Question about GE JTP85 Electric Double Oven

2 Answers

F4 My oven is not working and its showing F4 on the monitor, it will not let me press any buttons, the heat is no generating. Some say is a shortage, if i is can someone tell me how to fix it?

Posted by luvin2thpick on

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2 Answers

Charlie Popeck

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The F4 error code generally means a bad temperature sensor or a short in leads to the sensor. Under room temperature conditions the resistance should be approximately 1100 ohms. If you are not comfortable around electrical apparatus and/or don't have an ohmmeter, you will need to contact an appliance repair technician. GE typically places a trouble shooting guide in the top of their ovens behind the touchpanel. You will have to remove three screws in the bottom of the touchpanel to open the panel. Be sure and turn off the power before opening the touchpanel!!!

Posted on Aug 24, 2007

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Anonymous

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My double 27" self cleaning built in Model No.911.48489 oven is working and its control first time show F9 on the monitor,later I hear beeep - it is after I change Replacement control Sanyo/Torisan ERC3DD

Posted on Oct 02, 2007

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1 Answer

What does F1 mean on the display panel on my Jenn Air gas oven? It won't allow me to heat up the oven, and the igniter is fine.


F1 code indicates that:
a. The electronic range control (ERC) is sensing heat in the oven when in a time-of-day (i.e., not cooking) mode or
b. The ERC is receiving information to run multiple heat functions simultaneously.

Although different components (depending upon the model) could generate the code, simple and straightforward testing using your ohm meter is all you gotta do to test for it.

1. Check the oven temperature sensor. The oven sensor gotsta be within spec or it will cause the F1 code. As an example of being out-of-spec, the ERC will generate an F1 fault code when the sensor shows 1650 ohms during a time-of-day mode. This is equivalent to 350°F in the oven. The resistance isn't high enough to generate an F2 code (runaway temp) or an F3 or F4 code (shorted/open sensor circuit). The ERC monitors the sensor circuit after a heat cycle and expects the resistance to drop back to 1050-1100 ohms. The fault code is generated when this doesn't happen. Checking the sensor circuit means also checking the harness, harness connections and the sensor itself.

2. If the oven sensor circuit checks okay, then turn your inquisitive eyeballs to the touchpad. If the range has a separate touchpad/keyboard, the keypad may have moisture that is shorting several circuits simultaneously. If the F1 code is given immediately (instead of during or after a heat cycle), remove the ribbon connector from the touchpad to the ERC after clearing the F1 code. If the F1 code does not return in five minutes, then cast a suspicious gaze upon the touchpad/keyboard. Shorts may be caused by using an ammonia-based glass cleaner. The touchpad surface will absorb ammonia-based cleaners that are sprayed directly on the glass surface. When heat is applied, the surface material can break down causing shorts. If you're gonna use ammonia-based cleaners on your control panel, then you should spray it on the rag and then wipe the touchpanel -don't spray directly onto the surface of the touchpad.

3. On Amana ranges with a rotary temperature dial, be sure that the knob is in the OFF position when performing tests.

4. If these tests all check good, then replace the ERC.


Hope this helps.

Jun 03, 2011 | Jenn-Air Ovens

1 Answer

F1 error?


Hi, The F1 code indicates that:


a. The electronic range control (ERC) is sensing heat in the oven when in a time-of-day (i.e., not cooking) mode.

b. The ERC is receiving information to run multiple heat functions simultaneously.


Although different components (depending upon the model) could generate the code, simple and straightforward testing using your ohm meter is all you gotta do to test for it.

1. Check the oven temperature sensor. The oven sensor has to be within spec or it will cause the F1 code.
As an example of being out-of-spec, the ERC will generate an F1 fault code when the sensor shows 1650 ohms during a time-of-day mode.
This is equivalent to 350°F in the oven.
The resistance isn't high enough to generate an F2 code (runaway temp) or an F3 or F4 code (shorted/open sensor circuit).
The ERC monitors the sensor circuit after a heat cycle and expects the resistance to drop back to 1050-1100 ohms.
The fault code is generated when this doesn't happen. Checking the sensor circuit means also checking the harness,
harness connections and the sensor itself.

2. If the oven sensor circuit checks okay, then turn your inquisitive eyeballs to the touchpad.
If the range has a separate touchpad/keyboard, the keypad may have moisture that is shorting several circuits simultaneously.
If the F1 code is given immediately (instead of during or after a heat cycle),
remove the ribbon connector from the touchpad to the ERC after clearing the F1 code. If the F1 code does not return in five minutes,
then cast a suspicious gaze upon the touchpad/keyboard. Shorts may be caused by using an ammonia-based glass cleaner.
The touchpad surface will absorb ammonia-based cleaners that are sprayed directly on the glass surface. When heat is applied,
the surface material can break down causing shorts.
If you're gonna use ammonia-based cleaners on your control panel, then you should spray it on the rag and then wipe the touchpanel
-don't spray directly onto the surface of the touchpad.

3. On Amana ranges with a rotary temperature dial, be sure that the knob is in the OFF position when performing tests.

4. If these tests all check good, then replace the ERC.

Dec 19, 2010 | Maytag CWG3100A Gas Single Oven

1 Answer

I have a maytag range/oven model mgs5770adb and keep getting an F1 code on the display


The F1 code indicates that:

a. The electronic range control (ERC) is sensing heat in the oven when in a time-of-day (1.e., not cooking) mode or

b. The ERC is receiving information to run multiple heat functions simultaneously.

Although different components (depending upon the model) could generate the code, simple and straightforward testing using your ohm meter is all you gotta do to test for it.

1. Check the oven temperature sensor. The oven sensor gotsta be within spec or it will cause the F1 code. As an example of being out-of-spec, the ERC will generate an F1 fault code when the sensor shows 1650 ohms during a time-of-day mode. This is equivalent to 350°F in the oven. The resistance isn't high enough to generate an F2 code (runaway temp) or an F3 or F4 code (shorted/open sensor circuit). The ERC monitors the sensor circuit after a heat cycle and expects the resistance to drop back to 1050-1100 ohms. The fault code is generated when this doesn't happen. Checking the sensor circuit means also checking the harness, harness connections and the sensor itself.

2. If the oven sensor circuit checks okay, then turn your inquisitive eyeballs to the touchpad. If the range has a separate touchpad/keyboard, the keypad may have moisture that is shorting several circuits simultaneously. If the F1 code is given immediately (instead of during or after a heat cycle), remove the ribbon connector from the touchpad to the ERC after clearing the F1 code. If the F1 code does not return in five minutes, then cast a suspicious gaze upon the touchpad/keyboard. Shorts may be caused by using an ammonia-based glass cleaner. The touchpad surface will absorb ammonia-based cleaners that are sprayed directly on the glass surface. When heat is applied, the surface material can break down causing shorts. If you're gonna use ammonia-based cleaners on your control panel, then you should spray it on the rag and then wipe the touchpanel -don't spray directly onto the surface of the touchpad.

3. If these tests all check good, then replace the ERC.

Sep 23, 2010 | Maytag Ovens

1 Answer

The digital panel is displaying -F1- and will not


Here is some wisdom for understanding F1 fault codes.

In some models, there are subcodes that make diagnosis even easier.

Here's a simple explanation of what's going on and how to troubleshoot:

The F1 code indicates that:


a. The electronic range control (ERC) is sensing heat in the oven when in a time-of-day (i.e., not cooking) mode.

b. The ERC is receiving information to run multiple heat functions simultaneously.


Although different components (depending upon the model) could generate the code, simple and straightforward testing using your ohm meter is all you gotta do to test for it.

1. Check the oven temperature sensor. The oven sensor has to be within spec or it will cause the F1 code.
As an example of being out-of-spec, the ERC will generate an F1 fault code when the sensor shows 1650 ohms during a time-of-day mode.
This is equivalent to 350°F in the oven.
The resistance isn't high enough to generate an F2 code (runaway temp) or an F3 or F4 code (shorted/open sensor circuit).
The ERC monitors the sensor circuit after a heat cycle and expects the resistance to drop back to 1050-1100 ohms.
The fault code is generated when this doesn't happen. Checking the sensor circuit means also checking the harness,
harness connections and the sensor itself.

2. If the oven sensor circuit checks okay, then turn your inquisitive eyeballs to the touchpad.
If the range has a separate touchpad/keyboard, the keypad may have moisture that is shorting several circuits simultaneously.
If the F1 code is given immediately (instead of during or after a heat cycle),
remove the ribbon connector from the touchpad to the ERC after clearing the F1 code. If the F1 code does not return in five minutes,
then cast a suspicious gaze upon the touchpad/keyboard. Shorts may be caused by using an ammonia-based glass cleaner.
The touchpad surface will absorb ammonia-based cleaners that are sprayed directly on the glass surface. When heat is applied,
the surface material can break down causing shorts.
If you're gonna use ammonia-based cleaners on your control panel, then you should spray it on the rag and then wipe the touchpanel
-don't spray directly onto the surface of the touchpad.

3. On Amana ranges with a rotary temperature dial, be sure that the knob is in the OFF position when performing tests.

4. If these tests all check good, then replace the ERC.


Thanks for using FixYa - a 4 THUMBS rating is appreciated for answering your FREE question.

Jun 15, 2010 | Whirlpool 30" Self-Cleaning Freestanding...

2 Answers

The self-cleaning mode will not stop on my Kenmore oven


Here is some wisdom for understanding F1 fault codes.

In some models, there are subcodes that make diagnosis even easier.

Here's a simple explanation of what's going on and how to troubleshoot:

The F1 code indicates that:


a. The electronic range control (ERC) is sensing heat in the oven when in a time-of-day (i.e., not cooking) mode.

b. The ERC is receiving information to run multiple heat functions simultaneously.


Although different components (depending upon the model) could generate the code, simple and straightforward testing using your ohm meter is all you gotta do to test for it.

1. Check the oven temperature sensor. The oven sensor has to be within spec or it will cause the F1 code.
As an example of being out-of-spec, the ERC will generate an F1 fault code when the sensor shows 1650 ohms during a time-of-day mode.
This is equivalent to 350°F in the oven.
The resistance isn't high enough to generate an F2 code (runaway temp) or an F3 or F4 code (shorted/open sensor circuit).
The ERC monitors the sensor circuit after a heat cycle and expects the resistance to drop back to 1050-1100 ohms.
The fault code is generated when this doesn't happen. Checking the sensor circuit means also checking the harness,
harness connections and the sensor itself.

2. If the oven sensor circuit checks okay, then turn your inquisitive eyeballs to the touchpad.
If the range has a separate touchpad/keyboard, the keypad may have moisture that is shorting several circuits simultaneously.
If the F1 code is given immediately (instead of during or after a heat cycle),
remove the ribbon connector from the touchpad to the ERC after clearing the F1 code. If the F1 code does not return in five minutes,
then cast a suspicious gaze upon the touchpad/keyboard. Shorts may be caused by using an ammonia-based glass cleaner.
The touchpad surface will absorb ammonia-based cleaners that are sprayed directly on the glass surface. When heat is applied,
the surface material can break down causing shorts.
If you're gonna use ammonia-based cleaners on your control panel, then you should spray it on the rag and then wipe the touchpanel
-don't spray directly onto the surface of the touchpad.

3. On Amana ranges with a rotary temperature dial, be sure that the knob is in the OFF position when performing tests.

4. If these tests all check good, then replace the ERC.


Thanks for using FixYa - a 4 THUMBS rating is appreciated for answering your FREE question.
&&$%%

Aug 14, 2009 | Kenmore 40494 / 40495 / 40499 Electric...

1 Answer

GE Profile Double Oven F1 Error


Here is some wisdom for understanding F1 fault codes.

In some models, there are subcodes that make diagnosis even easier.

Here's a simple explanation of what's going on and how to troubleshoot:

The F1 code indicates that:


a. The electronic range control (ERC) is sensing heat in the oven when in a time-of-day (i.e., not cooking) mode.

b. The ERC is receiving information to run multiple heat functions simultaneously.


Although different components (depending upon the model) could generate the code, simple and straightforward testing using your ohm meter is all you gotta do to test for it.

1. Check the oven temperature sensor. The oven sensor has to be within spec or it will cause the F1 code.
As an example of being out-of-spec, the ERC will generate an F1 fault code when the sensor shows 1650 ohms during a time-of-day mode.
This is equivalent to 350°F in the oven.
The resistance isn't high enough to generate an F2 code (runaway temp) or an F3 or F4 code (shorted/open sensor circuit).
The ERC monitors the sensor circuit after a heat cycle and expects the resistance to drop back to 1050-1100 ohms.
The fault code is generated when this doesn't happen. Checking the sensor circuit means also checking the harness,
harness connections and the sensor itself.

2. If the oven sensor circuit checks okay, then turn your inquisitive eyeballs to the touchpad.
If the range has a separate touchpad/keyboard, the keypad may have moisture that is shorting several circuits simultaneously.
If the F1 code is given immediately (instead of during or after a heat cycle),
remove the ribbon connector from the touchpad to the ERC after clearing the F1 code. If the F1 code does not return in five minutes,
then cast a suspicious gaze upon the touchpad/keyboard. Shorts may be caused by using an ammonia-based glass cleaner.
The touchpad surface will absorb ammonia-based cleaners that are sprayed directly on the glass surface. When heat is applied,
the surface material can break down causing shorts.
If you're gonna use ammonia-based cleaners on your control panel, then you should spray it on the rag and then wipe the touchpanel
-don't spray directly onto the surface of the touchpad.

3. On Amana ranges with a rotary temperature dial, be sure that the knob is in the OFF position when performing tests.

4. If these tests all check good, then replace the ERC.


Thanks for using FixYa - a 4 THUMBS rating is appreciated for answering your FREE question.
&*&^%rt

Aug 08, 2009 | GE Profile JTP56 Electric Double Oven

1 Answer

Kenmore stove mod.790 9432


Here is some wisdom for understanding F1 fault codes.

In some models, there are subcodes that make diagnosis even easier.

Here's a simple explanation of what's going on and how to troubleshoot:

The F1 code indicates that:


a. The electronic range control (ERC) is sensing heat in the oven when in a time-of-day (i.e., not cooking) mode.

b. The ERC is receiving information to run multiple heat functions simultaneously.


Although different components (depending upon the model) could generate the code, simple and straightforward testing using your ohm meter is all you gotta do to test for it.

1. Check the oven temperature sensor. The oven sensor has to be within spec or it will cause the F1 code.
As an example of being out-of-spec, the ERC will generate an F1 fault code when the sensor shows 1650 ohms during a time-of-day mode.
This is equivalent to 350°F in the oven.
The resistance isn't high enough to generate an F2 code (runaway temp) or an F3 or F4 code (shorted/open sensor circuit).
The ERC monitors the sensor circuit after a heat cycle and expects the resistance to drop back to 1050-1100 ohms.
The fault code is generated when this doesn't happen. Checking the sensor circuit means also checking the harness,
harness connections and the sensor itself.

2. If the oven sensor circuit checks okay, then turn your inquisitive eyeballs to the touchpad.
If the range has a separate touchpad/keyboard, the keypad may have moisture that is shorting several circuits simultaneously.
If the F1 code is given immediately (instead of during or after a heat cycle),
remove the ribbon connector from the touchpad to the ERC after clearing the F1 code. If the F1 code does not return in five minutes,
then cast a suspicious gaze upon the touchpad/keyboard. Shorts may be caused by using an ammonia-based glass cleaner.
The touchpad surface will absorb ammonia-based cleaners that are sprayed directly on the glass surface. When heat is applied,
the surface material can break down causing shorts.
If you're gonna use ammonia-based cleaners on your control panel, then you should spray it on the rag and then wipe the touchpanel
-don't spray directly onto the surface of the touchpad.

3. On Amana ranges with a rotary temperature dial, be sure that the knob is in the OFF position when performing tests.

4. If these tests all check good, then replace the ERC.


Thanks for using FixYa - a 4 THUMBS rating is appreciated for answering your FREE question.
($%^

Mar 29, 2009 | Kenmore 40494 / 40495 / 40499 Electric...

1 Answer

Range control panal flashes F1, oven no longer works.


Here is some wisdom for understanding F1 fault codes.

In some models, there are subcodes that make diagnosis even easier.

Here's a simple explanation of what's going on and how to troubleshoot:

The F1 code indicates that:


a. The electronic range control (ERC) is sensing heat in the oven when in a time-of-day (i.e., not cooking) mode.

b. The ERC is receiving information to run multiple heat functions simultaneously.


Although different components (depending upon the model) could generate the code, simple and straightforward testing using your ohm meter is all you gotta do to test for it.

1. Check the oven temperature sensor. The oven sensor has to be within spec or it will cause the F1 code.
As an example of being out-of-spec, the ERC will generate an F1 fault code when the sensor shows 1650 ohms during a time-of-day mode.
This is equivalent to 350°F in the oven.
The resistance isn't high enough to generate an F2 code (runaway temp) or an F3 or F4 code (shorted/open sensor circuit).
The ERC monitors the sensor circuit after a heat cycle and expects the resistance to drop back to 1050-1100 ohms.
The fault code is generated when this doesn't happen. Checking the sensor circuit means also checking the harness,
harness connections and the sensor itself.

2. If the oven sensor circuit checks okay, then turn your inquisitive eyeballs to the touchpad.
If the range has a separate touchpad/keyboard, the keypad may have moisture that is shorting several circuits simultaneously.
If the F1 code is given immediately (instead of during or after a heat cycle),
remove the ribbon connector from the touchpad to the ERC after clearing the F1 code. If the F1 code does not return in five minutes,
then cast a suspicious gaze upon the touchpad/keyboard. Shorts may be caused by using an ammonia-based glass cleaner.
The touchpad surface will absorb ammonia-based cleaners that are sprayed directly on the glass surface. When heat is applied,
the surface material can break down causing shorts.
If you're gonna use ammonia-based cleaners on your control panel, then you should spray it on the rag and then wipe the touchpanel
-don't spray directly onto the surface of the touchpad.

3. On Amana ranges with a rotary temperature dial, be sure that the knob is in the OFF position when performing tests.

4. If these tests all check good, then replace the ERC.


Thanks for using FixYa - a 4 THUMBS rating is appreciated for answering your FREE question.
$%^TG

Jan 14, 2009 | Frigidaire 30" Self-Cleaning Freestanding...

1 Answer

Kenmore model # 911-494-79790


F0 Defective ERC Replace ERC
F1 Defective ERC Replace ERC
F2 Oven over heat Replace defective Sensor
F3 Oven Sensor Open Check/Replace Sensor
F4 Shorted wire or Sensor locate short and correct it or replace Sensor
F5 Defective ERC Replace ERC
F6 Problem with time keeping circuit Reset Time or cooking operation and check for proper ground.
F7 Shorted or sticking button Clean button or replace ERC
F8 Defective ERC Replace ERC
F9 Door Latch Error Check latch and latch circuit

May 11, 2008 | Kenmore 30169 Electric Single Oven

1 Answer

F4


luvin, F4 is a shorted oven sensor. Under 950 ohms. Should read 1060 ohms at room temp. The sensor is located in the upper left hand corner of the rear oven wall. Remove the 2 screws and it will pull out enough to remove the connector. Catriver.

Aug 22, 2007 | GE JKS05 Electric Single Oven

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