Question about Garden

1 Answer

Can I get a wiring diagram for my 1949 farmall cub tractor emailed to me?

6 volt positive ground system with magneto(not spark coil) ignition.

Posted by Robert Zisk on

Ad

1 Answer

Dennis Key

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    Superstar:

    An expert that got 20 achievements.

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

  • Garden Master
  • 2,481 Answers

May help a little can I get a wiring diagram for my 1949 farmall cub - 28e72b86-cf1b-456c-a48d-5f4b915394e7.jpg

Posted on Aug 27, 2014

Ad

1 Related Answer

Bill Boyd

  • 53816 Answers

SOURCE: 1953 farmall super a tractor having points issue.

Check for a small braided copper wire that is attached to the point plate to the body of the distributor, Check that the wire terminal to the point is in fact not shorting out as ther should be a stepped fibre washer between the wire and the point base as there can be no contact until the power gets to the movable point. Check that the movable point is not touching the point base

Posted on Mar 03, 2013

Ad

Add Your Answer

×

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How can I tell if my coil pack to my 1980 Suzuki is good


Remove spark plug, reattach spark plug wire, ground bottom of plug to bare metal on engine head and crank the ignition. If you get sparks its probably good. If you have no spark and are trying to determine if it is your magneto or coil you will have to use a volt meter.

Apr 27, 2016 | Suzuki Motorcycles

1 Answer

How will I know the coil has gone bad on my mower?


If you have a bad coil, you have no spark at spark plug. Ignition coil(s)/Magnetos generally don't fail, but been known to. General cause for no ignition (spark) is usually caused by bad or misadjusted safety switches and possible connection issues between terminal(s) and switch. To see if you have spark at spark plug, remove the plug from cylinder head and rest the end of the plug where it is close to metal (Ground). Crank engine and see if you have spark. If you have spark, your coil is working. If you don't have spark, verify that the safety switch system is fully functional and adjusted properly before ruling out that the coil/magneto is at fault. Hope this helps.

Oct 08, 2013 | Husqvarna Garden

1 Answer

2005 grand am wont start


see this steps and fix it. God bless you
When the engine cranks normally but won't start, you need to check ignition, fuel and compression. Ignition is easy enough to check with a spark tester or by positioning a plug wire near a good ground. No spark? The most likely causes would be a failed ignition module, distributor pickup or cranshaft position sensor CKP

A tool such as an Ignition System Simulator can speed the diagnosis by quickly telling you if the ignition module and coil are capable of producing a spark with a simulated timing input signal. If the simulated signal generates a spark, the problem is a bad distributor pickup or crankshaft position sensor. No spark would point to a bad module or coil. Measuring ignition coil primary and secondary resistance can rule out that component as the culprit.
Module problems as well as pickup problems are often caused by loose, broken or corroded wiring terminals and connectors. Older GM HEI ignition modules are notorious for this. If you are working on a distributorless ignition system with a Hall effect crankshaft position sensor, check the sensor's reference voltage (VRef) and ground. The sensor must have 5 volts or it will remain permanently off and not generate a crank signal (which should set a fault code). Measure VRef between the sensor power supply wire and ground (use the engine block for a ground, not the sensor ground circuit wire). Don't see 5 volts? Then check the sensor wiring harness for loose or corroded connectors. A poor ground connection will have the same effect on the sensor operation as a bad VRef supply. Measure the voltage drop between the sensor ground wire and the engine block. More than a 0.1 voltage drop indicates a bad ground connection. Check the sensor mounting and wiring harness.
If a Hall effect crank sensor has power and ground, the next thing to check would be its output. With nothing in the sensor window, the sensor should be "on" and read 5 volts (VRef). Measure the sensor D.C. output voltage between the sensor signal output wire and ground (use the engine block again, not the ground wire). When the engine is cranked, the sensor output should drop to zero every time the shutter blade, notch, magnetic button or gear tooth passes through the sensor. No change in voltage would indicate a bad sensor that needs to be replaced.
If the primary side of the ignition system seems to be producing a trigger signal for the coil but the voltage is not reaching the plugs, a visual inspection of the coil tower, distributor cap, rotor and plug wires should be made to identify any defects that might be preventing the spark from reaching its intended destination.


10_16_2012_5_39_14_am.jpg10_16_2012_5_39_50_am.gif

Oct 16, 2012 | 2005 Pontiac Grand Am

1 Answer

SKIPPING PROBLEM . SPARK PLUGS & WIRES HAS BEEN DONE. THERE'S NO 12 VOLTS AT THE COIL CONNECTOR PLUG WITH THE KEY ON. LYMAN


Sound like a ground problem; the fastest way to identify the Power and Ground Circuits is using a wiring diagram. If you don't have one you'll have to find out by trial and error as you probe each circuit.

The power circuit is tested with the Key On and Engine Off. Place one end of your multimeter or Test Light on the Battery Negative Terminal and with the other end, probe the Power Circuit. Turn the Key to the Run position. If the Power Circuit is OK, the Multimeter will show 12 Volts or the Test Light will light up. Here are the possible results:
* You got 12 Volts on the Power Circuit
Good, this is a good sign. The next step is to check the Ground Circuit of the Coil on Plug connector that you're testing.

* No Power in only one Ignition Coil
Without 12 Volts, the Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil will not work, thus you have just eliminated that specific Ignition Coil as the source of the fault. Replacing the Ignition Coil with a new one will only be a waste of time and money since, without Power the new one will not Spark.
Since the Power Circuit is shared by all of the coils on the majority of Coil-on-Plug Ignition Systems. The most likely cause will be an open short in that Ignition Coil's Power Circuit.
You'll have to consult your Repair Manual's wiring diagrams to make sure how everything is wired up.
After repairing the short, re-do the Spark Test to verify the Ignition Coil is now working.

* No Power at any Ignition Coils
The fuse or relay that supplies this voltage is blown or BAD.
You'll have to consult your Repair Manual's wiring diagrams to see where this fuse and/or relay is located and replace as necessary.
After replacing the blown fuse or the defective relay. Retest the Ignition Coil.

Them, the Ground Circuit is tested with the Key On or Off. It doesn't matter because this is a Chassis Ground. Place one end of your multimeter or Test Light on the Battery Positive Terminal and with the other end, probe the Ground Circuit. If the Ground Circuit is OK, the Multimeter will show 12 Volts or the Test Light will light up.

* You got Ground
Good, now the next step is to verify that the Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil is receiving the Triggering Signal. This info belongs to the next section of this article.

* No Ground in only one Ignition Coil
Without this Ground, the Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil will not work, thus you have just eliminated that specific Ignition Coil as the source of the fault. Replacing the Ignition Coil with a new one will only be a waste of time and money since, without Ground the new one will not Spark.
Since the Ground Circuit is shared by all of the coils on the majority of Coil-on-Plug Ignition Systems. The most likely cause will be an open short in that Ignition Coil's Ground Circuit.
You'll have to consult your Repair Manual's wiring diagrams to make sure how everything is wired up.
After repairing the short, re-do the Spark Test to verify the Ignition Coil is now working.

* No Ground at any Ignition Coils
This usually happens thru' human error in most cases and is a very rare thing. Usually the engine was replaced and this ground was not re-attached.
You can Ground this circuit with a jumper wire. Jumpering to Ground just one Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coil should provide Ground to all of them (consult your Repair Manual's Wiring Diagrams to be sure).
With this jumper wire to Ground attached, crank the vehicle.
If in fact the Ground Circuit does have an open short, this (the jumper wire to Ground) should make the vehicle start, or at least get the Ignition Coil to Spark.
Repair the open short and retest for Spark or retry starting the vehicle.


Hope this helps. Keep us updated.

Aug 19, 2011 | 2003 Chrysler Town & Country

1 Answer

Changing from Pos ground generating system to Neg ground 1 wire alternator system. need wiring diagram. At present the minute the key is turned the engine starts tuning over. wiring had been...


It would seem best to just remove all of the original low voltage wiring completely. You won't need the 'cutout' device any more as the diodes in the alternator will replace that function. Does the ignition switch have a 'start' position? If not, then suggest finding a normally-open push button switch for a start button. Is the ignition system a points/coil/capacitor unit or a magneto. If a magneto, it needs to be grounded with a kill switch. If the points/coil system, then the key should apply power to the coil connection through a doubled resistor when running. You will also need a 12 volt battery of course. Change the starter solenoid to a 12 volt unit. The starter will draw about double the current used at 6 volts, but will likely survive if you don't 'grind' the engine. Depending on the tractor, there may be a 12 volt starter available that will fit. If you have an ammeter, it should be in series with the battery connection at the starter solenoid and the ignition, lights, and any other light loads (never in series with the large starter cable). That should cover most of your concerns, but understanding what I have written may be a concern. I don't have a wiring diagram specifically, so I hope this helps!

Sep 11, 2010 | Garden

1 Answer

With the ign. sw in the on position should i have voltage on yellow wire ging to coil


The ignition switch on a chainsaw operates on a ground. When the switch is "on" the coil is not grounded out, and the magneto can supply power to the coil. When it is "off" the coil is grounded, and no power gets to the coil. If you are checking for spark you can bypass the switch by removing the wire to the coil. It may just be a bad switch. A two stroke motor uses magnets to power the coil through the magneto. If the switch is grounding out there may be no spark!

Aug 21, 2010 | Garden

1 Answer

Car cranks but wont start


ENGINE CRANKS BUT WILL NOT START
When the engine cranks normally but won't start, you need to check ignition, fuel and"http://www.aa1car.com/library/compression.htm". Ignition is easy enough to check with a spark tester or by positioning a plug wire near a good ground. No spark? The most likely causes would be a failed ignition module, distributor pickup or "http://www.aa1car.com/library/crank_sensors.htm".
A tool such as an Ignition System Simulator can speed the diagnosis by quickly telling you if the ignition module and coil are capable of producing a spark with a simulated timing input signal. If the simulated signal generates a spark, the problem is a bad distributor pickup or crankshaft position sensor. No spark would point to a bad module or coil. Measuring ignition coil primary and secondary resistance can rule out that component as the culprit.
Module problems as well as pickup problems are often caused by loose, broken or corroded wiring terminals and connectors. Older HEI ignition modules are notorious for this. If you are working on a distributorless ignition system with a Hall effect crankshaft position sensor, check the sensor's reference voltage (VRef) and ground. The sensor must have 5 volts or it will remain permanently off and not generate a crank signal (which should set a fault code). Measure VRef between the sensor power supply wire and ground (use the engine block for a ground, not the sensor ground circuit wire). Don't see 5 volts? Then check the sensor wiring harness for loose or corroded connectors. A poor ground connection will have the same effect on the sensor operation as a bad VRef supply. Measure the voltage drop between the sensor ground wire and the engine block. More than a 0.1 voltage drop indicates a bad ground connection. Check the sensor mounting and wiring harness.
If a Hall effect crank sensor has power and ground, the next thing to check would be its output. With nothing in the sensor window, the sensor should be "on" and read 5 volts (VRef). Measure the sensor D.C. output voltage between the sensor signal output wire and ground (use the engine block again, not the ground wire). When the engine is cranked, the sensor output should drop to zero every time the shutter blade, notch, magnetic button or gear tooth passes through the sensor. No change in voltage would indicate a bad sensor that needs to be replaced.
If the primary side of the ignition system seems to be producing a trigger signal for the coil but the voltage is not reaching the plugs, a visual inspection of the coil tower, distributor cap, rotor and plug wires should be made to identify any defects that might be preventing the spark from reaching its intended destination.----
thanks for using fixya,please do rate the solution positively.

Feb 17, 2010 | 1996 Acura RL

1 Answer

WONT START


Not so many reasons she won't start. 4-Strokes are Simple!

Here they are:

Motor:
Fuel Tank-> Fuel Line-> Fuel Filter-> Carb-> Intake (Valve)-> Piston-> Exhaust (Valve)-> Muffler

Carb (Old Style):
Fuel Side:
Fuel Bowl-> Float-> Needle Seat-> Fuel Ports (Venturi)
Air Side:
Air Filter-> Carb Air Intake-> Butterflies (2)
(Clean 'em ALL!)

Hardware (Motor):
Rotor (Magnets)-> Magneto (Ignition Coil)-> Spark Plug Wire-> Spark Plug-> Cylinder Head (Spark Plug Ground)

Ignition:
Kill Switches (Seat, Clutch, etc.)-> Spark Plug/Ignition Coil-> Ground
Key Ignition-> Battery->Starter/Generator

If one of those fail.......= Non-Starting 4-Stroke!

Fixes-
Fuel:
You are either getting too much, or too little. Too much = Carb.
Too little = Carb. Therefore, tear down the Carb (COMPLETELY-Careful!) and clean it up.

Electrical:
Grounding out the System (Kill Switches)
Battery-> Ignition-> Starter.
Magneto->Plug Wire->Plug (Check 'em all!)


May 28, 2009 | Mtd Garden

4 Answers

Poulan Pro 200 Leaf Blower won't start. I have installed a carb kit with no results. The spark plug was wet before the new kit---it continues to be wet. I have tried a replacement spark plug with no...


Alright, remember that 2-Stroke motors are meant to do 2 things:
Break down, then Frustrate you.

So, here we go: (Electrical)

Rotor Magnets, Magneto (ignition coil), Spark Plug Wire, Spark Plug, Spark Plug Ground (Cylinder Head).

In that order!

Check your "fire" from the Magneto:

1. Check your Kill Switch. In other words, leave everything normal, and unhook it. Did she start? Kill Switch it is! Kill Switch/Wire comes from the Magneto (single wire/ground) to the Switch itself. So check that wire AT the Magneto (Is it loose and grounding out? Is the Kill Switch grounding you out where it is, because of crud, junk, or because it is touching the block when it is not supposed to?)

2. Check your Spark Plug Wire. Easy, unook it from the plug, stick your finger in, give it a crank (non-MultiMeter way). Did you get shocked? Then it ain't your Plug Wire and Magneto!

With a Multi-/Volt Meter, simply hook her up, and check for juice WHEN you pull the rope. If you got juice, it ain't your Plug Wire or Magneto!

Checking Spark the "normal" way: Grab the Plug with a pair of insulated pliers, hold the plug end against the cylinder head, and pull your rope. Any Spark? What color?

3. STILL no fire. It leaves: Magneto and Plug Wire.
Luckily, they are both in the same place! Tear your blower down, and check to see if the Magneto has slipped out of place (gap is WAY out), or if the Plug Wire has worn to the point it is grounding you out. While you are there, check your Kill Switch wire, to see if she is grounding you out then and there.

4. STILL no fire. That means: Magneto Failing, or Magneto JUNK.
Buy another one, replace it! (Or steal one from another junk Blower/Weedeater. These things are fairly standard, and easy!)
Or, Bad Plug Wire. Meaning she has failed out on you.
Wait......that means: Replace your Magneto! Lucky the things are built together right?

Apr 22, 2009 | Poulan/Weed Eater No. Bvm200le 711482 24cc...

2 Answers

1990 Subaru Legacy shorted out the ignition coil. I replaced it and in less than 1 mile,it shorted out the new one.


Subaru engines (including Legacy and engines of many other automobiles, GM, etc.) have returned to so-called wasted spark ignition systems since advent of the electronic distributor-less ignition (having been used historically in early engines with magneto ignitions). With this approach, the ignition systems are less expensive and usually quite reliable. At the same time, however, a shorted spark plug (cracked or carbon clogged, etc.) (or bad ignition spark plug wire) grounds both the ignition spark and the false spark being used. This means that it also grounds the corresponding respective ignition spark of the other 180 degree out of phase cylinder (that uses the same the same coil because the spark current is connected to the spark plugs of two cylinders). Since such a defect allows more current to flow in the spark coil to two plugs when the resistance of the spark plug gap disappears due to a cracked plug, etc, it seems likely to hasten coil burn out if the spark plug/plug wire defect is not corrected before installing the new spark coil.

To explain further, wasted spark means that when a cylinder is ready to fire, it gets a spark to its spark plug while part of the spark (from the same coil and current) as a sort of copy is also sent to another cyclinder at the same time but when the piston in that cylinder is exhausting its ignited gases 180 degrees out of phase from when its spark is needed. When the second cylinder is ready to fire and receives its "spark, the first cyclinder the also receivesa "wasted" spark "copy" of the one needed by the second cylinder. Economy is achieved in manufacture because otherwise electronics would have to turn on and off four different spark coils to distribute four different sparks as needed to the four cylinders. With wasted sparks (which are cheap), because the spark current of one coil is connected (internally in the ignition coil unit) to two cylinders that are in the same position but 180 degrees out of phase in firing, the system can turn on and off two spark coils twice as fast with half the electronics and fire two cylinders that are 180 degrees out of phase. A four cylinder engine thus uses only two coils, a six cylinder engine, three coils, etc., in a wasted spark system.

Jul 27, 2008 | Subaru Legacy Cars & Trucks

Not finding what you are looking for?
Garden Logo

Related Topics:

1,245 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Garden Experts

Dennis Key
Dennis Key

Level 3 Expert

2481 Answers

john h

Level 3 Expert

23504 Answers

Marvin
Marvin

Level 3 Expert

85239 Answers

Are you a Garden Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...