Question about Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera

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Major Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera Problem!!!

My camera isn't making any shutter sound, but the LED light is on, and when I look through the viewfinder eyepiece I cannot see anything.

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zdenek vajdak

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The mirror box control mechanism needs servicing ( rubber parts have perished and are gumming up the workings of the mirror mechanism so shutter is not workingrking) . Unfortunatelly this requires complete strip down and so should be done professionally.

Posted on Aug 25, 2007

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When i put the camera to eye there is a round circle i can see through the rest is black I have tried every nikon lens i own . Nothing changes please help.


I have never used the D2X, but if it is anything like newer cameras, such as the D3, D800, etc., there is an eyepiece cover lever near the viewfinder that allows you to open and close the internal cover. It is used to to prevent stray light from leaking into the camera via the viewfinder when your eye isn't near the viewfinder such as when remotely triggering the camera. If your camera has that feature, it may be closed or partially closed.

Nov 13, 2015 | Nikon D2X Digital Camera

1 Answer

Camera is dead: no LED lights in the viewfinder


left unused for two years

=***** for a camera


see if it fits in the waste basket

Apr 06, 2017 | Minolta X-370S 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I have a Nikon N8008. There is a blinking error message and the indicator under it (maybe a film indicator) is blinking on the LCD screen. It will not allow me to see anything through the viewfinder...


I have 3 N8008s bodies and one of them started hanging up in the manner you describe, but only at 1/8000th sec. The reason you can't see through the viewfinder is because the mirror is up. One mine, pressing the shutter release button again brings it down. Some other solutions online suggest weak batteries, but I've ruled that out. It also seems that this is just something that can eventually happen with the N8008/N8008s. It bugs me that this started happening, but I only paid $16 for the camera and I've never, ever taken a photo at 1/8000th.

Aug 28, 2010 | Nikon N8008 AF 35mm SLR Camera

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Don't know what buttons on back of camera are for.


Besides the auto-flash mode, you can select fill flash, flash off, self-timer, and nighttime-view with or without flash.
Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON until the desired indicator appears on the LCD PANEL.
c3015.gif Fill flash and flash off modes remain selected after you take the picture. To cancel the selection, press the mode-selection button or close and reopen the lens cover/flash to return to the auto-flash mode.
Fill flash
c3014.gif When bright light indoors or outdoors comes from behind the subject (backlighting), dark shadows (especially on faces) may occur. Use fill flash to lighten these shadows.
  1. Open the LENS COVER/FLASH to raise the flash and to turn the camera ON.
  2. Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON repeatedly until the FILL-FLASH INDICATOR appears on the LCD PANEL.
  3. Frame your subject within the VIEWFINDER EYEPIECE.
  4. Partially depress the SHUTTER BUTTON. When the FLASH/CAMERA-READY LAMP turns off and the fill-flash indicator on the LCD panel stops blinking, fully depress the shutter button to take the picture.
Flash off
c3013.gif When you do not want to use the flash, especially indoors where flash is prohibited, such as in theaters and museums, or when you want to take twilight scenes or distant subjects that are beyond the flash range, or capture the ambiance of existing light, use the flash-off feature. Use a tripod or place the camera on another firm support, and use high-speed film because the shutter speed in these situations will most likely be slow.
  1. Open the LENS COVER/FLASH to raise the flash and to turn the camera ON.
  2. Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON repeatedly until the FLASH-OFF INDICATOR appears on the LCD PANEL.
  3. Frame your subject within the VIEWFINDER EYEPIECE.
  4. Press the SHUTTER BUTTON to take the picture.
Self-timer with auto flash
c3016.gif Use this feature to include yourself in pictures.
  1. Use the TRIPOD SOCKET to attach the camera to a tripod or place it on another firm support.
  2. Open the LENS COVER/FLASH to raise the flash and to turn the camera ON.
  3. Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON repeatedly until the SELF-TIMER INDICATOR appears on the LCD PANEL.
  4. Frame your subject within the VIEWFINDER EYEPIECE.
  5. Press the SHUTTER BUTTON. The SELF-TIMER LAMP will glow and then blink during the last three seconds of countdown.
    • To cancel the self-timer selection before the shutter releases, close the flash.
    • The self-timer automatically turns off after the shutter releases.
Night-view with flash
c3012.gif In this mode, the camera balances the flash and existing light exposure so you can take beautiful pictures of people at sunset or at night. Use a tripod or place the camera on another firm support, and use high-speed film because the shutter speed at night will most likely be slow.
  1. Open the LENS COVER/FLASH to raise the flash and to turn the camera ON.
  2. Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON repeatedly until the NIGHTTIME-VIEW INDICATOR with flash appears on the LCD PANEL.
  3. Frame your picture in the VIEWFINDER EYEPIECE.
  4. Press and hold the SHUTTER BUTTON for 12 seconds without lifting your finger. Note: If you remove your finger from the shutter button before 12 seconds, the shutter will time out immediately.
  5. After 12 seconds, release the shutter button to take the picture.
Night-view without flas
c3011.gif In this mode, you can capture the natural existing light of city-night scenes or fireworks at night. Use a tripod or place the camera on another firm support, and use high-speed film because the shutter speed at night will most likely be slow.
  1. Open the LENS COVER/FLASH to raise the flash and to turn the camera ON.
  2. Press the MODE-SELECTOR BUTTON repeatedly until the NIGHTTIME-VIEW INDICATOR without flash appears on the LCD PANEL.
  3. Frame your picture in the VIEWFINDER EYEPIECE.
  4. Press and hold the SHUTTER BUTTON for 12 seconds without lifting your finger. Note: If you remove your finger from the shutter button before 12 seconds, the shutter will time out immediately.
  5. After 12 seconds, release the shutter button to take the picture.

Jun 17, 2010 | Kodak Advantix C400AF APS Point and Shoot...

1 Answer

Light meter or not on Maxxum 4


Yes, it has program, aperture priority, shutter priority and manual modes.The aperture and shutter settings should be visible on both the right hand top plate LCD panel, and also in an illuminate LED panel below the image in the viewfinder.

From memory (and I might be wrong) the Dynax 4 (Maxxum 4 in North America, Dynax 3 in Asia Pacific) light meter simply indicated a plus or minus symbol to indicate over or under exposure for the selected combination of shutter and aperture. The viewfinder display would have a steady dot to confirm confirm focus follwed by the chosen shutter speed and aperture setting.

I cannot find a link to anything other than a German manual, but the diagrams and a bit of mental application will go a long way if you don't understand German.

Note that if your camera's electronics have failed then there's nothing you can realistically do other than to replace it. Spares are not available and as a consumer level model it was never really intended to be serviced or repaired.

Feb 24, 2010 | Konica Minolta Maxxum 4 / Dynax 4 QD 35mm...

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I followed the instructions in the manual, and put new batteries in + side up. Then I continued with the rest of that step, but I did not see a flashing red LED light anywhere. I do not understand what to...


A few things to try, based on my FG's operation: - The most obvious- are your batteries good? Correct type? If they are: - When all is well the red LED metering lights will appear in the viewfinder window on the right side, in the range of shutter speed numbers. - The red LED metering lights are only activated when you press the shutter release button (halfway). The lights go out after a few seconds if the shutter button is not held down. Just tap the shutter button to reactivate them. - The shutter speed setting dial must NOT be on B (Bulb) or M90 (non-electronic Manual mode) if you want to see the red LED metering lights. The lights do not operate on these two settings because metering is irrelevant here (you'd be doing the metering, not the camera). - If you're in P (Program mode) the lens aperture must be set all the way to the smallest setting (usually f22 or f16, depending on the lens). If not, you'll only see blinking lights at the top and bottom of the shutter speed range on the right in the viewfinder. That's a reminder to set the lens to the smallest (highest numeric) aperture.
Hope these help. The FG is a great little camera.

Aug 14, 2009 | Nikon FG 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How to KNOW the light is right 4 an Olympus OM20 Manual camera?


OM-20 was basically a upgraded OM-10 with the manual adapter built in and a number of other refinements.

The viewfinder has LED's to show the shutter speed recommended by the camera's lightmeter for the ISO and aperture selected. It also has an exposure compensation indicator (the +/- symbol) and an indicator for flash ready which doubles up as a post-exposure flash confirmation. There is also the indicator lamp to show manual mode has been selected. OM-10 lacks the manual mode lamp and the +/- indicator.

Like the OM-10, the OM-20 is primarily an aperture priority automatic camera. In this mode you set the ISO film speed, choose which aperture you wish to use (with the ability to use the lens depth of field preview button) and then the camera selects the correct shutter speed. The +/- exposure compensation control allows the user to tell the camera to modify the recommended shutter speed by up to two stops either way.

In manual mode, there is no manual metering. The light meter behaves exactly as it does in aperture priority mode and the viewfinder shows the recommended shutter speed and not the manually selected one. Correct metering is therefore a case of adjusting the aperture first, and then choosing the correct shutter speed indicated in the viewfinder. If the user then decides to select a different shutter speed, then the aperture ring must be adjusted to maintain the correct exposure. For example the aperture is set to f8 and the camera recommends 1/60th of a second. The user decides that a faster shutter speed is required and chooses 1/250th, but the viewfinder remains showing 1/60th. In order to keep the same exposure value the user must open the aperture by two full stops to f4. The camera's light meter will detect the new aperture setting and providing the light on the object is unchanged the viewfinder shutter speed display should now show 1/250th as well to confirm the correct adjustment. Alternatively, the user can choose the shutter speed first by looking at what has been set on the control ring (or by turning the ring to the end of its travel and then counting the clicks from there as all experienced OM users do) and then turning the aperture ring until the shutter speed shown in the viewfinder matches what's been manually set.

It all sounds clumsy and complex but is done far more quickly than I've taken to type this and becomes second nature.

Aperture priority metering is selected on the camera by choosing AUTO on the mode selecter. In this mode the shutter speed ring has no effect and the viewfinder always displays the automatically selected shutter speed.

May 09, 2009 | Olympus OM-2000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Viewfinder


The shutter remains closed on a DSLR until you take a picture. There is no way to preview an image that does not exist yet.

Being stuck with the tiny viewfinder as earlier cameras had is a good thing. Holding a camera out from your body will give mixed results due to your movements. You will get better results with the traditional method

Jun 08, 2008 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurry Images


The camera display is a two-stage progressive display. The image is roughed out, then the interleaving lines are filled in. This has no effect on the image itself, just the monitor display. Apart from the media, digital photography is the same as film photography, and subject to the same challenges and requires the same time-honored techniques. If your pictures are blurry, you may be shaking the camera. Practice holding the camera firmly to your eye, and squeeze (don't poke) the shutter release. If you are holding the camera at arms length to shoot - what can I say? You can also increase the ISO speed, so that the shutter speed is faster. You may not be focusing on the right area. Focus on the subject (line up the box in the viewfinder), particularly on the eyes, by pressing half-way on the shutter release. Holding, to lock the focus, re-point the camera to compose the picture before pressing the shutter release the rest of the way. Make sure you hold the shutter release and wait the 1/2 second or so for the exposure to complete (the 5700 is painfully slow), indicated by the "green" light in the eyepiece, before whipping the camera from your face.

Sep 19, 2005 | Nikon Coolpix 5700 Digital Camera

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