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Motorcraft alternator to regulator

Took off alterator regulator in side . want to put on alter- with out side regualator. alter- has a tbattery terminal im ok with that &stator terminal not sure where this goes on regulator has field post im ok with that. putting all this on a new holland skid loader . its a 1979 ford alternator ®ulator has 3- post bat-&gen-&field . & need to know what wires go to switch for charging batt.                  thank you mike

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Lyle Siemens

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Here is a generic wiring diagram that should work
motorcraft alternator to regulator - 197523a.jpg

Posted on Oct 30, 2007

  • Victor Hugo Leon Cevallos

    UN SALUDO MI NOMBRE ES vICTOR HUGO, ES DE GRAN AYUDA NO SE SI PUEDO PREGNTAR, MI VEHICULO FORD SLO TIENE EL REGULADOR ELECTRONICO, NO TIENE EL SELENOIDE, ES CORRECTO QUE FUNCINA BIEN O NO , GRACIAS

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83 olds car doors,will not close on one side,the other won't open or close


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2004 Ultra classic won't charge battery


Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness connector terminal and a known good ground and/or the main fuse terminal end of the wire and a known good ground. If there is any continuity the wire is shorted to ground and the short circuit must be found and repaired or the wire must be completely replaced. If there is no such continuity then the regulator DC supply terminal (with the DC side of the regulator connector disconnected) must be tested by putting one lead of an ohmmeter on the regulator terminal and the other on a known good ground. If there is continuity the regulator is shorted to ground and must be replaced. If there is a short in the wiring it is unlikely BUT the regulator could ALSO be internally shorted so it should also be checked either before or after any wiring short is located and repaired.

The voltage regulator must also properly regulate the rectified DC voltage supplied to the battery so that it is not less than 13 VDC or more than 15.5 VDC. If the regulator is not properly limiting supply voltage to the battery to 15.5 VDC or less it will be overcharging the battery. This can be tested for by operating the motorcycle engine at 3000 rpm while placing a voltmeter between the battery positive and negative posts and reading the supplied voltage. If the reading is greater than 15.5 VDC the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the voltage is less than 15.5 VDC but more than 13 VDC the regulator and the rest of the charging system are operating correctly. If the supplied voltage is less than 13 VDC the AC side of the system must be tested and if the AC side is good but the supplied voltage at the battery is less than 13 VDC then the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the AC side of the system is not providing correct AC supply then the stator must be tested and if it is bad, replaced and if it is good then the rotor inspected (cannot be electrically tested as it consists of permanent magnets but it could be inspected fro physical damage and roughly tested for strong magnetic force fields by using a ferrous metal object to see if the attraction of the magnets is strong or weak, but this is basically a better guess rather than a precise measurement). The rotor can also be physically inspected for physical signs of damage including signs of the center hole having become oval AND the stator bolts inspected for possibly having come loose and into contact with the rotor.


AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20 VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

Apr 28, 2014 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

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I have a 2002 VRSCA. I have put a new battery in my bike the last two years. If I put it on the trickle it'll start up a few times, however if I leave it off the bike will not start again. I took it for...


cant test the regulator.....test the alternator...stator and roter make up the alternater...cant test the roter...its a magnet......test stator by unplugging it and put a test lead in 2 of the 3 conector terminals and then rotate 2 more times to test all...1-2,,,,1-3,,,,,2,3.......should get about 40 VAC...volts ac.....i bet one test will be low....below 20....replace stator...if test is good.....now do the same test but use ground instead of one of the lead terminals...check with ohms/resistance.....as long as all readings are OL...replace regulator...

Apr 10, 2014 | 2002 Harley Davidson FXDWG Dyna Wide Glide

1 Answer

How do you know if a reg/rec has gone


Hi, Derek before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Regulator Rectifier Motorbike testing blown or not mp4
Triumph Daytona 600 Regulator Rectifier upgrade
Triumph 2003 Daytona 600 Service Manual
http://www.bikebandit.com/oem-parts/2005-triumph-daytona-600-650-sump/o/m17663sch569813
Triumph DAYTONA 650 Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e



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1 Answer

Fuel gauge constantly reads full


Check connections from the sensor to the gauge if ok measure resistance across the sensor terminals while altering the sensors float height (either remove it or move float with long screwdriver or suchlike ) The resistance should alter when the float is moved if not replace it
Ride Safe Bike-Doc

May 05, 2011 | 2003 Aprilia Atlantic 125

1 Answer

Honda 2004 Sabre will not charge the battery


Hi, Rhall20448 before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Why won my battery hold charge
Honda Shadow VT1100C Charging System Repair
Honda shadow vt1100 Owners Workshop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT1100C2 Owner Manual Page 3

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e


Jul 27, 2010 | 2004 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre

1 Answer

Starts ok .But on the road jerks .it is a new coil.stil the same.fuel line all checked ok.side stand switch ok. "hesitate" or seems to misfire - making the bike ****, sometimes hardly noticable.baffles...


Check for water in the carb
But it may just be the alteration you've made to fuelling
did it start when the exhaust was altered,
if so you know what to do.
Ride Safe
Bike-doc

Please mark this as useful (if it has been!!)

Aug 03, 2009 | 2002 Hyosung GV 250 Aquila

1 Answer

Alternator not charging batt.


inspect cables, they break down over time, corrode and turn green inside

Nov 25, 2008 | 1988 Lincoln Continental

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