Question about Janome Memory Craft 9000 Computerized Sewing Machine

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White thread keeps pulling through

When i am doing some automatic embriodery the white bobbin thread will pull large amounts through the the front of the fabric being stitched, resulting in a ruined design. I have lost the mannual unfortunatly as the machine was second hand when i got it. It has only been recently that the white thread has been coming through. The Machine sews fine when not using a memory card. Please help me! Thanks tpjones

Posted by tpjones on

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Anonymous

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Manual for Janome 9000 is available from the Janome site. http://www.janome.com/documents/File/ManualFile/inst%20book%20MC9000.pdf

Posted on Sep 23, 2007

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2 Answers

Stitches to loose


You need to tighten the bottom and top stitches both. First, tighten the bobbin slightly. Now, tighten the top stitches the same amount of pressure as the bobbin. The attempt is to have both the bottom and top stitches exactly the same so the final stitch ends up in the center of the fabric. Observe the stitch and readjust if necessary.

Oct 08, 2017 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Adjusting the stitches on White sewing machine 425


Adjusting stitches how? Are the stitches too short, too long, is the tension off, are there loops of thread accumulating (bird nests), thread pulls out of the fabric, is the top thread not picking up the bobbin thread????

Mar 10, 2017 | White Sewing Sewing Machines

1 Answer

My stitch length is tiny and will not change


When selecting a stich, there's a button with a triangle with one edge pointing down. There you can select Needle Position and Stitch Length. --PDF manual, page 23

The thread tension has no influence on the stitch length. It just adjusts, where needle thread and bobbin thread 'meet' inside the fabric. A too high tension means, the bobbin thread is pulled trough the fabric and can be seen on the upper (needle) side. A too low tension means, the bobbin thread is not pulled through the fabric and you can see the needle thread on the bobbin side.

Jul 08, 2014 | Janome Memory Craft 9000 Computerized...

1 Answer

Thread tension will not adjust.


Check your setting, you have your stitches set too far apart. Wherever on your machine you see the zigzag stich you will see other stich settings, look at it until you see the right amount of stiches you want.

Mar 06, 2017 | Brother CE8080PRW Limited Edition Project...

1 Answer

White sewing machine 2037 I have been having trouble for some time with the bobbin thread becoming snarled. Finally took it apart and cleaned it, which helped. When I sat down to sew a blanket tonight,...


Hello. What you have described presents a large number of possibilities. What I can tell you is this; A sewing machine that uses a bobbin is known as a lock stitch sewing machine. On a basic lock stitch machine, two threads are used to make the stitch - the needle thread and the bobbin thread. In order for the stitch to be made, the bobbin and it's thread are passed through a loop in the needle thread, or more accurately, the needle thread must pass a loop around the bobbin and it's thread, after which the loop is pulled back in and up, taking the bobbin thread with it right up to the underside of the fabric and securely holding it there and the process is repeated, many times over in the blink of an eye. The bobbin, weather placed in a case first or or set directly into, has a place in the center of a rotating hook, which can be oriented in either a vertical or horizontal position. It is the sharp, pointy hook that grabs the needle thread above the eye of the needle and loops the needle thread around the bobbin and it's thread. In less than one full rotation of the hook the needle thread is picked up, looped around the bobbin, and pulled back off of the hook, taking with it the bobbin thread and pulling it up tight to the bottom of the fabric. The process is then repeated, many times over in the blink of an eye. For a sewing machine to function correctly, every aspect of the process must be right, and if any part of the process is not spot-on, failure occurs. Process failure ranges in severity from one stitch out of a thousand skipped to catastrophic breakage of the machine and it's parts. I'm sorry I don't know of a White repair shop in your area. I am new to FixYa, so I'm not sure if it is appropriate to offer my services, but I think it is okay to give you my number if you want to call me. It is 574-808-9613.

Aug 18, 2011 | White Sewing 2037 Mechanical Sewing...

1 Answer

How do i thread my needle with the singer handy stitch?


  1. Loosen needle screw & insert needle with shank's flat side facing front of machine. Push needle in all the way, then tighten screw to hold needle in place.
  2. Install a fully wound bobbin by loosening bobbin nut & placing bobbin on top. Re-attach bobbin nut & tighten. If standard thread spool will be used, then attach spool pin to bobbin shaft & place thread spool onto shaft. Attach white spool cap on end of thread spool, then tighten. Bobbin/spool should unwind facing forward toward needle.
  3. Bring end of thread through thread guides & over tension control. Pass end of thread through needle eye, from back to front, & pull it out about two inches.
  4. A spring pushes pressor foot onto fabric that is being sewn, so lift pressor foot & place fabric underneath.
  5. Turn large handwheel on side of machine (handwheel can be turned in either direction) to raise needle arm to its highest position.
  6. Holding the Handy Stitch in place with your right hand, press on power switch & begin sewing. Guide fabric (being sewn) with your left hand.
  7. To end this sewing session, turn off power. Turn handwheel to raise needle to its highest position. Carefully pull out about three inches of thread through needle & snip, then lift pressor foot to remove fabric. Turn fabric over & loop needle threader through last stitch. Place end of thread from underside through eye of needle threader, & pull to loop through. Pull to tighten and snip end of thread.

Nov 11, 2010 | As Seen On TV Handy Stitch Mechanical...

1 Answer

Hi, my problem is my bobbin. The tension is fine, it is when I put the bobbin into the bobbin holder. When I thread it through the plate with the top thread, it is so hard to pull out. It seems really...


TENSION: As you change projects and start sewing on different weight materials, you should test stitch on a piece of scrap material of the same weight before beginning the actual project so you can adjust your upper tension to that particular fabric. As an example, if you're changing from a denim type fabric to a silky fabric, you would definitely want to make sure the tension is correct and the stitching looks right before you start to sew the garment.

To determine whether the upper tension is too tight or too loose for the fabric you're wanting to use, try the following test. Take a small scrap of the fabric, fold it, and stitch a line ON THE BIAS of the fabric, using different colors of thread in the bobbin and on top. Grasp the bias line of stitching between the thumb and the index finger. Space the hands about 3 inches apart and pull with an even, quick force until one thread breaks. If the broken thread is the color of the thread in the needle, it means that the upper tension is too tight. If the broken thread is the color of the bobbin thread, the upper tension is too loose. If both threads break together and take more force to break, it means that the tensions are balanced.

BOBBIN: The most probable cause of the lower thread breaking is an improperly wound bobbin. Regardless of where you wind the bobbin, inside the machine, on the top of the handwheel or on the front side near the hand wheel, the basic "bobbin" rules apply.

** Always start with an empty bobbin. Never wind one color over another color.
** Don't wind the bobbin so full that it would be tight and hard to insert into the bobbin case. Most machines have an automatic "shut off" when the bobbin gets full, but if yours does not, be careful not to fill it too full.
** Wind the bobbin evenly across and in level layers.
** Never mix different sizes of thread in the bobbin and on the spool, unless you're doing sewing machine embroidery or some specialty type of sewing. Using different weights of thread on the spool and in the bobbin for general sewing will cause ragged stitches as well as other stitching problems.

NEEDLE: Probably 25% of machine repair jobs I go out on, the only problem was that the needle was put in backwards. I know you're probably saying "I've been sewing most of my life and I know how to put the needle in the machine"; however many times a seamstress will get in a hurry and not give the needle a second thought when putting a new one in the machine. If your machine will not pick up the bottom thread or skips stitches badly, in most cases it's because the needle is in wrong.

Each sewing machine requires that the "flat" side of the needle be put in a specific way - facing the front, the back, etc., depending on your particular make and model. If you have a sewing machine that takes a needle that doesn't have a flat side, you'll notice that each needle has a groove in it where the thread lays as it penetrates the fabric. Depending on whether your machine shuttle system faces to the front or to the left, the groove of the needle will also face front or left.

MACHINE THREADING: An additional area to check for stitching problems is whether the sewing machine is threaded properly. Each machine has a certain sequence for threading, and it only takes one missed step in the sequence to cause your machine to skip stitches. If you're in doubt, take the top thread completely out and start all over again.

Jul 05, 2009 | Sewing Machines

2 Answers

Pfaff Expression 3.0 works great in the shop, but when I get it home the bobbin thread doesn't engage with the needle thread. The needle thread ends up making large irregular loops on the bottom of the...


pfaff expression 2.0 works the same. I spend lots of hours with the thread tension and it don;t give me a good stitch. the needle threed ends up making large irregular loops .

Apr 12, 2009 | White Sewing 1521

4 Answers

BOTTOM STITCH IS ALWAYS LOOSE


If the top stitch is loose, then you need to tighten the bobbin tension: if the bottom stitch is loose, tighten the top tension. Hope this helps. It could also be the size needle and thread you are using for a particular fabric. Different fabrics require different notions.

Mar 13, 2008 | Sewing Machines

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