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What is an ISO on the camera - Samsung Digimax S500 Digital Camera

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kakima

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The ISO setting controls the sensitivity of the image sensor, analogous to the film speed in analog photography. The more sensitive the sensor, the less light is needed, allowing for faster shutter speed and/or smaller aperture. The downside is that by making the sensor more sensitive, it's more susceptible to "noise," making the picture look "grainier," just like with faster film.

Posted on May 27, 2014

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0helpful
2answers

ISO DX ERR

What speed film? Does the roll have the DX markings (the black-and-silver rectangles)? If it doesn't, what happens if you set the film speed manually?
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Iso led keeps flashing on my eos 10s

clean the iso detect pins in the film chamber, and check to make sure they are not bent
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How do i change my iso setting

Your camera is capable of ISO adjustments from 100 to 1600. Photos taken at ISO 100 require the longest exposures and will have the best quality color and least amount of graininess. This setting should be used as often as possible and is ideal for well lit subjects. Conversely, ISO 1600 is for low light situations. Photos taken with the camera set to this value will have muddied colors and much more graininess in them. This is often preferred to having no photo at all.

The down side to this camera - like most point & shoot ("P&S") types, is the fact the the light sensor that actually captures the image from the lens, is quite small. Small sensors have difficulty rendering acceptable photos when taken at high ISO settings. It is not unusual for P&S cameras to perform unacceptably at ISO 400 and up. Reviews I have seen on your camera back this up. Basically, ISO 100 and 200 are the only values that provide acceptable photos. You should experiment with the entire range of ISO under different lighting conditions to see which situations and ISOs are acceptable to you.

Your camera makes use of icons to access menus and they do not show up well on FixYa, so I will need direct you to an online manual that you can view or download. It can be found here.

Chapter 3 (begins on Page 16) talks about camera menu settings. Your should review this chapter, and pay particular attention to "ISO" on page 20. You will learn how to select ISO 100, 200, 400, 800 & 1600 on the camera.

I hope this helps & good luck!
0helpful
2answers

What is the ISO

The letters ISO on your digital camera settings refer to the film speed. Even though your camera is most likely not film at all, but rather digital, the ISO setting still does has the same function as older film cameras. ISO determines how sensitive the image sensor is to light.
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1answer

I bought this canon rebel t2 film camera recently and used film with ASO 400. Portraits look ok. but the landscapes, especially the sky area look dark and grainy. I used ef 28-135mm usm lens. Any solutions...

That's odd that the pictures would be coming out under exposed unless the previous owner has gone into the camera functions and switched the ISO from auto to manual. Another reason is that the exposure compensation has been activated and set for - exposure

Under "normal" use the camera will read the DX code on the film canisters and adjust the ISO automatically. However the previous owner may have shut this off in preference to setting the ISO manually. Even though you have ISO 400 in the camera the ISO on in the camera setting may be ISO 1600.

Checking for the Auto ISO and exposure compensation is fairly easy as you can see the film canister through the film window or you know you have loaded 400 speed film. on the LCD panel at the back of the camera is an ISO icon and exposure compensation.

Make sure the ISO for the camera is the same as what you have loaded and if the exposure compensation is to the right of 0 then the resulting picture will be dark. Move this back to the Zero.

I wasn't able to find an exact manual (if you don't have one) for your camera but have found a camera with similar. Here is a ling for that manual.

http://www.butkus.org/chinon/canon/canon_eos_rebel_ti/canon_eos_rebel_ti.htm

Hope this was a help
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1answer

My pictures are blurry/horrible.

(*)First set your camera for the maximum number of pixels for the memory card in the camera at the time. Or put another way, use the setting that gives the least number of pictures for the card in the camera.
(*)Second, your ISO speed is too high, use ISO 400 under bad lighting conditions, ISO 200 bright sun, ISO 100 even better if you are young and can how the camera steady.
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I have a ricoh kr-30sp camera will not come on and what kind of film do I use

With the camera turned on, look in the viewfinder. Down on the bottom right side is an LCD display, if it's blank then your camera probably has dead batteries. It takes 2 x CR1/3N or 4 x SR44.

Your film accepts 35mm negative film or 35mm transparency (aka slide) film. It will accept any ISO from 12 to 3200, but in practice all you'll usually need are ISO 100, ISO 200 or ISO 400. You choose the film based upon lighting conditions and the lenses you'll be using, but in general you'll use ISO 100 if shooting mainly outdoors in daylight, ISO 400 if shooting in low light or with a telephoto lens, and ISO 200 is a general all-rounder good for most things. ISO is usually referred to as film speed as higher numbers need less exposure than lower numbers but the trade-off is a less detailed image.

To load film into your camera and to set the camera to match the film ISO setting refer to this link to the manual provided by Norman Butkus. The manual will also guide you through all other aspects of operating your camera.

I hope that I have fully answered your question, but if not please add a comment and I shall respond in due course. If your question has been answered, then please let me know by taking a moment to rate my answer.
0helpful
1answer

I need to change the iso setting on my camera but cannot remember how to do it fuji s602zoom

ISO can be changed in P, S. A and M mode only.
You cannot change the ISO in AUTO or SP mode.
Press Menu/OK and use < and > to select ISO. Use
up and down arrow to change the ISO. Press OK
2helpful
2answers

How to adjust the ISO from 100

All of the AUTO ISO settings would be harder to figure out if you couldn't set an ISO range for the camera to use, but with the K20D you can:
  1. Press the Fn button
  2. Press the right directional arrow to select the ISO setting
  3. Set the ISO to AUTO
  4. Turn the front control dial to set the MINIMUM ISO the camera will use
  5. Turn the rear control dial to set the MAXIMUM ISO the camera will use
In this sense, you can set the AUTO sensitivity of the camera to range between ISO 100 and 400 or even ISO 800 to 6400 (if you so desire).
Of course, this assumes that you'll want to have this level of control over ISO, aperture and shutter speed.
If you don't have a good command of these controls and really never want to, then the K20D has a ton of modes and features that you'll simply never use.
Please rate the help to keep the FREE service online ++++
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