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Am I too late to become an airline pilot?

I'm 21 years old and currently studying in an university(financial mathematics major). I'll finish my degree in about 2 years. Now I really start to think about my future career, I don't want to sit in an office and staring at a computer doing mathematics for the rest of my life. I love travelling, I really want to be an pilot although I don't have any knowledge about aviation. my question is am I too late to become an airline pilot? Should I finish my college first and then think about becoming a pilot or just quit the college and start learning to fly now? how long it takes to become an international airline pilot? and how much does a pilot earns(regional and international)?

Posted by Mary Stegg on

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masud

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After up to 5 years of misery, you might get hired by what is called a "regional airline" -

Posted on Apr 10, 2017

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Many colleges offer flight training. Two that come to mind are UND and University of Cincinnati but there are many others. You might look into that as most airlines want a degree also. Regional airlines pay is garbage but you get raises pretty quickly as your time builds.

Posted on Feb 03, 2017

  • Mark Stull Jan 08, 2019

    Go in the military they will give you best training, that will get you started

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Jan 04, 2017 | Aircrafts

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