Question about Olympus Camedia C-5050 Zoom Digital Camera

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Viewfinder jammed The viewfinder is out of focus and does not move when the zoom control is operated. The main lens mechanism seems to work, the field of view changes on the LCD display and pictures taken are in focus. Perhaps the zoom mechanism makes more noise than it did. Does anyone know how the viewfinder is adjusted and whether repair is likely to be feasible? Thanks

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The mechanical link between Lens on V/F element has broken - Only Olympus will be able to do anything for you -check out the support site.

Posted on Aug 30, 2007

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What are the differences between viewfinder and rangefinder cameras?


A rangefinder is a camera that has a rangefinder mechanism. This is a device that measures subject distance. Through this device, you see two images. When the two images coincide through moving the dial, the correct distance is displayed. On older cameras, this was a separate device and one must transfer this to the lens.
Now they are built into the viewfinder. You have different viewfinders for different focal lengths (zoom lenses are difficult, as a result).
A viewfinder is what the photographer looks through to compose, and in many cases to focus, the picture. Most viewfinders are separate, and suffer parallax, while the single-lens reflex camera lets the viewfinder use the main optical system.

Apr 10, 2018 | Cameras

1 Answer

I get blurred indication on display and the pictures clicked are dark and not clear.


1. Your shutter speed's too slow

Take the effective focal length of your lens and divide it into 1 to get the minimum safe handheld shutter speed you should use. For example, with a 200mm equivalent lens, you shouldn't shoot any slower than 1/200sec or you risk camera shake. You might even get some shake at 1/500sec.

2. You're placing too much trust in VR

Nikon's Vibration Reduction system can let you shoot with shutter speeds four stops slower than usual - but don't count on it. This is a best-case scenario, and it's wise to assume no more than two stops. VR improves your success rate, it doesn't guarantee sharpness.

3. Your subject is moving

Moving subjects will appear blurred at slow shutter speeds, so even if you can hold your camera steady and even if the VR system does a great job, you will still need to use fast shutter speeds for moving subjects.

4. The ISO is too high

Sometimes you have to use really high ISOs just to avoid camera shake, but be aware that at the highest settings you will see a loss of detail. The camera uses noise reduction processes to reduce the appearance of noise, and these erode fine detail too.

field myths

Depth of field is the zone of near-to-far sharpness within your pictures, but it's only apparent sharpness, not real sharpness. Depth of field relies on objects looking sharp enough at normal viewing distances and magnifications even though they're ever so slightly out of focus. If you zoom in far enough, you will see that some objects aren't completely sharp even when they're technically within the depth of field limits.

6. Your lens aperture is too small

Small apertures used to be associated with better image quality. That was when lenses were comparatively unsophisticated and cameras used larger formats, such as 35mm and 120 roll film. But at small apertures an unavoidable optical effect called 'diffraction' sets in, where fine detail starts to blur. With today's smaller sensors and sophisticated zoom lens designs, you can see this as early as f/11. If you shoot at f/16 or f/22, your shots will be visibly softer than those shot at wider apertures.

7. You're focused on the wrong thing

Watch the AF points in the camera's viewfinder. If you're using auto-area AF, the camera will pick the nearest subject, which may not be what you intended. If you're using single-point AF, make sure the AF point's over the correct part of the scene. Tip: on some cameras, including the D3100, it's very easy to accidentally push the AF point to the right with the base of your thumb as you hold the camera and not notice.

8. Handheld close-ups shots are risky!

When you're really close to your subject, the depth of field is so small that the slightest movement on your part will throw your subject out of focus. The more you concentrate on staying still, the more you sway! Higher shutter speeds won't make the slightest difference - you need a tripod.

9. Focus/recompose errors

It's often useful to focus on one thing then keep the shutter button half-pressed so that you can recompose the picture and shoot. But in that time, you may have moved, the subject may have moved or, if the camera's in its default AF-A mode, it make think the subject is moving, switch to AF-C (continuous) operation and attempt to re-focus.

10. Is your lens clean?

If you walk into a humid indoor environment, your lens may mist up, producing a blurry, soft-focus effect. Other causes of blur are greasy smears and fingermarks - so check the front of your lens before blaming the camera.

Aug 02, 2015 | Cameras

1 Answer

D200 autofocus My Nikon D200 is amazing. Most of the time, i keep it set like a simple point and shoot, but i find the ability to move the focus fields across the lens to be invaluable. unfortunately,...


Can you check that you haven't moved the little toggle switch on the side of the 4-way controller/wheel to the L (or Lock) position? If it's locked then you won't be able to move the focus field in the viewfinder.

Jun 20, 2017 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

Nikon autofocus shows r10 and the autofcus is not working when I zoom in and seems to be making a noise


The "r10" message in the viewfinder is NOT an error code. The "r" stands for "remainder" and the "10" is the value. Together, it tells you how many more photos the camera's built in, high speed memory buffer can hold BEFORE the shutter will be stopped - so that the pictures in this memory can be transferred to the removable memory card. The process will take a few seconds or more - depending on the speed of the memory card you provided in the camera. If you pay attention to the the "r" number, while taking photos is rapid succession, after each picture - the number will decrease by one. When it reaches 0, you can no longer take additional pictures. During this time - the camera is moving the pictures to the memory card. When done, the "r" number will be high again, and the shutter will operate again.

The auto focus motor will make some noise it is turning to advance or retract the focus mechanism, and is normal. The camera requires sufficient contrast to obtain focus. Most of the time, a well lit subject will provide this. If you are zoomed in on a rather featureless subject - such as a clear or overcast sky, solid color flat wall, etc., where there is a lack of contrasting objects in the viewfinder, the camera can not detect an "edge" on any object; so it attempts to focus over the entire range of the lens to find it. If it can't, it prevents the shutter from releasing.

There is also a minimum distance that the lens will focus, too. If you are trying to zoom in on a close object, the lens may not be able to do it. In this case: either back away, zoom out - or both. If you need to get close to objects, you should consider buying "Macro" lenses. Nikon brand lenses that do this type of photography, oddly are called "Micro" lenses instead.

I hope this helps. Good luck!

Oct 09, 2011 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera with 18-55mm Lens

1 Answer

I have a canon xsi that I have been using successfully for a year and a half. All of a sudden the focus preview is not working. It doesn't matter what lens I am using. I shoot in manual mode. What I...


When you depress the shutter button halfway, you are (in fact) activating the focus mechanism.
If in AF mode, you should hear the 'beep' when focus is achieved.
However, bear in mind that the XSi has three focussing modes: Quick mode, Live View, and Manual. There is a difference in how focussing is achieved between the Quick and Live View modes. (see page 102 onwards of the user manual "using AF to focus").
Also, the barrel of the lens will move during the focus operation.
If this does not happen, then there is a definate problem.
Having images in focus despite having no movement on the lens, simply means that the aperture settings are probably small enough to give sufficient depth of field to include your subject.

Jun 12, 2011 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Manual Focus won't work


Which camera are you using? If the body has AF/MF switch, put that also to MF.If this fails to help, take out the lens and try to change it to MF.

Feb 05, 2009 | Nikon Zoom-Nikkor 55-200mm f/4-5.6G IF-ED...

2 Answers

SLR not working


The lens you are talking about has either:
1)a faulty diaphragm mechanism ( lens stays closed at f 22 or f 16 when you attach it to the camera instead of opening fully as it should ) . or
2) the lens is fine but the diaphragm coupling mechanism inside mirror box ( on the left hand side if viewed from the front ) is not engaging the lens properly so that your lens stays fully closed ( F 22 /16 ) : because diaphragm stays fully closed image in viewfinder appears v. dark.
Solution ? have a camera technician take a look but my guess is that the diaphragm needs cleaning and it should not cost you more than $ 80 bucks.

Nov 26, 2007 | Pentax *ist D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Focusing wont work after dropping


probably the lens inside is damaged or the mechanism which moves the lens is damaged. Focus works with a moving mechanism which moves the lens back and forth.

Oct 07, 2007 | Canon PowerShot SD500 / IXUS 700 Digital...

1 Answer

Strange mechanical sound from lens area


Cele, The noise you're hearing is perfectly normal. This generation camera uses a piezo electric focus mechanism to operate the lens. You will notice that the noise goes away if the camera is left alone for a moment while focused on a non moving object, this is because the focus adjustment is made and then the piezo circuit shuts down to conserve battery power. You should have no problems with this camera, it is very reliable. Hope this helps you. Joe Weibel customelectronics.org

Aug 31, 2006 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-W5 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Out of focus viewfinder, zoom problems


1. Stop shooting while out on a shoot: Perhaps the batteries were running low? 2. Lens won't retract all the way and close: Could be same reason as #1.? 3. Viewfinder is out of focus in wide mode: Could it be that camera was left in "Macro Mode" (Flower icon)? Did you set, "Custom Function 1, or 2," and accidentally set the unintended exposure mode? 4. Sticks in telephoto, won't return to wide, blurry shots: Probably cold weather related? Perhaps, "reboot" the camera by removing all batteries for over 10-15 seconds, and replace with a freshly recharged set of NIMH batteries? If all of the above failed, then I'd say take it back to where you purchased it, and get a replacement unit. Good luck. ^_^

Sep 14, 2005 | Canon PowerShot A75 Digital Camera

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