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I am using an mgear sustain pedal for my yamaha keyboard. The pedal usually works, though sometimes I have to flip the switch on the bottom of it, for whatever reason, to get it to actually sustain. But when I tried using it today, sometimes it chooses to sustain notes and sometimes it doesn't. Any guesses to what might be causing the problem?

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Jerry LaRosa

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  • 17 Answers

Since you didn't specify the model of the Yamaha I will take a good guess. MOST keyboards of all types default via their internal programming to use a pedal that is either a close circuit or open circuit switch. Basically it is two contacts from a wire that is connected (closed) or normally not connected (Open). When you press a pedal, the contacts either open or close. Your pedal has a switch that can choose either one. Now,.. the keyboard has some internal software that controls how the keyboard "sees" the pedal. It sounds to me that you have to get into the "control" section of the interface on the Yamaha and scroll to the "Pedal" polarity section. You might see it as a - (minus) or a + (plus) icon. See if you can make
one of them a default every time you power up. You see, every time you power up the keyboard, it is sensing something different. One last thought... or question...are you keeping the sustain pedal plugged in? or are you connecting and reconnecting it? The keyboard usually "remembers" or senses the polarity from the last power up. I have had similar issues with the Motif keyboards from Yamaha, but have remedied the issue by digging into the internal controls. Lastly, search the manual that came with your Yamaha. See if there is a section under Pedal or pedal polarity.

Posted on Oct 25, 2017

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5 Related Answers

Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Sustain pedal not working on my Yamaha P-90

What I figured out is that when i turn on the keyboard, if i hold down the pedal by accident, it will work in reverse. I dont know if this is what you mean. If it is, just dont touch the pedal when you turn it on. If it isn't, try to return the pedal. I dropped one, it had this problem, and they gave me a new one. Your cord for it might have been bent (?). Also, turn the keyboard on with the pedal already plugged in. It's not made to be plugged in while it's on. Hope this helps. - Matthew

Posted on May 15, 2009

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SOURCE: My sustain pedal does not work on my Roland Juno-D keyboard.

Have you tried the pedal straight into the amp without going thru the Roland?

Does the sustain pedal turn on with the foot pedal or is it a separte stomp switch to turn it on?

Posted on Jun 01, 2009

Anonymous

  • 4 Answers

SOURCE: Roland DP-2 pedal not functioning correctly.

There are two types of damper pedal switches, on that is closed until you press it, and one that closes when your press it. It sounds like your Casio is expecting one type and your Roland pedal is the other type. A quick way to test this is to plug a guitar cable into the Casio pedal input and see if the keyboard sustains. If it does, then your Casio requires an "normally closed" switch.

Some pedals have a small switch near the cord or even on the bottom of the pedal that will reverse the switching operation (BOSS pedals, a division of Roland, have this feature). If you can find that, then change the switch position and you should be OK.

If not, and you feel like digging into your pedal, you could take the bottom off of the pedal and check out the switch itself. Many pedals use a switch that can be used either way. The clue will be on the switch itself. If there is an extra tab on the switch that is unused, then switch the wire that is furthest away from that tab to that tab. This will probably involve soldering, but it is nearly impossible to damage anything.
If moving the wire that is furthest away does not do anything, then try putting that wire back and switching the other one.

If your pedal does NOT have an extra tab, you're SOL, unless you want to buy a replacement switch (unsure of make). If this is the case, you are probably better off getting a different damper pedal - preferably one that is marketed as "universal"

Posted on Jul 02, 2009

Michial Gueffroy

  • 1140 Answers

SOURCE: Ensoniq KT-88 - sustain pedal works opposite the way it should

Usually that indicates that the polarity of the jack for the sustain pedal has been switched or someone has substituted another pedal with the wrong polarity. Try looking in the manual to see if that is an editable parameter for people who might not be able to obtain an original pedal. You may have to initialize the keyboard which is on page viii of the manual. The jacks on the back for footswitches are on page 1 and 2. The footswitch settings are on page 9. I found the manual here:http://soundprogramming.net/manuals/Ensoniq_KT-76_KT-88_Manual.pdf I don't know if you have the single footswitch or the optional stereo footswitch. If it is the single footswitch, the default setting should work correctly if it is the original SW-2 or SW-6 pedal switches. If it is the optional SW-10, the FTswL setting should be Unused. Hope this helps.

Posted on Aug 17, 2009

Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Sustain pedal on Yamaha DGX not working

Hi, I had the same problem, but I have an easy solution. I am trying to connect an FC5 to a Casio CTK-3000. The problem is open vs closed circuit in the pedal and the way that the casio interprets the info. Paulll's fix is correct, but you do not have to use soldering. Simply remove the cover, unscrew the silver screw, and you will notice that the black contraption that holds the two metal strips has one side that pops off. Pop off this side.
Now, notice that the short strip is on top and the long strip is on the bottom. The way the strips bend mean that the circuit is closed when there is no pressure on the pedal. When you press the pedal, the white knob on the long strip pushes the long strip down and breaks the connection with the short strip.
What you need to do now is remove the two strips and slide them back into the black contraption with the long strip on top and the short strip on the bottom. The white knob on the long strip should be facing up. Make sure when you do this that you hook the short strip over that little horizontal black plastic rod so that it will easily contact the long strip when the long strip is pressed down.
By bending the top (long) strip a little, you can make it so that the long strip does not touch the bottom (short) strip in the relaxed position. Make sure that the ends of the strips where the wires join do not touch each other either. You now have an open circuit in the relaxed position, which is what Casio recognizes as NO PEDAL.
Pop the side piece back on the black contraption and screw the black contraption back in place with the silver screw. Set the spring back in place and reattach the 'pedal'. Make sure that there is enough clearance between the top of the white knob and the inside of the pedal so that the circuit remains open in the relaxed position.
Now, if the two strips are NOT touching each other, when you plug it into your Casio, the Casio will not recognize the pedal, which is good. When you push on the pedal, you will close the circuit and the Casio will recognize the pedal.
If you push on the pedal and nothing happens, then the two strips are not contacting each other in the fully pressed position. Take the unit apart and try again.
If the Casio still recognizes the pedal even though you are not pushing on it, then the two strips are contacting each other at any place along their length. Take the unit apart and try again.
Enjoy your new working pedal!
Greg
PS. If you Casio won't work with your computer, there is a fix out there for that too. It involves removing (or renaming) some files that Logitech loads on to your computer when you install a webcam. Weird, but true.

Posted on Jan 27, 2010

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What I figured out is that when i turn on the keyboard, if i hold down the pedal by accident, it will work in reverse. I dont know if this is what you mean. If it is, just dont touch the pedal when you turn it on. If it isn't, try to return the pedal. I dropped one, it had this problem, and they gave me a new one. Your cord for it might have been bent (?). Also, turn the keyboard on with the pedal already plugged in. It's not made to be plugged in while it's on. Hope this helps. - Matthew

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