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Where to position the butterfly valve - Garden

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Bill Boyd

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  • Garden Master
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The butterfly valve works of the throttle control lever as the position depends on how much you open the throttle.
it is the valve closest to the head when fitting the carby

Posted on Sep 04, 2015

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It seems that the solution to the stuck choke is to take the power washer to a repair service. This did not help.


Stuck choke? Like the carburetor's choke butterfly valve? There are bushings that can be replaced in the shaft. The valve plate slides out gently with needle-nosed pliars in a top to bottom motion pulling the top loose then rocking the bottom out. The butterfly plate will only go back one way so you're kinda safe there. It's in it's correct position when the valve closes off the intake throat snugly and FREELY. You can put your opened needle-nose jaws in the breather holes of the plate and slowly twist as you move the shaft in a "choke-on" "choke-off" position repetitiously until the butterfly seats in the throat with NO HANG-UP'S. It should move very freely. Once you had the butterfly out, the choke shaft will lift out of the carb. There are bushings that seat down in the top of the carb that the shaft slides thru. If the bushings are worn so that dirt is able to enter and interfere with it's air/fuel mixture. There's also a sponge washer and possibly a spring. I'd take a pic of it before removal for reference. Not sure if that helped.

Dec 01, 2017 | Briggs & Stratton Power Products 1539...

1 Answer

How to adjust automatic choke


Procedure #1-
  1. Be sure the hook on the bimetallic spring contacts the choke shaft lever.
  2. Install the cover and retainer and lightly tighten the screws.
  3. Turn the ceramic element to align the mark on it with the middle mark on the housing.
~~~ Procedure #2-
  1. The engine must be cold to make this adjustment.
  2. Remove the air cleaner.
  3. Find the automatic choke. It's the round thing on the upper right-hand of the carburetor. There is a wire coming to it from the positive side of the coil.
  4. Note: The automatic choke is a round ceramic thing with the heating element wound inside of it. (The ceramic part may be covered with metal so that it looks just like the rest of the carburetor.) The choke is held in position by a triangular ring clamp and three screws so it can be loosened and rotated for adjustment.
  5. Pull the throttle arm on the left side of the carburetor down to free the little step arm (cam) that the screw at the top of the throttle lever rests on.
  6. Note: This stepped "cam" is connected to the butterfly valve inside the throat of the carburetor by a shaft that extends all the way into the automatic choke. With the engine cold, the butterfly valve should be closed. As the engine warms up, the coil inside the automatic choke uncoils, opens the butterfly valve, and moves the cam to reduce the idle speed.
  7. Release the throttle arm so that the return spring snaps it back. The little screw at the top of the throttle arm (again, with the engine cold) should now rest on the top step of the stepped cam. This sets the hi-idle, which is needed together with the choke on a cold engine to provide sufficient idle speed to keep the engine running until it warms up fully.
  8. Loosen the three screws on the right side that hold the choke in place.
  9. Keep your eye on the butterfly valve in the carburetor throat.
  10. Turn the choke element clockwise (viewed from the right) until the butterfly is standing straight up, then turn the choke counterclockwise (viewed from the right) until the choke butterfly fully closes (barely -- not too tightly), then tighten the three screws that hold the choke in place.
  11. Note: This is important; the automatic choke may be assembled wrong and not catching the hook on the coil spring at all.
  12. Start the engine with the air cleaner off. As the engine warms up, make sure that the butterfly opens until it is standing straight up (full open) when the engine is fully warm. If it doesn't, readjust the choke until you get it right.
  13. Note: The engine is now warm, so you won't be able to adjust the choke per the foregoing. Note the position of the notch on the side of the choke relative to the three little ridges on the body of the carburetor. If the butterfly is too far closed with the engine warm, turn the choke clockwise just a bit to straighten it up. The notch on the choke should never be too far outside of the three ridges on the body of the carburetor. If you are not able to adjust the choke using these method, something may be sticking, or perhaps the coil spring inside the canister is broken, or perhaps the wire has fallen off of the contact on the canister so that it is not getting power from the battery properly.

Jul 15, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

2004 ford f 150 5.4 3V pulled intake fixed vac hose came off replaced imrc & still show intake runner control closed bank 1 Still has no power when I get in it to pass something any ideas?


Is your check engine light on ? Any codes ?

There are three basic types of intake air sub-systems:


  • Intake Manifold Runner Control (IMRC) electric actuated system

  • Intake Manifold Swirl Control (IMSC) vacuum actuated system

  • Intake Manifold Tuning Valve (IMTV)

These subsystems are used to provide increased intake airflow to improve torque, emissions and performance. The overall quantity of air metered to the engine is controlled by the throttle body.

Intake Manifold Runner Control (IMRC) Electric Actuated System
The Intake Manifold Runner Control (IMRC) Electric Actuated system (Figure 107) consists of a remote mounted motorized actuator with an attaching cable for each housing on each bank. Some applications will use one cable for both banks. The cable or linkage attaches to the housing butterfly plate levers. The 2.0L (2V) Focus IMRC uses a motorized actuator mounted directly to a single housing without the use of a cable. Each IMRC housing is an aluminum casting with two intake air passages for each cylinder. One passage is always open and the other is opened and closed with a butterfly valve plate. The housing uses a return spring to hold the butterfly valve plates closed. The motorized actuator houses an internal switch or switches, depending on the application, to provide feedback to the PCM indicating cable and butterfly valve plate position.



Below approximately 3000 rpm, the motorized actuator will not be energized. This will allow the cable to fully extend and the butterfly valve plates to remain closed. Above approximately 3000 rpm, the motorized actuator will be energized. The attaching cable will pull the butterfly valve plates into the open position. Some vehicles will activate the IMRC near 1500 rpm.



WARNING: SUBSTANTIAL OPENING AND CLOSING TORQUE IS APPLIED BY THIS SYSTEM. TO PREVENT INJURY, BE CAREFUL TO KEEP FINGERS AWAY FROM LEVER MECHANISMS WHEN ACTUATED.




  1. The PCM uses the TP sensor and CKP signals to determine activation of the IMRC system. There must be a positive change in voltage from the TP sensor along with the increase in rpm to open the valve plates.




  1. The PCM uses the information from the input signals to control the IMRC motorized actuator based upon rpm and changes in throttle position.




  1. The PCM energizes the actuator to pull the butterfly plates open with the cable(s) or linkage.




  1. The IMRC housing contains butterfly plates to allow increased air flow.

Jun 29, 2015 | Ford Cars & Trucks

6 Answers

Why is my pt cruiser stalling out at idle


Lots of great suggestions have been made by other contributors. I just have to go with my own experience and have you check that your electric cooling fan is kicking on. I lived in a hot climate, driving in city traffic, and the brushes in that motor wore out after just a couple of years and kept the car from performing properly at idle due to an overheating engine. Most of my mysterious engine problems went away once the engine compartment was cooling properly again.

Jan 05, 2015 | 2002 Chrysler PT Cruiser

1 Answer

On a 78 Scottsdale pickup 350 engine 4 bbl holley


the vacuum advance line will be connected on a pipe at the closed position of the throttle butterfly. The pcv valve hose goes into the manifold under the carby

Sep 28, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Motor runs at too high a speed. Throttle cable has no effect except to shut the motor off.


running fast would be a governer problem. wont idle sounds like a fuel problem. try cleaning carb. no power sounds like valve problems. if you feel profiecient make sure valves are sealing properly and ck. clearances.

Jun 10, 2013 | Heavy Machinery

1 Answer

2006 chevy monte carlo 3.5 v6 tps replacement


A THROTTLE POSITION SENSOR (TPS) is usually located on the butterfly spindle so that it can directly monitor the position of the throttle valve butterfly.
Throttle actuator control(TAC), that code comes from that part of the system too.

7gigkaaaaasuvork5cyii=
Throttle body showing the sensor on the right.

Feb 07, 2012 | 2006 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

1 Answer

I have a 32-36 weber on my 1641cc vw engine.it has a big lift cam,so it has low vuccum on idle.i can not get it to idle.can you help me. i have tried to weaken the power valve spring to compensait for the...


altering the compensating valve has nothing to do with the idle circuit
the compensating valve is what gives extra fuel for acceleration ( accelerator pump)
putting a hole in the butterfly is making for less vacuum as vacuum happens when the air flow in the manifold is restricted--not lessened
what you need to do is enlarge the idle circuit port to let more air past the butterfly, increase idle jet size or increase the idle rpms to around 1200 rpms as high lift cams are not idling cams
The cam you should have used is an extended duration cam which has the same lift as a standard cam but has control of the valve over more degrees of rotation
same effect with less lumpy running

May 31, 2017 | 1978 Ford Granada

2 Answers

Throttle sticks at times when starting out. Hear a popping sound and throttle moves easily then


there is a throttle-stop, this prevents the throttle valve getting stuck in the bore, put simply the valve is a perfet fit and if it fully closes it is liable to get stuck in that position, so a "stop" is employed to keep the throttle just a tiny bit open, but without increasing the idle speed, it is similar to an idle-control screw. tighten this a little, so it keeps the throttle a little more open - check this diagram to find the stop adjuster screw.09aa699.png

Nov 06, 2009 | 2000 Chevrolet Silverado

1 Answer

WHICH IS THE CHOKE POSITION (---) (I) ON POSITION I OR 0


(---) is choke on

( I ) is choke off.

This symbol represents the butterfly valve in the carburetor. When it's straight up, the butterfly valve is not restricting the air flow, therefore, it is not choking. Vice versa for the other symbol.

Charlie

Aug 31, 2009 | Garden

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