Question about Kenmore 62622 Microwave Oven

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Model 62252/62253/62259 My microwave is buzzing loud and no heat.  I conducted test on several components.  I found that the magnetron from filament to chassis, I'm getting 64.4 ohms, where it should be infinite, is that a sure way to know if my magnetron is bad.  I getting good power per spec off my transformers primary and secondary.  Meter reading on filament is less than 1 ohm should be good.

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  • Anonymous Dec 19, 2007

    Thanks you confirm what I thought. Good work.

  • mad dawg Dec 29, 2007

    My Kenmore over the range microwave recently started making a loud buzzing sound.  When that happens, it doesn't heat up the food, and appears to smoke and smell funny.  The microwave is about a year and a half old.  Any suggestions?

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If you removed wires to test mag tube and it's not infinite from either terminal to ground, it's shorted. Mag tubes will buzz like that. Also check high-voltage diode. Should have infinite in 1 direction. If in doubt, replace also.

Posted on Nov 22, 2007

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Maytag MMV4205AAB Making a loud noise once turned on, and not heating food


Hello,

Investigate these three areas if your microwave won't heat food and you hear a loud buzzing or humming noise.

Power Diode

A diode is an electronic component that readily passes current in one direction only and blocks the flow of current in the opposing direction. If your microwave's diode has become defective, your microwave will not heat and you will hear a buzzing noise. Test the diode to determine if this is the cause of your problem. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a diode

NOTE: Before you test your diode, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you discharge the microwave's capacitor.

Whether it is shorted or open, a defective diode will most likely show some sign of defect. Defective diodes will usually emit an electrical burning smell, signifying its defectiveness. Also, it may have split in two, or it may exhibit a burned crack, or possibly even a blistered spot.

A shorted diode is indicated by a loud humming noise from the high voltage transformer, and no heat produced when a cook cycle is initiated. Whereas little or no heat produced in your microwave, with an absence of a humming noise is indicative of an open diode. In either case, the diode has to be replaced.

With your microwave unplugged, and your capacitor discharged, use extreme caution to remove the lead that leads to the capacitor. You can leave the ground connection attached. The side of the diode that goes to the ground is usually marked with a dot, stripe, or arrow. Set your ohmmeter to R x 10,000 or higher. Touch the positive meter probe to the anode and the negative meter probe to the cathode to measure the resistance across the diode terminals. Remember that the cathode is on the side that goes to the ground, which is often marked by a dot, stripe, or an arrow.

A normal diode, that is a non-defective diode, will read anywhere from 50,000 to 200,000 ohms. Differences in microwave make and model account for this large range in resistance readings.

Reverse the meter probes and measure resistance while touching the positive probe to the cathode and the negative probe to the anode. Reversing the probes like this should result in a reading of infinity. Unless a bleeder resistor is present. The presence of a bleeder resistor would produce a reading of the value of the resistor.

High Voltage Capacitor

A capacitor is an electrical device which stores electricity. A defective capacitor may be why your microwave is not heating but you are hearing a buzzing or humming noise. The capacitor will have to be tested to determine if this is the cause of your problem. A defective capacitor will have to be replaced before your microwave will work again. Make sure you discharge the capacitor before you test it, though.

Magnetron

A defective magnetron is the third possible cause of why your microwave is not heating, but you can hear a buzzing noise. Test your microwave's magnetron. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a magnetron

NOTE: Before you test this component, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you have discharged the capacitor.

There are two tests to conduct in order to determine whether or not a magnetron has become defective. If you receive results other than what are detailed below, you will have to replace your microwave's magnetron. Each test is described for you here:

TEST 1: Locate your magnetron and label each of the wires attached to it so that you know which wires are to be replaced where. Set your ohmmeter to the lowest resistance scale. Take a resistance measurement between each of the magnetron's terminals by touching each probe to one terminal each. Reverse the probes and take a second resistance measurement. Each measurement should read less than one ohm.

TEST 2: Set your ohmmeter to its highest resistance scale. Touch one of the meter's probes to a magnetron terminal. Touch the other probe to the metal magnetron housing. Take special caution to not touch the two probes together. This could result in an inaccurate reading. This test should produce a reading of infinity - indicating an open circuit.

Read the tips on the below links on how to replace your microwave oven's diode and how to discharge the capacitor.

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088355-replace_microwave_ovens_diode

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor

I hope the above is helpful.

Regards.
Walesarumi

Sep 27, 2011 | Maytag MMV4205 Microwave Oven

Tip

What to do if your microwave oven does not heat and you hear a loud buzzing or...


Hello,<br /><br />Investigate these three areas if your microwave won't heat and you hear a loud buzzing or humming noise:<br /><br />Power Diode<br /><br />A diode is an electronic component that readily passes current in one direction only and blocks the flow of current in the opposing direction. If your microwave's diode has become defective, your microwave will not heat and you will hear a buzzing noise. Test the diode to determine if this is the cause of your problem. Replace it if it is defective.<br /><br />Testing a diode<br /><br />NOTE: Before you test your diode, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you discharge the microwave's capacitor.<br /><br />Whether it is shorted or open, a defective diode will most likely show some sign of defect. Defective diodes will usually emit an electrical burning smell, signifying its defectiveness. Also, it may have split in two, or it may exhibit a burned crack, or possibly even a blistered spot.<br /><br />A shorted diode is indicated by a loud humming noise from the high voltage transformer, and no heat produced when a cook cycle is initiated. Whereas little or no heat produced in your microwave, with an absence of a humming noise is indicative of an open diode. In either case, the diode has to be replaced.<br /><br />With your microwave unplugged, and your capacitor discharged, use extreme caution to remove the lead that leads to the capacitor. You can leave the ground connection attached. The side of the diode that goes to the ground is usually marked with a dot, stripe, or arrow. Set your ohmmeter to R x 10,000 or higher. Touch the positive meter probe to the anode and the negative meter probe to the cathode to measure the resistance across the diode terminals. Remember that the cathode is on the side that goes to the ground, which is often marked by a dot, stripe, or an arrow.<br /><br />A normal diode, that is a non-defective diode, will read anywhere from 50,000 to 200,000 ohms. Differences in microwave make and model account for this large range in resistance readings.<br /><br />Reverse the meter probes and measure resistance while touching the positive probe to the cathode and the negative probe to the anode. Reversing the probes like this should result in a reading of infinity. Unless a bleeder resistor is present. The presence of a bleeder resistor would produce a reading of the value of the resistor.<br /><br />High Voltage Capacitor<br /><br />A capacitor is an electrical device which stores electricity. A defective capacitor may be why your microwave is not heating but you are hearing a buzzing or humming noise. The capacitor will have to be tested to determine if this is the cause of your problem. A defective capacitor will have to be replaced before your microwave will work again. Make sure you discharge the capacitor before you test it, though.<br /><br />Magnetron<br /><br />A defective magnetron is the third possible cause of why your microwave is not heating, but you can hear a buzzing noise. Test your microwave's magnetron. Replace it if it is defective.<br /><br />Testing a magnetron<br /><br />NOTE: Before you test this component, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you have discharged the capacitor.<br /><br />There are two tests to conduct in order to determine whether or not a magnetron has become defective. If you receive results other than what are detailed below, you will have to replace your microwave's magnetron. Each test is described for you here:<br /><br />TEST 1: Locate your magnetron and label each of the wires attached to it so that you know which wires are to be replaced where. Set your ohmmeter to the lowest resistance scale. Take a resistance measurement between each of the magnetron's terminals by touching each probe to one terminal each. Reverse the probes and take a second resistance measurement. Each measurement should read less than one ohm.<br /><br />TEST 2: Set your ohmmeter to its highest resistance scale. Touch one of the meter's probes to a magnetron terminal. Touch the other probe to the metal magnetron housing. Take special caution to not touch the two probes together. This could result in an inaccurate reading. This test should produce a reading of infinity - indicating an open circuit.<br /><br />Read the tips on the below links on how to replace your microwave oven's diode and how to discharge the capacitor.<br /><br />http://<a href="http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor">www.fixya.com/support/r7088355-replace_microwave_ovens_diode</a><br /><br />http://<a href="http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor">www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor</a><br /><br />I hope the above is helpful.<br />

on Dec 02, 2010 | Microwave Ovens

1 Answer

My microwave will not heat model #mw8119sb


Hello there and welcome to fixya
Testing the magnetron WARNING: First, with power disconnected, discharge the high voltage capacitor. See the section Safe discharging of the high voltage capacitor.
  • A magnetron with an open filament will result in no heat but no other symptoms. The bad connection may be internal (in which case the magnetron will need to be replaced) or external at the filament terminals (which may be repairable).
  • A magnetron with with a short between the filament/cathode and anode will likely result in a loud hum from the HV transformer and/or magnetron when the cook cycle is initiated but the main fuse will probably not blow. However, note that the actual wattage drawn from the power line will probably be much lower than under normal conditions. Although there will be a high current flowing in the HV transformer secondary through the HV capacitor (likely causing a loud hum or buzz), the real power consumed will be reduced since the current and voltage will be out of phase (due to the series capacitor) and the power factor will be low. A reading on an AC line wattmeter of 300 W compared to the normal 1,200 to 1,500 W would be reasonable.
  • A magnetron with other faults may result in a variety of symptoms including erratic or low output power or intermittent operation. See the section: Comprehensive list of magnetron failure modes.
There is no totally definitive way to determine if a magnetron is good without actually powering it under operating conditions but the following tests will catch most problems:

  • Magnetron filament. The resistance should be infinite from the filament connections to the case and a fraction of an ohm between the filament terminals with the wiring disconnected from the magnetron. While measuring resistance from filament chassis, gently tap the magnetron to determine if there is an intermittent short. However, such problems may only show up once the filament heats up and parts expand.
    It may be possible to determine if the magnetron filament is actually working by connecting just the filament connections to a low voltage high current supply on a Variac (e.g., a microwave oven transformer but just the filament connections). Most ceramic insulators are translucent and should show a glow with a working filament. The one at the antenna may be visible if the magnetron is removed from the oven or with a dental mirror looking into the waveguide. WARNING: Make sure you ONLY have the filament connected!
    I tried powering the filaments of a few magnetrons. On those that had white or pink ceramic insulators between the antenna cap and body of the magnetron, the glow was very bright. Even on one with a dark red insulator, the glow could be seen with the lights out.

  • Evidence of arcing (visible blackening around ventilation holes in base or burnt odor) usually indicates a bad magnetron.
  • Melting or other damage to the antenna cover ('bull-nose' or 'bullet') may be the result of arcing due to problems in the oven cavity or waveguide (perhaps operating with nothing in the oven) or a defective magnetron. (This part is only visible with the magnetron removed from the oven). If a problem elsewhere has been corrected, the damaged antenna cover can be pulled off and replaced from a magnetron that died of other causes - try your local appliance repair shop. (The shape doesn't matter as long as it fits tightly - there are several diameters, however.) Your magnetron may still be good.
    Note: Since the antenna is attached directly to one of the vanes which is part of the anode assembly, it will test as a dead short to the case on your multimeter using DC and is normal. At 2.45 GHz, this won't be the case! :)

Aug 17, 2011 | Emerson Microwave Ovens

1 Answer

GE Spacemaker microwave works but does not heat. Model # JVM1440WD003.


Hello,

Investigate these three areas if your microwave won't heat and you hear a loud buzzing or humming noise:

Power Diode

A diode is an electronic component that readily passes current in one direction only and blocks the flow of current in the opposing direction. If your microwave's diode has become defective, your microwave will not heat and you will hear a buzzing noise. Test the diode to determine if this is the cause of your problem. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a diode

NOTE: Before you test your diode, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you discharge the microwave's capacitor.

Whether it is shorted or open, a defective diode will most likely show some sign of defect. Defective diodes will usually emit an electrical burning smell, signifying its defectiveness. Also, it may have split in two, or it may exhibit a burned crack, or possibly even a blistered spot.

A shorted diode is indicated by a loud humming noise from the high voltage transformer, and no heat produced when a cook cycle is initiated. Whereas little or no heat produced in your microwave, with an absence of a humming noise is indicative of an open diode. In either case, the diode has to be replaced.

With your microwave unplugged, and your capacitor discharged, use extreme caution to remove the lead that leads to the capacitor. You can leave the ground connection attached. The side of the diode that goes to the ground is usually marked with a dot, stripe, or arrow. Set your ohmmeter to R x 10,000 or higher. Touch the positive meter probe to the anode and the negative meter probe to the cathode to measure the resistance across the diode terminals. Remember that the cathode is on the side that goes to the ground, which is often marked by a dot, stripe, or an arrow.

A normal diode, that is a non-defective diode, will read anywhere from 50,000 to 200,000 ohms. Differences in microwave make and model account for this large range in resistance readings.

Reverse the meter probes and measure resistance while touching the positive probe to the cathode and the negative probe to the anode. Reversing the probes like this should result in a reading of infinity. Unless a bleeder resistor is present. The presence of a bleeder resistor would produce a reading of the value of the resistor.

High Voltage Capacitor

A capacitor is an electrical device which stores electricity. A defective capacitor may be why your microwave is not heating but you are hearing a buzzing or humming noise. The capacitor will have to be tested to determine if this is the cause of your problem. A defective capacitor will have to be replaced before your microwave will work again. Make sure you discharge the capacitor before you test it, though.

Magnetron

A defective magnetron is the third possible cause of why your microwave is not heating, but you can hear a buzzing noise. Test your microwave's magnetron. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a magnetron

NOTE: Before you test this component, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you have discharged the capacitor.

There are two tests to conduct in order to determine whether or not a magnetron has become defective. If you receive results other than what are detailed below, you will have to replace your microwave's magnetron. Each test is described for you here:

TEST 1: Locate your magnetron and label each of the wires attached to it so that you know which wires are to be replaced where. Set your ohmmeter to the lowest resistance scale. Take a resistance measurement between each of the magnetron's terminals by touching each probe to one terminal each. Reverse the probes and take a second resistance measurement. Each measurement should read less than one ohm.

TEST 2: Set your ohmmeter to its highest resistance scale. Touch one of the meter's probes to a magnetron terminal. Touch the other probe to the metal magnetron housing. Take special caution to not touch the two probes together. This could result in an inaccurate reading. This test should produce a reading of infinity - indicating an open circuit.

Read the tips on the below links on how to replace your microwave oven's diode and how to discharge the capacitor.

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088355-replace_microwave_ovens_diode

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor

I hope the above is helpful.

Take care.

Feb 15, 2011 | GE Spacemaker JVM1640SJ Microwave Oven

1 Answer

Microwave activate but will not heat food all light and buttons work but will not heat up


Sorry to read about your problem, I hope this helps you out.

You can many different issue's
  1. Blown fuse in HV transformer primary circuit or HV fuse (if used).
  2. Bad connections (particularly to magnetron filament).
  3. Open thermal protector or thermal fuse.
  4. Open HV capacitor, HV diode, HV transformer, or magnetron filament.
  5. Shorted HV diode, HV capacitor (will blow a fuse), or magnetron.
  6. Damaged protective VDR from filament to chassis (not commonly used).
  7. Defective HV relay (not commonly used).
Microwaves must be serviced by technicians due to the inherent dangers involved in repairing these appliances. Internal capacitors can retain a lethal electrical charge even though the unit is completely unplugged. A microwave radiation leakage test must be performed on the unit following any internal component repair.

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Jan 04, 2011 | GE Spacemaker JVM1640SJ Microwave Oven

1 Answer

GE JVM1440 will not heat.


Sorry to read about your problem, I hope this helps you out.

No heat but otherwise normal operation.
Possible causes:
  1. Blown fuse in HV transformer primary circuit or HV fuse (if used).
  2. Bad connections (particularly to magnetron filament).
  3. Open thermal protector or thermal fuse.
  4. Open HV capacitor, HV diode, HV transformer, or magnetron filament.
  5. Shorted HV diode, HV capacitor (will blow a fuse), or magnetron.
  6. Damaged protective VDR from filament to chassis (not commonly used).
  7. Defective HV relay (not commonly used)
Microwaves must be serviced by technicians due to the inherent dangers involved in repairing these appliances. Internal capacitors can retain a lethal electrical charge even though the unit is completely unplugged. A microwave radiation leakage test must be performed on the unit following any internal component repair.

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Jan 01, 2011 | GE JVM1440 Microwave Oven

1 Answer

Microwave won't heat, light ,clock works the microwave just won't heat the items in it.


hELLO THERE
when a microwave quits heating but every thing else is ok normally
investigate these 4 areas

Investigate these three areas if your microwave won't heat but you hear a loud buzzing or humming noise:
microwave_diode.jpg Power Diode

A diode is an electronic component that readily passes current in one direction only and blocks the flow of current in the opposing direction. If your microwave's diode has become defective, your microwave will not heat and you will hear a buzzing noise. Test the diode to determine if this is the cause of your problem. Replace it if it is defective.

picturena.gif High Voltage Capacitor

A capacitor is an electrical device which stores electricity. A defective capacitor may be why your microwave is not heating but you are hearing a buzzing or humming noise. The capacitor will have to be tested to determine if this is the cause of your problem. A defective capacitor will have to be replaced before your microwave will work again. Make sure you discharge the capacitor before you test it, though.

microwave_magnetron.jpg Magnetron

A defective magnetron is the third possible cause of why your microwave is not heating, but you can hear a buzzing noise. Test your microwave's magnetron. Replace it if it is defective.

Nov 09, 2010 | GE Spacemaker JVM1640SJ Microwave Oven

1 Answer

Model 721.64282 microwave/convection oven - microwave not heating and making a loud noise. convection oven works


No heat but otherwise normal operationA shorted HV diode, magnetron, or certain parts of the HV wiring would probably result in a loud hum from the HV transformer but will likely not blow the main fuse. (However, the HV fuse - not present on most domestic ovens - might blow.)
If the main power fuse is located in the primary of the high voltage transformer rather then at the line input, the clock and touchpad will work but the fuse will blow upon initiating a cook cycle. Or, if the fuse has already blown there will simply be no heating action once the cook cycle is started. There are other variations depending on whether the cooling fan, oven light, and so forth are located down stream of the fuse.

Some models may have a separate high voltage fuse. If this is blown, there will be no heating but no other symptoms. However, high voltage fuses are somewhat rare on domestic ovens.

A number of failures can result in the fuse NOT blowing but still no heat:


  • Bad connections - these may be almost anywhere in the microwave generator or the primary circuit of the HV transformer. A common location is at the crimp connections to the magnetron filament as they are high current and can overheat and result in no or intermittent contact. See the section: See the section: Testing the magnetron.
  • Open thermal protector - usually located on magnetron case. Test for continuity. It should read as a dead short - near zero ohms. See the section: Testing thermal protectors and thermal fuses.
  • Open thermal fuse - some ovens have one of these in the primary circuit. It may be in either connection to the HV transformer or elsewhere. Test for continuity. It should read as a dead short - near zero ohms.
  • Open HV capacitor - see the section: Testing the high voltage capacitor. A shorted HV capacitor would likely immediately blow the fuse.
  • Open HV diode - see the section: Testing the high voltage diode.
  • Open magnetron filament - This failure may also be due to loose, burnt, or deteriorated press (Fast-on) lugs for the filament connections and not an actual magnetron problem. See the section: Testing the magnetron.
  • Open winding in HV transformer. See the section: Testing the high voltage transformer.
  • Defective HV relay. A few models use a relay in the actual high voltage circuitry (rather than the primary) to regulate cooking power. This may have dirty or burnt contacts, a defective coil, or bad connections
  • Shorted HV diode - see the section: Testing the high voltage diode.
  • Short or other fault in the magnetron - see the section: Testing the magnetron.
  • Short in certain portions of the HV wiring. See the section: Testing and repairing the wiring and connections.

Depending on design, a number of other component failures could result in no heat as well including a defective relay or triac, interlock switch(s), and controller.


If you are interested in doing it yourself the following link will help : Microwave Repair Manual

(**All the above references to tests are found here)

Oct 21, 2010 | Kenmore 63663 Microwave Oven

3 Answers

JMC7000 ADQ Microwave


Most common problem is bad magnetron.
magnetron bad( filament shorts to ground), cap shorted to case, rectifier shorted, transformer bad, bad triac( only conducting 1 side of sinewave)

Nov 25, 2007 | Jenn-Air JMC7000 Microwave Oven

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