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Pilot Career Help?

Hi, I am 17 years old and a junior in high school in the United States. I have always had a love for airplanes and I have been considering trying to become a pilot for my career. I know that the training required to get your pilots license is really expensive, but I think I could manage it. My biggest concern is that once I did get my license, where would I go from there? Would I need to get a job at a major airline to start making decent money, and how realistic is it for someone to get a job there? Another question I have is are there any other types of piloting jobs that have a decent salary that would be easy/secure to get a job at? My biggest worry is that once I did get my pilots license, I would not be able to find a job anywhere and get stuck with a job with a really small pay. Any information/advice would be greatly appreciated, thanks.

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Usually, once you have a private pilot certificate you would go for an instructor rating and work as a flight instructor to build flight time (while making money). Along the way you could also be working on your commercial

Posted on Apr 10, 2017

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Usually, once you have a private pilot certificate you would go for an instructor rating and work as a flight instructor to build flight time (while making money). Along the way you could also be working on your commercial, multi engine, and air transport pilot ratings and certificates. It takes time to get into the airlines, mostly because you need to build flight time and experience. Even when you first break into the airlines the pay is kind of pathetic, but it builds quickly over time.

Posted on Feb 03, 2017

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The answer is a bit complex. To a degree, what you hear is correct - but it does not quite mean what you might otherwise think it means.

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