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Permissions of access

¿Is it possible once created a shared resource, and in this resource created folders, to modify the permissions of access to some of these created folders inside this resource?

Posted by jfkonde on

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Anonymous

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Posted on Oct 06, 2007

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Hi, I have two pc running with windows xp operating system. From User 1 i need to access user 2 windows folder and program files folder otherway around also but I can't how? Even if I shared windows folder...

First thing Windows XP Home Edition will give you numerous problems when sharing files, you should consider using windows XP Pro for that sort of operations.

Assuming you have Windows XP Pro installed in both computers:

1 - Create the same user on both computers ( same account name, same password ) blank passwords are not allow between file sharing as per windows xp group policy.

2 - Create a resource to share ( example: C:\)

3 - Disable simple file sharing

* go to control panel
* click on folder options
* click the VIEW tab
* unckeck the use sharing wizard

4 - Make sure that the user that will be used for authenticating between computers have the proper NTFS permissions and the proper access to the shared sources.

5 - Try to connect to the shared sources when asked for username and password type the credentials of the newly created user.

Now you should be able to connect to the shared sources both ways.

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How can i set up network file sharing

First step is to check if the file sharing option is checked in my computer folder options.

Start- My computer- TOOLS - FOLDER OPTIONS- and click on the second tab VIEW- scroll down to the last option which will show as USE SIMPLE FILE SHARING.

Level 1: My Documents (Private) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); The owner of the file or folder has read and write permission to the file or folder. Nobody else may read or write to the folder or the files in it. All subfolders that are contained in a folder that is marked as private remain private unless you change the parent folder permissions.

If you are a Computer Administrator and create a user password for your account by using the User Accounts Control Panel tool, you are prompted to make your files and folder private.

Note The option to make a folder private (Level 1) is available only to a user account in its own My Documents folder.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 1, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Select the Make this Folder Private check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 2 (Default): My Documents (Default) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); The owner of the file or folder and local Computer Administrators have read and write permission to the file or folder. Nobody else may read or write to the folder or the files in it. This is the default setting for all the folders and files in each user's My Documents folder.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 2, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Make sure that both the Make this Folder Private and the Share this folder on the network check boxes are cleared, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 3: Files in shared documents available to local users loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); Files are shared with users who log on to the computer locally. Local Computer Administrators can read, write, and delete the files in the Shared Documents folder. Restricted Users can only read the files in the Shared Documents folder. In Windows XP Professional, Power Users may also read, write, or delete any files in the Shared Documents Folder. The Power Users group is available only in Windows XP Professional. Remote users cannot access folders or files at Level 3. To allow remote users to access files, you must share them out on the network (Level 4 or 5).

To configure a file or a folder and all the files in it to Level 3, start Microsoft Windows Explorer, and then copy or move the file or folder to the Shared Documents folder under My Computer.

Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • Power Users: Change
  • Restricted Users: Read
  • System: Full Control
Network Share Permissions:
  • Not Shared
Level 4: Shared on the Network (Read-Only) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); Files are shared for everyone to read on the network. All local users, including the Guest account, can read the files. But they cannot modify the contents. Any user can read and change your files.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 4, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security.
  2. Click to select the Share this folder on the network check box
  3. Click to clear the Allow network users to change my files check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
  • Everyone: Read
Network Share Permissions:
  • Everyone: Read
Level 5: Shared on the network (Read and Write) loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); This level is the most available and least secure access level. Any user (local or remote) can read, write, change, or delete a file in a folder shared at this access level. We recommend that this level be used only for a closed network that has a firewall configured. All local users including the Guest account can also read and modify the files.

To configure a folder and all the files in it to Level 5, follow these steps:
  1. Right-click the folder, and then click Sharing and Security
  2. Click to select the Share this folder on the network check box, and then click OK.
Local NTFS Permissions:
  • Owner: Full Control
  • Administrators: Full Control
  • System: Full Control
  • Everyone: Change
Network Share Permissions:
  • Everyone: Full Control
Note All NTFS permissions that refer to Everyone include the Guest account.

All the levels that this article describes are mutually exclusive. Private folders (Level 1) cannot be shared unless they are no longer private. Shared folders (Level 4 and 5) cannot be made private until they are unshared.

If you create a folder in the Shared Documents folder (Level 3), share it on the network, and then allow network users to change your files (Level 5), the permissions for Level 5 are effective for the folder, the files in that folder, and the subfolders. The other files and folders in the Shared Documents folder remain configured at Level 3.
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How can I set Outlook so that it's separate access for my boss and I to communicate or for me to view his calendar (mirror)? Can I do this? HOW? Please provide the printscreen pics. Not sure why, but...

1. How can I set Outlook so that it's separate access for my boss and I?
r:/ question: are you both (you and your boss) using the same computer account?, as long as you have outlook installed and if your boss and you are using different accounts you should have separate access to outlook.

2. view his calendar (mirror): usully you would need an exchange server, if you do see if this helps: sorry I have no pics but try to follow the instructions and post back with your questions:

this is assuming you have outlook 2003

In Calendar, in the Navigation Pane (Navigation Pane: The column on the left side of the Outlook window that includes panes such as Shortcuts or Mail and the shortcuts or folders within each pane. Click a folder to show the items in the folder.), click Share My Calendar.

1.

HideI don't see Share My Calendar
Share My Calendar does not appear unless you are using an Exchange Server e-mail account. What is an Exchange Server account? Also, if you have the Navigation Pane turned off or covered by the main Calendar window, you won't see it. Hide or show the Navigation Pane.
2. Do one of the following:

HideAllow anyone to access your Calendar
1. In the Name box, click Default.
2. Under Permissions, in the Permission Level list, click the permission level that you want.

For details about permission levels, see Outlook folder permissions.

You can create custom permissions by selecting the check boxes and options under Permissions.

HideSpecify the people who can access your Calendar
1. Click Add.
2. In the Add Users dialog box, in the Type Name or Select from List box, enter the name of the person whom you want to grant sharing permissions to.
3. Under Add Users, click Add, and then click OK.
4. In the Name box, click the name of the person you just added.
5. Under Permissions, in the Permission Level list, click the permission level that you want.

For details about permission levels, see Outlook folder permissions.

You can create custom permissions by selecting the check boxes and options under Permissions.

Important If you select the Private check box on a Calendar item in Microsoft Office Outlook 2003, do not grant Read permission to your Calendar folder to anyone whom you do not want to see private items. A person who is granted Read permission to access your folders could use programmatic methods or other e-mail applications to view the details in a private item.


source:
sharing a calendar in outlook

now if you don't have an exchange server you may need another tool to make this work: like officecalendar, or try to see if the instructions proposed in the following link work

good luck!
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Network access denied

Follow the steps to Sharing the files

Your computers are already connected to a network — i.e., they’re all already able to browse the Internet using the same router..

1 : Open the Network and Sharing Center window by clicking on the Windows orb in the lower left corner, and then either right-clicking on Network and selecting “Properties”, or opening the Control Panel and double-clicking “Network and Sharing Center.
2 : If your network type is “Public,” you need to change it to “Private”:
  1. To the right of the network name and location type, click Customize.
  2. In the Set Network Location dialog box, click Private, and then click Next.
  3. In the Successfully set network settings dialog box, click Close.
3 : Under “Sharing and Discovery” in the bottom half of the Network and Sharing Center window, you need to turn all the settings from “Off” to “On” by clicking on the down arrow next to each setting, clicking on “Turn on …”, and clicking on “Apply.” But see some pointers below:
  1. For the “Password protected sharing” setting: you may want to leave this “On” or turn “Off” at your discretion. (I turned mine off.)
  2. For the “Public folder sharing” setting:
    1. If you want to share the public folder so that other computers on the network can access the Public share to open files, but not create or change files, click Turn on sharing so anyone with network access can open files. This is the default setting.
    2. But if you want to share the public folder so that other computers on the network can access the Public share to open files and also create or change files, click Turn on sharing so anyone with network access can open, change, and create files.
4 : You’re done with the Network and Sharing Center window. Close it via the “X” button.
5 : Click the Windows orb at the lower left corner of your computer, and click on Computer
6 :
n the Computer window, navigate to the folder containing the file(s) or folder(s) that you want to share — e.g., “Pictures” or “Documents” or a specific file or folder within. Note: don’t open the folder itself that you want to share — just navigate to the folder that contains this folder.
7 : Right-click the folder that you want to share, and then click Share. The File Sharing window is displayed. (Click picture for a larger version.)
8 : If you have password protected sharing enabled: Use the File Sharing window to select which users can access the shared folder and their permission level. To allow all users, select Everyone in the list of users. By default, the permission level for a selected user is Reader. Users cannot change files or create new files in the share. To allow a user to change files or folders or create new files or folders, select Co-owner as the permission level.
9 : If you have password protected sharing disabled (like I do): Click the drop-down arrow inside the blank field in the File Sharing window, and select the Guest or Everyone account. Click “Add.” Then for that new account, click on the down arrow under “Permission Level” to change it to Co-owner (if you want anybody to read and modify files) or leave it at “Reader” (if you want other computers to just read but not modify your files).
10 : Click “Share”, then “Done.”


CRITICAL NOTE: If you selected “Everyone” when sharing a folder, you’re also making its contents available to any computer that joins this network. Many households, including mine, have wireless Internet via a wifi router. If you don’t have WEP encryption turned on, then I could just drive up and park on the street near your home, open my laptop, let it join your network via your wifi, and then nose around through your files. It’s particularly important that you have WEP encryption turned on for your wifi network.
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Password on shared documents on a workgroup

Password Protect Folders in XP
To password protect a folder built into Windows XP (for other Windows flavors, there are some freeware/shareware programs out there).
If you have a log in password for your account, this can be used to protect folders from other users. If not, you need to creat one. Your hard drive must be formatted using NTFS (which it probably is unless you're dual booting with another operating system). Here's what to do...
Right-click the folder that you want to make private and choose "Properties" (or Alt+Double-click). Go to the "Sharing" tab and check the "Make this folder private" box.
private-folder1.jpg
Click Apply . If you do not have a password on your account, a box will pop up asking if you want to assign a password. This must be done if you want to make the folder private, so click Yes . You will need to use your password to log on to your computer from then on.
Type in a password then confirm it. Click the "Create Password" button then close the Password window.
Click OK in the Properties dialog box.
Now anyone else logged on to your computer can't access that file without knowing your password.
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File sharing

it is possible

If you have multiple computers in your home and they are connected through a home network, you can share files among your computers. That means you no longer have to copy files to a floppy disk or USB flash drive to transfer them to another computer. Once you configure your computer to share files, you (or another user with the appropriate permissions) can, by using Windows Explorer, open them from other computers connected to the network, just like you’d open files that are stored on a single computer. You can also choose to have folders visible—but not modifiable—from other computers on the network.
To share files on your computer with other computers on a network, you need to:
Share a folder on your computer. This will make all of the files in the folder available to all the computers on your network (you can’t share individual files).
Set up user accounts on your computer for everyone who needs to connect to your shared folder. If any of the accounts are Limited User accounts (unless an account is a Computer Administrator account, it is a Limited User account), follow the steps in Set permissions for files and folders to enable them to open your files.

To access shared files that are on another computer on your network, you need to:
• Connect to the shared folder from other computers on the network. This procedure is described in Map a network drive.

Note: By default, file permissions only allow your user account and administrators on your local computer to open your files, regardless of whether a person is sitting at your keyboard or at another computer. It may help to keep these three things in mind when setting up file sharing:
• Files have user permission settings.
• Every computer has its own user database.
• Some accounts are administrator accounts and some aren’t.

Configure your computer to share files To share a folder on your computer so that files stored in the folder can be accessed from other computers on your home network
1.
Log on to your computer as an administrator. For more information, see Access the administrator account from the Welcome screen.
2.
Click Start, and then click My Documents.
68599-click-my-documents.gif 3.
Right-click the folder that you want to share, and then click Sharing and Security.
68599-click-sharing-and-security.gificotip.gif Tip: If you want to share your entire My Documents folder, open My Documents, and then click the Up button on the toolbar. You can then select the My Documents folder.
4.
If you see a message that reads, As a security measure, Windows has disabled remote access to this computer, click the Network Setup Wizard link. Then follow the instructions in How to set up your computer for home networking. On the File and printer sharing page of the Network Setup Wizard, be sure to select Turn on file and printer sharing. If you do not see this message, skip this step and go to step 5.
68599-click-network-setup-wizard.gif Note: If you do not see the Network Setup Wizard link or the Share this folder on the network check box, your computer probably has Simple File Sharing disabled. This is a common change made to computers used for business. In fact, it happens automatically when a computer joins an Active Directory domain. You should follow these instructions to share a folder instead.
5.
In the Properties dialog box, select the Share this folder on the network check box.
68599-click-share-this-folder.gif 6.
If you want to be able to edit your files from any computer on your network (instead of just being able to open them without saving any changes), select the Allow network users to change my files check box.
68599-click-allow-network-users-to-change-my-files.gif 7.
Click OK.
68599-click-ok.gif Windows Explorer will show a hand holding the folder icon, indicating that the folder is now shared.
To connect to the shared folder from another computer, follow the steps described in How to map a network drive.
Note: By default, only you and other people with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder will be able to open your files. To limit access of specific users with an administrator account on the computer sharing the folder, read How to set permissions for files and folders.
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Access Dened on Local networked drive

if u r using NTFS you should go to the shared folder-->right click it-->click sharing and security -->go to security tab-->add the your user and give it full permission.

you may need to be logged with same user name on the other Pc that has the mapped drive .
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Can't access my share folders

Drive management show only safely remove usb drive.
When u use mionet software it map the share to a drive letter. If u create folder or files on that drive u dont have permission to chance those files or folders on \\mybookworld.
Solution, dont use mionet software.
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