Question about M-Audio Delta 1010LT Sound Sound Card

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Problem with MixerInputs

I use my 1010 to record my drums, and I have the snare and the bass drum mics in the 2 XLRinputs. When I use the Maudio Monitor mixer, I try to lower the Input fadder, os that the recorded audio wont clipp. But even as I drag the fadder to the bottom, there is no change on the meter. it still shows a soundlevel which that peaks everytime i hit a snare or bass. How do I solve this?

Posted by RickBjelk on

  • RickBjelk Sep 19, 2007

    Is this the only way to lower the gain? I havent changed the Jumpersetup, and the manual says that the default setting is for low gain, the non phantom power one.

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1 Answer

Anonymous

I have pretty much the same setup, as in snare and bass into the xlrs. You can change the physical jumper positions on the sound card, to give you a lower gain, as in mic/line (details in the manual) This lowers the input gain. Unfortunately, this can sometimes be too low. It's one or the other.

Posted on Sep 18, 2007

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Tip

Home Studio Recording: Part 3


Once again, we dive into the subject of recording your band's (or your solo) album. So far, we've covered the basics, and how to record drums. Today, we talk about the all-important Bass Guitar.

There are a few different ways that you can do this, one being the industry studio standard of using a Direct In box, or DI. How this works is you run through this box, which then has two cables. One to the mixer, and one to your amp. You then mic the amp (see below for mic placement), and get both the clean and amped signals together on the track, giving you a fuller sound.

Method number 2 - Amp your bass, and add the effects there at the amp. Compression, chorus, and distortion are some popular ones with the bass guitar these days, even in country music. Light overdrive gives a bass more high end sparkle, making it easier to hear it at the lower volumes.

Method number 3, and suggested if you don't have a DI box as well as if you don't want to anger your neighbors, who bang on the ceiling with a broom (just joking on that. Still, don't tick them off!) - Plug your bass straight into the computer, and record two tracks simultaneously. On one of the tracks, apply an amp simulator with the desired effects. On the other, apply ONLY an equalizer and compressor, in that order. What this does is gives you the amp tone, as well as accentuates the lower frequencies of the bass guitar. It's the shortcut that actually produces great results.

For mic placement on your amp, you can use either a condenser mic (which requires a preamp, or a mixer with phantom power), or a dynamic mic. Both will give you a great sound, but it's up to you to find what fits your sound, and your budget.
Placing the mic. - Pick your best sounding speaker. To do this, turn your amp down, and play a note. Go to it, and listen to each speaker by placing your ear directly in front of it (this is why we said turn it down). If your best one is close to the floor, rotate the cab so that it's one of the top speakers. Using a standard mic stand, place the mic so that it's pointed directly at the speaker, but it's about 2 inches in front of the cone, and 2 inches to the side. You can experiment with different placements, such as directly in front, or to the side and pointed across the speaker, but this is usually the best sound you'll get.

That's all for this segment of Home Studio Recording. Join us later for part 4.

on Mar 27, 2011 | Music

Tip

Studio Recording at Home; Part Deux


This tip, continuing the series of Home Studio Recording, focuses on the hardest part of accomplishing this feat: Drums.

A big sound killer on 'budget' recordings is poorly recorded drums. There is a remedy, though. If you have one set of drum mics, buy another (or borrow. This will come into play later, though).

If you have clips that hold them on the drums, great. With the two sets, you'll only use half of the clips. For the rest of the mics, you'll want stands. You'll need one stand for each drum, plus six.

The dual mics serve this purpose: To capture the sound of the whole drum. One mic for the batter head (the side you hit), and one for the resonator (the side you don't).

For the batter head, you'll use the mic clips, and attach the mics as you normally would during playing. For the resonator head, use the stands to position the mic directly across the drum, making a straight line from the top of the drum to the bottom. This will help eliminate any voicing differences, which can be a real headache.

For the bass drum, you'll need 2 stands. Position the batter head mic close to the edge of the head on whatever side is easiest to access, but is also comfortable for your playing style.

Aim the mic so that it is pointed at a midway point between the center of the head and the edge. You can experiment with different spots, but be sure to NEVER let the mic be directly in front of the head.
For the bass resonator head (the front one that everybody sees), position the mic so that it is a mirror image of the batter mic. Once again, this gets rid of voicing problems.

You have just miked your drum kit, but what about cymbals? That's where the other 4 mics and stands come into play. Those 4 will take care of:

Hi-hats

Ride

Overheads

For the hi-hats, you'll want to position the mic about 3-5 inches from the top, and 2-4 inches from the side. It's best to come in from the outside of the kit, so that you'll pick up a bit of ambiance (the rest of the kit, as well as some natural reverb). Point the mic at a point close to midway between the bell and edge of the hats. Too close to the edge, and you'll get a sound similar to banging trash can lids together. Too close to the bell, and there's too much high-mid noise that CANNOT be reduced with an EQ.

For the ride, follow the same instructions for the hi-hats, but add about 2 inches to the distances. Aim the mic a little closer to the center as well, so that the mic will pick up any bell hits. A good spot is 1/4 the distance between the bell and edge.

Now for overheads. These are the mics that not only record the cymbals, but pick up the most ambiance.

NOTICE: I haven't already mentioned it, but you do NOT want to record with the drum kit up against a wall, nor do you want it in the center of the room. For best results, use the midway rule (as with placing mics on drums and cymbals, place the kit midway between the center of the room and the edge, preferably headed towards a corner). This will reduce unwanted echoes in the room due to sound reflection.

You will want to place the overheads about 1.5 feet above the highest cymbal. Space them out so that the entire kit is between them, but be sure to keep them evenly spaced. You'll want to use the snare as a midway marker for the placement of overhead mics, since it is your loudest drum, and more likely to be picked up in the overheads than any other drum. This will also keep the snare panned center (you'll be panning the drums out to the left and right later on the mixer, but the snare and bass stay center).

These are some guidelines for setting up mics for recording drums at home. I hope that helps, and stay tuned for Part Trés of Home Studio Recording.

on Mar 13, 2011 | Music

1 Answer

I am going to buy an electronic keyboard for my kids, maybe with a drum set etc too. Are there any makes that people can recommend that I look for?


I always buy Yamaha or Casio when it comes to electronic keyboards for kids. I think their products are well made but also are more affordable than some of the more professionally aimed products.

Feb 25, 2013 | Toys

1 Answer

Every time i hit the bass drum i hear a click along with the bass drum sound...i cant figure out where it is coming from


Unplug all the other triggers and see if it is in the mechanics of the kick mechanism. If not, then one at a time plug in the other triggers till you find one that is causing it. Could even be the bass when amplified is triggerin lightly the rim of the snare for instance.

Sep 17, 2011 | Roland KD7 Drum Controller

1 Answer

You can not play these drums live the spill of the fold back drum fill bin sets of the snare trigger ive turned down the sens on the red box still doesnt work a big waste of money i need to talk to...


With this kit being acoustic-electric, the only advice I can give is to disconnect your snare trigger and mic the snare. It's either that, or your snare trigger is faulty. A new trigger is going to cost about the same as mics, but mics won't hit your snare, making you sound inexperienced. For miking the snare, you'll want to get two mics, placed on the top and bottom head. Try to position them on the same spot on the rim to avoid voicing problems. Studio drummers do the same thing when recording.

For playing this way live, you'll want to use either the main PA, or run to a separate mixer so you can control the volume of the snare in relation to the rest of the kit.

Hope that helps!

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/cameron_463100ffd54b591d

Feb 11, 2011 | Pearl E-Pro Live Electronic Acoustic Drum...

1 Answer

Hi, I would to say thanks a lots to let put some words on yours email box. It's just regarding about how to set up a live band gigs @ outdoor stage in to mixer system. In a mixer setting, i wana know how...


You will need at least a 24 channel mixer to give you spare channels. You also need an active crossover and a snake. The advice you need is too much to include here so I am including some links:http://mixonline.com/live/FixIts/, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_sound_mixing, http://mixinglivesound.com/blog/tag/outdoor-concerts/,http://mixinglivesound.com/blog/, and http://www.scribd.com/doc/11435651/Beginners-Guide-to-Mixing-Sound. You may need more monitors than you are planning on and you might consider in ear monitoring.

Aug 22, 2010 | Music

1 Answer

Seperate tracks


They have to be recorded on SEPERATE tracks if you want to keep them seperate. It will be hard to do this live as if you mic acoustics you will still get some cross feed in the mics from the different percussions.

With an electronic drum set it may be even harder as they often only have a single mixed output.

The way the professionals would do this is to play the kick and record it on a track... and then play that track back and record the snare and hat each seperately on other tracks.

Once you have synced tracks of the parts, then you can mix anyway you want.

With electronic drums you COULD have two seperate modules to give you two seperate outputs, but that is a budget breaker.

Apr 20, 2010 | Roland Mv8800 Production Studio

1 Answer

Can you directly hook a sr16 to a peavey bass speaker cabinet using the output mono on the sr16 to send or retrn on the cabinet?


You can, however a bass speaker cabinet will NOT handle the higher pitch sounds needed for cymbals and snares, etc. You would connect it to the return AND doing so would DISABLE the other inputs of the bass speaker cabinet.

If you want both a guitar and drum machine into the cabinet, you need at least a small mixer or a speaker cabinet that can take two channels input simultaneously.

Plugging into the "return" of the cabinet DISCONNECTS the power amp from the preamp section in the cabinet.

Nov 09, 2009 | Alesis Sr 16 Stereo Drum Machine

1 Answer

SETTING LEVELS ON MY POWER MIXER FOR MICING DRUM SET


Go check out these pictures, and there is some good info about micing up your drums. :) Recording it is then a case of getting levels good for a start by worling your way around the kit one drum at a time setting the level for that drum. a bit of nice reverb in the mix and out come you drums.... whoooohhooooo

May 12, 2008 | Samson SX1200 Amplifier

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