power from the range to change the terminal block. Solid elements and smooth top elements require raising or removing the main top to gain access. You will need to remove power from the range before lifting the main top. Continuity can then be checked with a multi-meter, once you have removed the wires from the element terminals.

On modern electronic control ranges, the oven temperature sensor
is the part that regulates the oven temperature. If it is not working properly it could be the reason why the range or oven won't start. This part can be found inside the oven on the rear wall near the top. Most modern ovens will display a fault code if the oven sensor is at fault. If you think the sensor may be the issue you can check the resistance with a multi-meter but will need to know the correct resistance of the sensor at room temperature. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test.

The infinite switch
on the control panel controls the power to each surface element. If you have no heat at an element and the element and terminal block check ok, then you may have a defective infinite switch. Disconnect power to the range and remove the console back panel. Locate the switch and check for overheated wires or faulty terminals first. Test the switch's contacts for continuity with a multi-meter. If defective, replace the switch.
If the infinite switch does not appear to be defective, then you should check for proper voltage to the switch. This is a live high voltage test and should only be performed by qualified persons.

Most modern ovens use an electronic control board
to control the oven functions. These models will use the control board to operate the oven safety valve on a gas range or oven, and the bake and broil elements on an electric range or oven. If there is no power to the igniter circuit, or the element circuits, then you should check the control board to verify that there is power at the appropriate output relay. These are live voltage checks and should be performed by qualified persons only. If there is no output voltage then the control should be replaced.

The oven safety valve
(also called the gas valve) is the part that ensures that gas is not released until the igniter has reached the correct temperature needed to ignite the gas. While this part can fail, it is uncommon. If the hot surface igniter does not glow you should first verify that you have voltage to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If voltage is lost at the valve terminals then you should verify the continuity of the bi-metal in the valve using a multi-meter.

The oven burner igniter
commonly known as the hot surface igniter is used in modern gas oven burners to open the gas valve and to ignite the gas. As the igniter draws electric current it will heat to a high temperature and glow, as well as cause the bi-metal in the oven safety valve to warp and open the valve releasing the gas to be ignited. This sequence normally takes about a minute. Igniters come in both flat and round styles and are very fragile. If the burner does not light then you should check the igniter first. If the igniter does not glow at all, then check for power to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If power is present then the igniter may be open circuit and can be checked for continuity with a multi-meter. If the igniter is glowing, but the burner is not lighting, the igniter may be weak and still be at fault because it requires a certain amount of current draw to open the valve. This check requires the use of an amp meter and should be performed by a qualified person. If the igniter is defective then it must be replaced.

Apr 08, 2015 | Kenmore Ovens

1 Answer

Our Kenmore Elite Gas stove has 1 pilot that won't light when the knob is turned. How do we fix this.


The oven safety valve
(also called the gas valve) is the part that ensures that gas is not released until the igniter has reached the correct temperature needed to ignite the gas. While this part can fail, it is uncommon. If the hot surface igniter does not glow you should first verify that you have voltage to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If voltage is lost at the valve terminals then you should verify the continuity of the bi-metal in the valve using a multi-meter.

The oven burner igniter
commonly known as the hot surface igniter is used in modern gas oven burners to open the gas valve and to ignite the gas. As the igniter draws electric current it will heat to a high temperature and glow, as well as cause the bi-metal in the oven safety valve to warp and open the valve releasing the gas to be ignited. This sequence normally takes about a minute. Igniters come in both flat and round styles and are very fragile. If the burner does not light then you should check the igniter first. If the igniter does not glow at all, then check for power to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If power is present then the igniter may be open circuit and can be checked for continuity with a multi-meter. If the igniter is glowing, but the burner is not lighting, the igniter may be weak and still be at fault because it requires a certain amount of current draw to open the valve. This check requires the use of an amp meter and should be performed by a qualified person. If the igniter is defective then it must be replaced.

GAS OVENS 1)The spark igniter tip is dirty (can clean it with either a little wire brush or a piece of fine sandpaper).

2) The Pilot flame is too low, and the tip of the igniter is not in the flame good enough. (the flame acts as a circuit when it touches the tip & completes the circuit).

3) The spark module is no good and needs to be replaced.(But 1 & 2 are your best bet).
spark module does not sense the flame when it's on. The spark igniter is also the flame sensor which provides feedback to the spark module.

Make sure the igniter is properly aligned with the burner lighting holes and it is clean. All lighting holes must be clean too. You can enlarge them using a drill bit one size bigger.

If it would not fix the problem, replace the bake burner and the igniter.

There is a small chance for the spark module itself to be bad as well.

Apr 12, 2014 | Kenmore Elite Stainless Steel 40" Dual...

1 Answer

Kenmore oven model 790 doesn't heat up


Nothing Works, or the Oven / Range / Stovetop Works Only At Certain Times:

1.Home breaker flipped or the fuse blown?Possibly an electrical surge has flipped the breaker. Check your breaker or fuse box and replace or reset as necessary.
2.Power cord plugged in?Grab the plug and wiggle to determine a good connection.
3.Power cord damage?Damaged rubber with wires showing through or the wire is being pinched can cause issues. Electrical tape is acceptable for covering damaged wires.
4.Aclicking sound could be something wrong with a relay. Check for any loose connections around the main control board on your oven. The click you hear is a relay losing power and switching back on. If the clock resets then something is causing power interruptions to the board.

If your oven has internal fuses, a wiring or component problem could have caused a fuse to blow. A blown fuse is an indication that a component has shorted or failed, and the problem will need to be corrected. Most ovens that use fuses will have an indication of the circuits that are affected by a particular fuse. If an oven fuse has blown, then you should inspect the oven element and the associated wiring to determine the cause before replacing the fuse.

THINGS TO CHECK:

the broil element
is the heating element that is found at the top of the oven and produces a very high heat for broiling. If the broil element isn't working, you should first do a visual inspection for signs that the element has blistered or separated. If the element appears normal then you can check for continuity with a multi-meter. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test. Remove the back panel and locate the terminals for the broil element and inspect the terminals and wires for signs of overheating or damage.

If there is no continuity then the element will need to be replaced. If the wires are damaged then they will need to be repaired. If the element is ok then you will need to check the broil circuit to determine the cause. This involves live voltage checks and should only be performed by qualified persons. Components to check include fuses, if the range is equipped, and oven control thermostat or electronic control.


The bake element
is the heating element that is found at the bottom of the oven. Most electric ovens use both the bake element and the broil element in a bake cycle, with the bake element performing 90% of the heating. If the bake element isn't working, the oven may not heat. To help determine if the bake element is defective you should first do a visual check. If the element is blistered or separated then it should be replaced. If the element appears to look normal, then turn the oven on to a bake function for a minute and then turn it off.

Check the element for signs of heating and if it is still cold then it may be defective. Disconnect the power and then remove the back panel. First check the wires as they may have become loose or corroded. If the element appears to be fine visually, test it for continuity with a multi-meter. If the element is burned or no longer has continuity, it will need to be replaced.

Surface burners
are typically either a coil type, solid type or a ribbon coil as used in smooth top ranges. All of these consist of a heating wire that uses electric current to produce heat. Coil type elements can be checked for continuity by removing them from the terminal block and testing them with a multi-meter.

You should also inspect the terminal ends for signs of heat damage or corrosion, and if present, you should replace the terminal block or receptacle at the same time. You will need to remove power from the range to change the terminal block. Solid elements and smooth top elements require raising or removing the main top to gain access. You will need to remove power from the range before lifting the main top. Continuity can then be checked with a multi-meter, once you have removed the wires from the element terminals.

On modern electronic control ranges, the oven temperature sensor
is the part that regulates the oven temperature. If it is not working properly it could be the reason why the range or oven won't start. This part can be found inside the oven on the rear wall near the top. Most modern ovens will display a fault code if the oven sensor is at fault. If you think the sensor may be the issue you can check the resistance with a multi-meter but will need to know the correct resistance of the sensor at room temperature. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test.

The infinite switch
on the control panel controls the power to each surface element. If you have no heat at an element and the element and terminal block check ok, then you may have a defective infinite switch. Disconnect power to the range and remove the console back panel. Locate the switch and check for overheated wires or faulty terminals first. Test the switch's contacts for continuity with a multi-meter. If defective, replace the switch.
If the infinite switch does not appear to be defective, then you should check for proper voltage to the switch. This is a live high voltage test and should only be performed by qualified persons.

Most modern ovens use an electronic control board
to control the oven functions. These models will use the control board to operate the oven safety valve on a gas range or oven, and the bake and broil elements on an electric range or oven. If there is no power to the igniter circuit, or the element circuits, then you should check the control board to verify that there is power at the appropriate output relay. These are live voltage checks and should be performed by qualified persons only. If there is no output voltage then the control should be replaced.

The oven safety valve
(also called the gas valve) is the part that ensures that gas is not released until the igniter has reached the correct temperature needed to ignite the gas. While this part can fail, it is uncommon. If the hot surface igniter does not glow you should first verify that you have voltage to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If voltage is lost at the valve terminals then you should verify the continuity of the bi-metal in the valve using a multi-meter.

The oven burner igniter
commonly known as the hot surface igniter is used in modern gas oven burners to open the gas valve and to ignite the gas. As the igniter draws electric current it will heat to a high temperature and glow, as well as cause the bi-metal in the oven safety valve to warp and open the valve releasing the gas to be ignited. This sequence normally takes about a minute. Igniters come in both flat and round styles and are very fragile. If the burner does not light then you should check the igniter first. If the igniter does not glow at all, then check for power to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If power is present then the igniter may be open circuit and can be checked for continuity with a multi-meter. If the igniter is glowing, but the burner is not lighting, the igniter may be weak and still be at fault because it requires a certain amount of current draw to open the valve. This check requires the use of an amp meter and should be performed by a qualified person. If the igniter is defective then it must be replaced.

Apr 11, 2014 | Kenmore Ovens

1 Answer

Kenmore Model# VF60563352 does not start . The burners do not work


Nothing Works, or the Oven / Range / Stovetop Works Only At Certain Times:

1.Home breaker flipped or the fuse blown?Possibly an electrical surge has flipped the breaker. Check your breaker or fuse box and replace or reset as necessary.
2.Power cord plugged in?Grab the plug and wiggle to determine a good connection.
3.Power cord damage?Damaged rubber with wires showing through or the wire is being pinched can cause issues. Electrical tape is acceptable for covering damaged wires.
4.Aclicking sound could be something wrong with a relay. Check for any loose connections around the main control board on your oven. The click you hear is a relay losing power and switching back on. If the clock resets then something is causing power interruptions to the board.

If your oven has internal fuses, a wiring or component problem could have caused a fuse to blow. A blown fuse is an indication that a component has shorted or failed, and the problem will need to be corrected. Most ovens that use fuses will have an indication of the circuits that are affected by a particular fuse. If an oven fuse has blown, then you should inspect the oven element and the associated wiring to determine the cause before replacing the fuse.

THINGS TO CHECK:

the broil element
is the heating element that is found at the top of the oven and produces a very high heat for broiling. If the broil element isn't working, you should first do a visual inspection for signs that the element has blistered or separated. If the element appears normal then you can check for continuity with a multi-meter. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test. Remove the back panel and locate the terminals for the broil element and inspect the terminals and wires for signs of overheating or damage.

If there is no continuity then the element will need to be replaced. If the wires are damaged then they will need to be repaired. If the element is ok then you will need to check the broil circuit to determine the cause. This involves live voltage checks and should only be performed by qualified persons. Components to check include fuses, if the range is equipped, and oven control thermostat or electronic control.


The bake element
is the heating element that is found at the bottom of the oven. Most electric ovens use both the bake element and the broil element in a bake cycle, with the bake element performing 90% of the heating. If the bake element isn't working, the oven may not heat. To help determine if the bake element is defective you should first do a visual check. If the element is blistered or separated then it should be replaced. If the element appears to look normal, then turn the oven on to a bake function for a minute and then turn it off.

Check the element for signs of heating and if it is still cold then it may be defective. Disconnect the power and then remove the back panel. First check the wires as they may have become loose or corroded. If the element appears to be fine visually, test it for continuity with a multi-meter. If the element is burned or no longer has continuity, it will need to be replaced.

Surface burners
are typically either a coil type, solid type or a ribbon coil as used in smooth top ranges. All of these consist of a heating wire that uses electric current to produce heat. Coil type elements can be checked for continuity by removing them from the terminal block and testing them with a multi-meter.

You should also inspect the terminal ends for signs of heat damage or corrosion, and if present, you should replace the terminal block or receptacle at the same time. You will need to remove power from the range to change the terminal block. Solid elements and smooth top elements require raising or removing the main top to gain access. You will need to remove power from the range before lifting the main top. Continuity can then be checked with a multi-meter, once you have removed the wires from the element terminals.

On modern electronic control ranges, the oven temperature sensor
is the part that regulates the oven temperature. If it is not working properly it could be the reason why the range or oven won't start. This part can be found inside the oven on the rear wall near the top. Most modern ovens will display a fault code if the oven sensor is at fault. If you think the sensor may be the issue you can check the resistance with a multi-meter but will need to know the correct resistance of the sensor at room temperature. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test.

The infinite switch
on the control panel controls the power to each surface element. If you have no heat at an element and the element and terminal block check ok, then you may have a defective infinite switch. Disconnect power to the range and remove the console back panel. Locate the switch and check for overheated wires or faulty terminals first. Test the switch's contacts for continuity with a multi-meter. If defective, replace the switch.
If the infinite switch does not appear to be defective, then you should check for proper voltage to the switch. This is a live high voltage test and should only be performed by qualified persons.

Most modern ovens use an electronic control board
to control the oven functions. These models will use the control board to operate the oven safety valve on a gas range or oven, and the bake and broil elements on an electric range or oven. If there is no power to the igniter circuit, or the element circuits, then you should check the control board to verify that there is power at the appropriate output relay. These are live voltage checks and should be performed by qualified persons only. If there is no output voltage then the control should be replaced.

The oven safety valve
(also called the gas valve) is the part that ensures that gas is not released until the igniter has reached the correct temperature needed to ignite the gas. While this part can fail, it is uncommon. If the hot surface igniter does not glow you should first verify that you have voltage to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If voltage is lost at the valve terminals then you should verify the continuity of the bi-metal in the valve using a multi-meter.

The oven burner igniter
commonly known as the hot surface igniter is used in modern gas oven burners to open the gas valve and to ignite the gas. As the igniter draws electric current it will heat to a high temperature and glow, as well as cause the bi-metal in the oven safety valve to warp and open the valve releasing the gas to be ignited. This sequence normally takes about a minute. Igniters come in both flat and round styles and are very fragile. If the burner does not light then you should check the igniter first. If the igniter does not glow at all, then check for power to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If power is present then the igniter may be open circuit and can be checked for continuity with a multi-meter. If the igniter is glowing, but the burner is not lighting, the igniter may be weak and still be at fault because it requires a certain amount of current draw to open the valve. This check requires the use of an amp meter and should be performed by a qualified person. If the igniter is defective then it must be replaced.

Apr 04, 2014 | Kenmore Ovens

1 Answer

Kenmore 90104 oven wont heat


If your oven has internal fuses, a wiring or component problem could have caused a fuse to blow. A blown fuse is an indication that a component has shorted or failed, and the problem will need to be corrected. Most ovens that use fuses will have an indication of the circuits that are affected by a particular fuse. If an oven fuse has blown, then you should inspect the oven element and the associated wiring to determine the cause before replacing the fuse.

THINGS TO CHECK:

the broil element
is the heating element that is found at the top of the oven and produces a very high heat for broiling. If the broil element isn't working, you should first do a visual inspection for signs that the element has blistered or separated. If the element appears normal then you can check for continuity with a multi-meter. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test. Remove the back panel and locate the terminals for the broil element and inspect the terminals and wires for signs of overheating or damage.

If there is no continuity then the element will need to be replaced. If the wires are damaged then they will need to be repaired. If the element is ok then you will need to check the broil circuit to determine the cause. This involves live voltage checks and should only be performed by qualified persons. Components to check include fuses, if the range is equipped, and oven control thermostat or electronic control.


The bake element
is the heating element that is found at the bottom of the oven. Most electric ovens use both the bake element and the broil element in a bake cycle, with the bake element performing 90% of the heating. If the bake element isn't working, the oven may not heat. To help determine if the bake element is defective you should first do a visual check. If the element is blistered or separated then it should be replaced. If the element appears to look normal, then turn the oven on to a bake function for a minute and then turn it off.

Check the element for signs of heating and if it is still cold then it may be defective. Disconnect the power and then remove the back panel. First check the wires as they may have become loose or corroded. If the element appears to be fine visually, test it for continuity with a multi-meter. If the element is burned or no longer has continuity, it will need to be replaced.

Surface burners
are typically either a coil type, solid type or a ribbon coil as used in smooth top ranges. All of these consist of a heating wire that uses electric current to produce heat. Coil type elements can be checked for continuity by removing them from the terminal block and testing them with a multi-meter.

You should also inspect the terminal ends for signs of heat damage or corrosion, and if present, you should replace the terminal block or receptacle at the same time. You will need to remove power from the range to change the terminal block. Solid elements and smooth top elements require raising or removing the main top to gain access. You will need to remove power from the range before lifting the main top. Continuity can then be checked with a multi-meter, once you have removed the wires from the element terminals.

On modern electronic control ranges, the oven temperature sensor
is the part that regulates the oven temperature. If it is not working properly it could be the reason why the range or oven won't start. This part can be found inside the oven on the rear wall near the top. Most modern ovens will display a fault code if the oven sensor is at fault. If you think the sensor may be the issue you can check the resistance with a multi-meter but will need to know the correct resistance of the sensor at room temperature. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test.

The infinite switch
on the control panel controls the power to each surface element. If you have no heat at an element and the element and terminal block check ok, then you may have a defective infinite switch. Disconnect power to the range and remove the console back panel. Locate the switch and check for overheated wires or faulty terminals first. Test the switch's contacts for continuity with a multi-meter. If defective, replace the switch.
If the infinite switch does not appear to be defective, then you should check for proper voltage to the switch. This is a live high voltage test and should only be performed by qualified persons.

Most modern ovens use an electronic control board
to control the oven functions. These models will use the control board to operate the oven safety valve on a gas range or oven, and the bake and broil elements on an electric range or oven. If there is no power to the igniter circuit, or the element circuits, then you should check the control board to verify that there is power at the appropriate output relay. These are live voltage checks and should be performed by qualified persons only. If there is no output voltage then the control should be replaced.

The oven safety valve
(also called the gas valve) is the part that ensures that gas is not released until the igniter has reached the correct temperature needed to ignite the gas. While this part can fail, it is uncommon. If the hot surface igniter does not glow you should first verify that you have voltage to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If voltage is lost at the valve terminals then you should verify the continuity of the bi-metal in the valve using a multi-meter.

The oven burner igniter
commonly known as the hot surface igniter is used in modern gas oven burners to open the gas valve and to ignite the gas. As the igniter draws electric current it will heat to a high temperature and glow, as well as cause the bi-metal in the oven safety valve to warp and open the valve releasing the gas to be ignited. This sequence normally takes about a minute. Igniters come in both flat and round styles and are very fragile. If the burner does not light then you should check the igniter first. If the igniter does not glow at all, then check for power to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If power is present then the igniter may be open circuit and can be checked for continuity with a multi-meter. If the igniter is glowing, but the burner is not lighting, the igniter may be weak and still be at fault because it requires a certain amount of current draw to open the valve. This check requires the use of an amp meter and should be performed by a qualified person. If the igniter is defective then it must be replaced.

Feb 09, 2014 | Kenmore Ovens

1 Answer

Kenmore oven will not heat


1.Home breaker flipped or the fuse blown?Possibly an electrical surge has flipped the breaker. Check your breaker or fuse box and replace or reset as necessary.
2.Power cord plugged in?Grab the plug and wiggle to determine a good connection.
3.Power cord damage?Damaged rubber with wires showing through or the wire is being pinched can cause issues. Electrical tape is acceptable for covering damaged wires.
4.Aclicking sound could be something wrong with a relay. Check for any loose connections around the main control board on your oven. The click you hear is a relay losing power and switching back on. If the clock resets then something is causing power interruptions to the board.

If your oven has internal fuses, a wiring or component problem could have caused a fuse to blow. A blown fuse is an indication that a component has shorted or failed, and the problem will need to be corrected. Most ovens that use fuses will have an indication of the circuits that are affected by a particular fuse. If an oven fuse has blown, then you should inspect the oven element and the associated wiring to determine the cause before replacing the fuse.

THINGS TO CHECK:

the broil element
is the heating element that is found at the top of the oven and produces a very high heat for broiling. If the broil element isn't working, you should first do a visual inspection for signs that the element has blistered or separated. If the element appears normal then you can check for continuity with a multi-meter. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test. Remove the back panel and locate the terminals for the broil element and inspect the terminals and wires for signs of overheating or damage.

If there is no continuity then the element will need to be replaced. If the wires are damaged then they will need to be repaired. If the element is ok then you will need to check the broil circuit to determine the cause. This involves live voltage checks and should only be performed by qualified persons. Components to check include fuses, if the range is equipped, and oven control thermostat or electronic control.


The bake element
is the heating element that is found at the bottom of the oven. Most electric ovens use both the bake element and the broil element in a bake cycle, with the bake element performing 90% of the heating. If the bake element isn't working, the oven may not heat. To help determine if the bake element is defective you should first do a visual check. If the element is blistered or separated then it should be replaced. If the element appears to look normal, then turn the oven on to a bake function for a minute and then turn it off.

Check the element for signs of heating and if it is still cold then it may be defective. Disconnect the power and then remove the back panel. First check the wires as they may have become loose or corroded. If the element appears to be fine visually, test it for continuity with a multi-meter. If the element is burned or no longer has continuity, it will need to be replaced.

Surface burners
are typically either a coil type, solid type or a ribbon coil as used in smooth top ranges. All of these consist of a heating wire that uses electric current to produce heat. Coil type elements can be checked for continuity by removing them from the terminal block and testing them with a multi-meter.

You should also inspect the terminal ends for signs of heat damage or corrosion, and if present, you should replace the terminal block or receptacle at the same time. You will need to remove power from the range to change the terminal block. Solid elements and smooth top elements require raising or removing the main top to gain access. You will need to remove power from the range before lifting the main top. Continuity can then be checked with a multi-meter, once you have removed the wires from the element terminals.

On modern electronic control ranges, the oven temperature sensor
is the part that regulates the oven temperature. If it is not working properly it could be the reason why the range or oven won't start. This part can be found inside the oven on the rear wall near the top. Most modern ovens will display a fault code if the oven sensor is at fault. If you think the sensor may be the issue you can check the resistance with a multi-meter but will need to know the correct resistance of the sensor at room temperature. Remove power from the appliance before performing this test.

The infinite switch
on the control panel controls the power to each surface element. If you have no heat at an element and the element and terminal block check ok, then you may have a defective infinite switch. Disconnect power to the range and remove the console back panel. Locate the switch and check for overheated wires or faulty terminals first. Test the switch's contacts for continuity with a multi-meter. If defective, replace the switch.
If the infinite switch does not appear to be defective, then you should check for proper voltage to the switch. This is a live high voltage test and should only be performed by qualified persons.

Most modern ovens use an electronic control board
to control the oven functions. These models will use the control board to operate the oven safety valve on a gas range or oven, and the bake and broil elements on an electric range or oven. If there is no power to the igniter circuit, or the element circuits, then you should check the control board to verify that there is power at the appropriate output relay. These are live voltage checks and should be performed by qualified persons only. If there is no output voltage then the control should be replaced.

The oven safety valve
(also called the gas valve) is the part that ensures that gas is not released until the igniter has reached the correct temperature needed to ignite the gas. While this part can fail, it is uncommon. If the hot surface igniter does not glow you should first verify that you have voltage to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If voltage is lost at the valve terminals then you should verify the continuity of the bi-metal in the valve using a multi-meter.

The oven burner igniter
commonly known as the hot surface igniter is used in modern gas oven burners to open the gas valve and to ignite the gas. As the igniter draws electric current it will heat to a high temperature and glow, as well as cause the bi-metal in the oven safety valve to warp and open the valve releasing the gas to be ignited. This sequence normally takes about a minute. Igniters come in both flat and round styles and are very fragile. If the burner does not light then you should check the igniter first. If the igniter does not glow at all, then check for power to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If power is present then the igniter may be open circuit and can be checked for continuity with a multi-meter. If the igniter is glowing, but the burner is not lighting, the igniter may be weak and still be at fault because it requires a certain amount of current draw to open the valve. This check requires the use of an amp meter and should be performed by a qualified person. If the igniter is defective then it must be replaced.

Feb 09, 2014 | Kenmore Ovens

1 Answer

Fan of oven is working. Even the grill is working but there is no heat coming from the oven .Is it the element , thermostat . where are these located .has any had this problem .


IF THE GRIL IS WORKING YET U SAY NO HEAT? THEN HOW IS IT WORKING? OR DO U MEAN NO HEAT IN OVEN? IF SO
ELECTRIC OVENS:

CHECK THE OVEN RELAY CONTROL BOARD A clicking sound could be something wrong with a relay. Check for any loose connections around the main control board on your oven. The click you hear is a relay losing power and switching back on. If the clock resets then something is causing power interruptions to the board.
GAS OVENS
The spark igniter tip is dirty (can clean it with either a little wire brush or a piece of fine sandpaper).
2) The Pilot flame is too low, and the tip of the igniter is not in the flame good enough. (the flame acts as a circuit when it touches the tip & completes the circuit).
3) The spark module is no good and needs to be replaced.(But 1 & 2 are your best bet).
spark module does not sense the flame when it's on. The spark igniter is also the flame sensor which provides feedback to the spark module.

Make sure the igniter is properly aligned with the burner lighting holes and it is clean. All lighting holes must be clean too. You can enlarge them using a drill bit one size bigger.

If it would not fix the problem, replace the bake burner and the igniter.
There is a small chance for the spark module itself to be bad as well.

The oven safety valve
(also called the gas valve) is the part that ensures that gas is not released until the igniter has reached the correct temperature needed to ignite the gas. While this part can fail, it is uncommon. If the hot surface igniter does not glow you should first verify that you have voltage to the circuit. This is a live voltage check and should be performed by a qualified person. If voltage is lost at the valve terminals then you should verify the continuity of the bi-metal in the valve using a multi-meter.

Nothing Works, or the Oven / Range / Stovetop Works Only At Certain Times: I offer free advice bcuz God is so good!

1.Home breaker flipped or the fuse blown?Possibly an electrical surge has flipped the breaker. Check your breaker or fuse box and replace or reset as necessary.
2.Power cord plugged in?Grab the plug and wiggle to determine a good connection.
3.Power cord damage?Damaged rubber with wires showing through or the wire is being pinched can cause issues. Electrical tape is acceptable for covering damaged wires.
4.Aclicking sound could be something wrong with a relay. Check for any loose connections around the main control board on your oven. The click you hear is a relay losing power and switching back on. If the clock resets then something is causing power interruptions to the board.
5.
6.Even a bad relay door switch will hinder your oven from operating.

If your oven has internal fuses, a wiring or component problem could have caused a fuse to blow. A blown fuse is an indication that a component has shorted or failed, and the problem will need to be corrected. Most ovens that use fuses will have an indication of the circuits that are affected by a particular fuse. If an oven fuse has blown, then you should inspect the oven element and the associated wiring to determine the cause before replacing the fuse.


: I offer free advice bcuz God is so good!

Jan 03, 2011 | Belling XOU251 Electric Single Oven

1 Answer

I have a kenmore gas range with electric ignitors. My question is that my stove top doesnt ignite but lets gas by and I can use a lighter to lite them. However my oven doesn't do anything...no gas no...


Electric gas igniters sometimes get stuck in one position causing a clicking sound. The clicking sound that you hear is the electric arc that is pulsing from the igniter conductor (wire) to ground (the gas burner). It receives power from the electrical outlet that the stove is plugged into.
Residue from food and sometimes cleaning products may be preventing the igniter from producing a spark (Arc) to the base of the burner. This is a common problem that occurs when the stove has been cleaned or food is allowed to build up. Make sure that the igniter and the burner base are clean and dry. This will help with proper operation. Oven cleaner and a small tooth brush may be used to accomplish this. Another problem with ignition may occur if you have too little (touching) or too much space between the igniter and the base of the burner; it will prevent the burner from igniting. You should only have a little more space than the thickness of a nickel between the burner base and the igniter. A good “blue” arc from the igniter to the burner base is optimal. If this doesn’t work, you may need to replace the electric igniter module. Good luck.

Nov 06, 2009 | Kenmore 40494 / 40495 / 40499 Electric...

1 Answer

Kenmore gas oven model no. 273 3248296 pilot free ignition wont fire up


Hi

If it won’t fire then it is possible that the oven control is not sending gas for the pilot light. The pilot light works but no main burner ignition - possible pilot assembly is dirty and the pilot flame is too small, safety valve and thermocouple is faulty, the bulb from the safety valve is out of position and the pilot flame is not touching the thermocouple bulb. Some ranges use a standing pilot light ( small flame is on all the time ) while others use an spark ignition to light the pilot light flame and the pilot light flame heats up the thermocouple bulb to allow the main gas to flow through the oven burner.
The flame needs to heat the bulb up enough to tell it to open the gas valve. Several things can go wrong here that keep this from happening:
The pilot flame may not be hot enough, usually because the flame is yellow instead of pure blue or is too small. The cause for this is usually a dirty pilot assembly. The pilot assembly would either need to be cleaned or replaced.
The thermocouple bulb may not be positioned properly in the flame. You can't heat the bulb properly if it's not in the pilot flame! The thermocouple bulb needs to be in the upper third of a pure blue pilot flame--that's the hottest part of the flame.
The thermocouple itself may be burned out. It happens. It's an internal part of the gas valve so, no, you can't just change the thermocouple bulb separate from the gas valve.
But when you turn on the oven or the thermostat calls for heat, the pilot flame gets bigger and jumps down so it can heat up the thermocouple bulb. This extra gas to increase the pilot flame size comes from the thermostat.
If the pilot flame jumps upwards or just gets bigger, but doesn't shoot down, then you need to replace the pilot assembly.
If the pilot flame size does not increase or jump down when turning on the oven thermostat, then the problem is the thermostat not sending enough gas to the pilot assembly. It's also possible that the pilot gas supply tube has a hole in it somewhere.
One final point on the spark-assisted pilot ignition systems. The spark comes from the spark module--the same module that sends spark to your surface burners to light them up. If you're not getting a spark when you turn the oven on, then there are several possibilities:
There could be a problem with the switch in the thermostat. You can confirm this by doing a simple continuity test of the thermostat contacts. If you don't read zero ohms when you turn the switch on, replace the thermostat.
The spark module could be bad. You'll need to measure the voltage at the oven terminals of the spark module when you turn on the oven. If you get 120v but no spark, it's probably a bad spark module. Replace it.
Could be a bad spark wire or broken electrode.

Please do rate the solution and revert for further assistance.


Thanks
Rylee

Sep 10, 2009 | Kenmore Ovens

1 Answer

Kenmore electric stove, sparks when one of the four top burners lit-on


the wires for the element must be touching the cabinet causing a short. Pull the oven out and remove the back panel and move the terminals so they arent touching anything

May 23, 2008 | Kenmore 40494 / 40495 / 40499 Electric...

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