Question about Canon 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III USM EF Lens

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Aperture problem My kit lens aperture wont go any larger,it goes smaller and the lens error.On the camera it says 3.5(exmple) but the lens aperture is like on 22 or more.I can't shoot photos.Some says it is from the wire inside the lens.Is it true?

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MIke

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There are several things it could be. Send it in for service is your best bet.

Posted on Nov 24, 2009

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Error message


Turn the aperture ring on the lens to its smallest setting (largest f/number). You can control the aperture from the camera body, the same way as with a lens without an aperture ring.

The aperture ring is the one with a bunch of numbers on it such as 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, and 22.

Jan 16, 2014 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Why the "f" number in manual mode, doesn't go to under the 5.6 ?


f/5.6 is the maximum aperture for the 18-55mm lens zoomed in to 55mm. If you zoom out to 18mm you'll be able to open the aperture to f/3.5.

The maximum aperture is a matter of physics. The larger the aperture (smaller f/numbers) the larger the lens has to be. In theory you could make a 55mm lens with a maximum aperture of f/0.5, but it would have to be more than four inches across on the inside. Lens designers have to balance cost and size with performance.

If you really need a faster lens you can get something like this, but it'll cost you a bundle, about six times as much as your 18-55mm.

Jun 18, 2012 | Canon EOS Digital Rebel XS / 1000D IS...

1 Answer

Hello,the numbers 22 16 11 and so on wont work.but 22 will and it keps on sayin f EE HELP AND I JUST PUT NEW BATTERIES IN AND IT HAS THE BATTERY SYMBOL


Turn the aperture ring to f/22 and if the lens has a lock, lock it. You control the aperture from the camera body, the same as on a lens without an aperture ring.

Sep 13, 2011 | Nikon N55 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I would like to set at the largest aperture. I have an aperture of 5.6 but I know I can get a larger aperture can you tell me how? thanks


The aperture can't be larger than the number printed on the lens. For example, if your lens says it's an 1:3.8 - 5.6, then the aperture can't be larger than f3.8. Since your lens is a zoom lens, it can only open that far at the 18mm setting. The farther you zoom out, the smaller the aperture will get.

Feb 16, 2011 | Canon EOS Digital Rebel XS / 1000D IS...

2 Answers

I changed lens to a 50mmf.1.8 d and the camera wont let me take photos with it in autofocus mode. i get an F-- error.


This can be cause by invalid contact point between the lens and the body of the camera
You can try these simple troubleshooting steps:
  • It usually resolves immediately if I give a slight twist on the barrel, worst case scenario I unseat and re-seat the lens.
  • Turning the camera off and on often fixes the problem
This small metal contact should be responsible for "ground" contact with the camera frame on a lens with plastic mount:bourngenius_10.jpg
Keep this clean and it should limit the error

Jan 04, 2011 | Nikon D7000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Why won't my aperture go lower than 5.6?


You do have total control, within the constraints of the hardware. The 18-55mm lens has a maximum aperture range of f/3.5 to f/5.6. This means that at 55mm the maximum aperture is f/5.6. You can go the other way, all the way to f/38. At shorter focal lengths you can open up as far as f/3.5.

If you want a larger aperture, you'll have to get a faster lens. For example, Nikon has a 17-55mm f/2.8 lens which has a maximum aperture of f/2.8 at all focal lengths. It also costs $1300 new.

Feb 19, 2010 | Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I HAVE THE SAME PROBLEM.


If you're using the kit lens (17-85mm f/4-5.6), the maximum aperture achieveable when fully zoomed out (wide) is f/4 and when fully zoomed in, f/5.6 (that's what the f/4-5.6 stands for). The minimum aperture on this lens is not a problem since you're only making it smaller. i.e., f/22.

Try zooming back and turning the Aperture adjustment dial. You should be able to get f/4.

If you need bigger aperture to get a nice bokeh or to take portraits where the background is blurred while the subject in focus (aka shallow Depth of Field), try lens that are f/3.5 or f/2.8 max. The Canon 50mm f/1.8 is quite affordable (around US$100-120).

Sep 17, 2009 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon 50mm 1.8 lens error message


Hello,
The 50mm lens is fairly old and uses a different system to the later lenses. On the D90 and other later cameras you should rotate the ring to 22 and lock it there using the lock just above the aperture ring.
To adjust the aperture you use the front dial by the on/of switch.

Try it out in A mode. Rotate the mode dial on the top left of the camera to A (Aperture Priority mode) then lightly press the shutter button to turn the meter on. Then rotate the front dial and you will see the aperture reading changing.

The older Nikons changed their apertures using the ring but the later Nikons use the camera controls.

Jun 25, 2009 | Nikon Normal AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D...

5 Answers

Blue tint when shooting aperture priority


Hello, First of all let's explain what aperture priority does in terms of electronics and mechanical/optical changes in the way the camera takes photos. Unlike most point and shot digital cameras, your one has variable aperture range. Aperture is related to your camera lens. Their main function will be to collect light and direct it to the camera's sensor. The aperture of a lens is the diameter of the lens opening and is usually controlled by an iris.The larger the diameter of the aperture, the more light reaches the image sensor. Aperture is expressed as "F-stop", for example F2.8 or f/2.8. The smaller the F-stop number (or f/value) the larger the lens opening (aperture). This means that when you're using aperture priority or large aperture values (a smaller f/value) your image sensor (ccd or cmos) will tend to receive more light or slightly overexpose itself. Most simple digital cameras, the point and shot ones, have a fixed aperture, the lens are fixed and that's set to a so believed "optimum" range in order to produce best pictures when using automatic settings. SLR or semi SLR digital camera's woun't achieve best performances when using them on automatic settings, they aren't designed in the same way as the simple camera's. These camera's will tend to either overexpose, or have lighting/colour problems or achieve blurry images when using automatic settings. Any SLR or semi SLR camera user will be required to understand the way photography (electronic photography) works in order to achieve the best performances with it's camera. For your example, I guess the shots have a blue tint on them when you're using natural sun light in your photos, or in room pictures are illuminated by natural sun light. This is the first sign of overexpure, and the best way to reduce it and it's efects is to manually set the aperture range. Note that higher values will reduce the light that passes to the sensor, so you will want to experiment a little with those in order to achieve the best performance. When you take photos in light environments, bright sunny days or in rooms that contain many white surfaces or walls (these reflect the light pretty much and can overexpose the camera even if it doesn't look that bright when you look at them with your own eyes) you may want to use larger aperture value in order to have little light come to the sensor. Look for the highest values in aperture (in your menu) for example F8 or F16. If the pictures come out to dark or miss some details, you may want to use larger apertures (smaller numbers). Try these tests in order to check if your camera's problem can be solved this way. If not please reply back and we will look on the hardware - firmware side of the problem. Regarding aperture a quick recap :) A large aperture allows more light to reach the sensor. It's good when taking portret pictures and also achieves that nice blurry background surrounding your main subject in the picture. It's defined by smaller numbers (for example F1.8 or F1.2 or smaller). A small aperture allows little light to reach the sensor. It's good to take pictures in bright sun light. It's defined by larger numers (for example F16 or F22 or larger). Hope this helps, Bogdan.

Jul 01, 2007 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

I had the lens mounted


The FEE display means that your lens aperture ring is not set to the F/22 or F/32 ( whichever is at the end of the rotation ). Mount the lens on the camera, then rotate the aperture ring all the way toward the highest number ( 22 or 32 ). If your lens has no aperture ring, the post on the body at the 8 o'clock position of the lens mount is probably broken. It has to be replaced by a repair shop.

Nov 20, 2006 | Nikon F65 35mm SLR Camera

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