Question about RCA TH1101 MP3 Player

4 Answers

Won't play any songs.

Some music plays, such as wma files, the MP3 files either do not play or are fast forwarding itself and now after I had updated with the firmware it displays a distorted message after the Pearl screen.

Posted by pathollywood on

  • 3 more comments 
  • CallyOop Nov 26, 2007

    I loaded 5 songs onto my player (RCA TH1101). The song titles and other info shows in the window of the player, but there is no sound. I have tried dragging songs from Yahoo Jukebox, which I can not stand. I then tried sync-ing a playlist in Media player 11 and adding to the player, but that didn't work either. I feel like throwing this inferior device.

  • Anonymous Jul 27, 2008

    My RCA H125PA keeps skipping songs and interrupting what i was currently listening to with a song i just heard

  • tra2569 Jul 29, 2008

    songs play but skip all the time more matter what song i,m on and i can,t delete the songs on it now

  • south_ak47 Mar 13, 2009

    I ran out of battery so I replaced it and now I only have 3/4 of the songs and majority of them skip (fast forward).
    Anyone have a solution?


  • shar_bell Apr 25, 2009

    What kind of site is this where there are no answers to anything

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4 Answers

Anonymous

My RCA MP3 player (Th 1101) just stopped working all of a sudden. We changed the battery, made sure "HOLD" wasn't on, but it still won't turn on. Is this thing just a cheap piece of **** and won't work anymore, or is there a solution to my problem?

Contact me at

Posted on Jul 25, 2008

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Anonymous

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My RCA MP3 player (Th 1101) just stopped working all of a sudden. We changed the battery, made sure "HOLD" wasn't on, but it still won't turn on. Is this thing just a cheap piece of **** and won't work anymore, or is there a solution to my problem?

Contact me

Posted on Jul 25, 2008

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Anonymous

My RCA MP3 player (Th 1101) just stopped working all of a sudden. We changed the battery, made sure "HOLD" wasn't on, but it still won't turn on. Is this thing just a cheap piece of **** and won't work anymore, or is there a solution to my problem?

Contact

Posted on Jul 25, 2008

Joeman520

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I had this problem with my player (th 1101) when I was transferring songs from iMesh. After awhile I found out that even though I could listen to the files on the computer some wouldn't go on the mp3 player. Looked it up and there is an encoding on some tracks (preimium tracks they call it) that unless you pay for them they won't transfer off the computer (CD, MP3 players ect.). They also had free tracks that works just fine. Hope that helps

Posted on Dec 02, 2007

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Why do i get format error when i put songs from a cd on the eclipse?


Hi,

1. Why do i get format error when i put songs from a cd on the eclipse?
= This is probably because the format that your songs are currently in is not supported by your device. Supported devices on the Mach Speed Eclipse 180 MP3 player are: mp3, wav, and wma. If your music is for example filename.cda, it won't be able to play because of the file format being .cda.


2. I also see the song on the eclipse but it says drm protected and will not play the song.
= When ripping your music, check your ripping options in whichever ripping software you are using that protecting music files is off, this may be the reason why your music cannot play - it may be protected to only play on the computer that ripped(recorded or duplicated) the song.

Sep 17, 2012 | Mach Speed Eclipse 180 MP3 Player

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Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part II by Tha Mp3 Doctor WMA files are...


Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part II
by Tha Mp3 Doctor

WMA files are special. There are two types of WMA file, and the Mp3 or digital Audio Player documentation will not always tell which of these two types the Mp3 player will recognize. Type I is a non-licensed, or non-DRM-protected WMA file. DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is Microsoft’s copyright system for music files. If you have a type of Mp3 player that will only accept non-DRM protected files, the product specs for your player will NOT mention the words "DRM" or "Windows Plays ForSure" on them (unless they are using it in the negative, such as "this player does NOT support DRM encryption"). In MOST cases (there are more and more exceptions), Windows Media Player will convert songs from CD’s that you personally bought from the store into non-DRM encrypted WMA format.

The second type of WMA file is a DRM-encrypted WMA file, and there are several subtypes of these. Every DRM-encrypted file can have "play rights," "burn rights," and "transfer rights." "Play rights" mean you can play the song on your computer, "burn rights" mean you can burn the song to CD, and "transfer rights" mean you can transfer the song to your Mp3 player. Once again, not all WMA files are created equal. If you have a BASIC subscription to a music service such as Napster, you may download songs that have "play rights" – you can play them on your computer without any problem; but they may lack burn rights and transfer rights – so you cannot burn them to CD, or transfer them to your Mp3 player without incident. The solution here is to upgrade your music service to the premium, more expensive subscription that includes burn rights and transfer rights.

Then there are "fixed-term" licenses and "unlimited" licenses on WMA files. A fixed-term license will expire after so many days, months, or years; and will require you to resynchronize your songs to the music service or to your computer in order to continue playing them. This is a key reason behind songs "disappearing." Napster and Rhapsody are two examples of music services with fixed-term licenses. You must resynchronize your Mp3 player to your computer every 30 days, and you must keep you music service subscription active. If you let your subscription lapse, then the songs that were once working will no longer be playable. Once again, the only remedies are to renew your music service subscription (legal), convert those songs into a different format that the Mp3 player will recognize (possibly illegal), or to use DRM-removal software (illegal and unreliable).

One word needs to be said about burning your own personal CD’s and transferring them to the Mp3 player. CD’s naturally put song files into CDA format. Most Mp3 players do not recognize CDA format. So you will have to use Windows Media Player (easiest, IMO) or some other software to convert the CDA files into Mp3, WMA, or some other format that your Mp3 player recognizes, BEFORE you can transfer them to the Mp3 player.

Real Audio files also have an encryption system, and may not work with most Mp3 players – check your product documentation.

Audiobooks are in their own format and bring their own special problems which fall outside the scope of this article.

There are a ton of music services out there. iTunes uses AAC format. Napster, Rhapsody, Bearshare, Spiral Frog, and many others use DRM-protected WMA format nowadays. Limewire and Morpheus generally use Mp3 or non-DRM-encrypted files. Double check the formats that your player will support BEFORE choosing a music service. Conversely, if you already have a music service, choose an mp3 player that’s right for your particular service. Note: most store workers do not have the faintest idea of what I have been discussing in this article, so don’t trust their judgment – educate yourself first.

AS A GENERAL RULE OF THUMB (as always, there are exceptions), all Mp3 players recognize the Mp3 file format. The Mp3 file format is the least problematic of all the file formats. It takes up less space on your Mp3 player than most file formats – so you can load more songs onto your player than if you were using other formats. So, if you download all of your songs into Mp3 format, or tell Windows Media Player to convert your own CD’s into Mp3 format, then you will rarely go wrong.

on Jun 09, 2008 | iRiver H340 MP3 Player

2 Answers

My mp3 says file format error when I try to listen to the music.


It's possible that the file type of the music file(s) you are trying to listen to are not a supported format of your mp3 player. Your player only supports MP3 and WMA audio formats. You should check the music files you are tying to play to confirm they are of a compatible format.

http://www.cobyusa.com/files/manuals/MP300_MN.pdf

Mar 02, 2011 | Coby MP300 MP3 Player

1 Answer

Technical details and dealer in kerala ( Cochin )


Technical Details
  • Brand Name: Coby
  • Model: MP300-1GBLK
  • Digital Storage Capacity: 1 GB
  • Color Name: black
  • Battery Average Life: 8 Hours
  • Supported Audio Format: MP3 // WMA
  • Display: LCD
  • Hardware Platform: PC
  • Width: 3.6 inches
  • Depth: 0.7 inches
  • Weight: 0.2 pounds
Product Features
  • MP3 player with LCD 1 GB flash memory and USB drive
  • high-contrast LCD display with 7-color backlight
  • plays MP3 and WMA digital music files, ID3 tag support for song information display, mobile data storage function
  • convenient integrated USB plug( no cables required)
  • USB 2.0 hi-speed for fast file transfers
Product Description Coby MP300-1GBLK MP3 player 1 GB flash memory and USB drive with LCD, high-contrast LCD display with 7-color backlight, plays MP3 and WMA digital music files, ID3 tag support for song information display, mobile data storage function, convenient integrated USB plug( no cables required), USB 2.0 hi-speed for fast file transfers, black.

Batteries: 1 AAA batteries required.

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1 Answer

SwiMP3 (128 MB) MP3 Player: I have the original first version of the Swimp3 pl...


This could actually be an easy fix. If you have any files on the player that are not WMA or MP3 files, or that you've stored your music in folders - either way it could simply stop the drive from playing.

Incompatible Music Files: If you have loaded a music file that is not compatible, it simply won't play. The SwiMP3 player works with mp3 or wma files, but not aac (like from iTunes).

Solution: Remove the incompatible files. Convert your other music files to mp3 or wma, and if you are importing your songs direct from itunes, you'll need to convert them to mp3s first.



Incompatible NON-Music Files: An MP3 player is similar to a Thumb Drive or Flash Drive because it can hold any kind of file that will fit in the drive's capacity. However, if you have loaded an incompatible file - including JPEGs, Cover Art, Word Docs, anything that is not an MP3 or WMA file, the player simply can't translate it into music.

Solution: Remove the incompatible files, leaving only your mp3 or wma files in your root directory.



Folders: The mp3 player is not able to open folders and play music files stored inside, to the Swimp3 player the folder is simply an un-playable file.

Solution: Open the folders, move or copy the music files into the root directory (remember, mp3 or wma - not aac), then delete the folders.

I hope you find this helpful.

Michelle
Swimp3 Troubleshooting Video





May 18, 2010 | Finis Swi MP3 Player

1 Answer

Nextar MA933A-20P will only play factory installed files.Music files add are present but will not play. Will only shuttle between classical and fast dance files


The following may help:
1) Ensure that your Music files are of the correct format (usually .MP3 or .WMA suffix and usually NOT .WAV which is the standard CD format)
2) Ensure that you upload your music .MP3 or .WMA files to the correct directory and names are not excessively long as some MP3 will limit the max name length. If you know a working song on your MP3, locate the directory it resides in and put your songs there. 3) If you have uploaded your songs with the correct naming convention/suffix and you now see them in your player list but they will not play, then your MP3/WMA file has non-compatible 'property' whcih is usually the encoding 'bit rate' (usually anything under 128mbps fix rate is good but you can see what is acceptable by looking at the 'properties' of your working songs that are on your MP3 player) ps. To reformat your Music files to the player acceptabel format, you need to download and use a 'Audio Media Converter'.

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1 Answer

MY SANSA WONT SYNC SONGS..


The songs are in the wrong format - they need to be stripped of their DRM license (illegal) or converted to mp3 format.  The best, most legal way to do this is to redownload the songs as an Mp3 file, or re-rip your CD's in Windows Media Player in Mp3 format.
these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 12, 2008 | SanDisk Sansa e260 MP3 Player

1 Answer

Transferring Audio Filles


The songs are perhaps in the wrong format.  This player will not accept copy-protected iTunes (AAC) files.  Also, the license on your files may not permit transfer to mp3 players. Definitely check the bitrates on your files, b/c this Sony can only accept certain ranges of bit rate.
This is my general spiel about music formats, but note that your Sony does accept DRM-protected files with transfer rights, so not everything in the following blurb applies fully to you: All of these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.
-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 09, 2008 | Sony NWZ-S615F Walkman Video MP3 Player

1 Answer

Rca junk


When RCA first came out with the Lyra series the only way to get music onto the device was by using musicmatch jukebox that would convert your mp3 file to mpy before downloading it to the device. But now RCA has come out with a new firm ware update for these mp3 players that improved the players playback quality plus enabled it to use .WMA files. so first go to RCA support http://support.rcaaudiovideo.com/select.aspx?u=downloads and find your player and download the firmware upgrade and install to your player its very easy and instructions are at the same site. You can now convert your music to .wma or use the free Real player that will convert mp3 to wma at the kbps that you request before loading it on. If your music is all ready in wma format you can use windows media player to send the files to your player. One last thing the .wma files that you put on your Lyra player need to be at least 128kbps or higher enhanced playback quality of wma files (160 kbps to 256 kbps).

Jan 15, 2008 | RCA Lyra RD1080 MP3 Player

1 Answer

Keeps restting itself


Firstly, try "re-setting" the Z5 (ie micro switch) first. If this doesn't resolve, then firstly save a backup of all your files...then use the 'format' function (ie open My Computer, then open the YP-Z5 folder, then look for the Format function), which will clean out your entire memory, including hidden files. Then download the latest firmware update from Samsung website (download centre/mp3) and save newest firmware onto your Z5. Always update your Z5 with latest firmware (appropriate with your Windows OS). Good luck.

Mar 06, 2007 | Samsung Yepp YP-Z5QB MP3 Player

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