Question about Canon EOS-10D Digital Camera

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Incorrect Light Meter

In all the automatic settings the pictures are being over exposed due (I assume) a problem with the light meter reading. Even when I am outside in bright sunlight my 10D pops up the flash.

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  • Anonymous Mar 24, 2014

    Doesn't seem to meter the light right in the photo's

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Make sure you have correctly set the Iso/ASA factor correctly and the flash is switched off Check out the Full manual which is a PDF file on the CD

Posted on Aug 05, 2007

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2 Answers

Camera exilim ex-s600 will not take pictures outside,pictures turning out white,yet will take pictures inside ok.is this a worthwhile repair


This seems to be a software problem with your camera. Your camera should, if on AUTO mode, automatically expose your photo accurately. Try half pressing the shutter button (used to take pictures) while outside to adjust focus and exposure, then press the button fully to take picture. If your camera cannot adjust to take a properly exposed picture (not bright white), then it is possible that the shutter speed is stuck on a too high speed, outside daytime shutter speed should be fast (1/1000 sec). Or if your shutter speed adjust accurately, it could be the aperture if the aperture is not small enough for daylight shooting. This is likely a software problem. Try adjusting your settings manually and see if the picture turns out!

Sep 10, 2011 | Casio EXILIM Card EX-S770 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have a nikon coolpix l100 and I was wondering how to take pictures outside at night? what settings do I put the camera on? all my pictures outside at night turn out very very dark


There are nighttime settings for most cameras. This can be an auto setting where the camera will automatically detect the light level and set the exposure rate.
On a manual setting, you need to consult your manual as to the options of can be set such as:
aperture (how big the hole is to let light in)
f-stop (speed of the shutter)
exposure time (how long to expose the CCD)
Flash on or off.

all of these items should be explained in your manual.
If you did not get a manual, the please look up these items in a search engine to get an understanding of how to balance your exposures.
Flash photography is not the only nighttime way to take picture.

I hope this was of some help.

Sep 27, 2010 | Nikon Cameras

2 Answers

Hi, My Nikon D80 is now kaing over exposed


This can happen if you have ISO control set to Auto and have spot metering selected, especially if it's set to spot shadow or spot highlight. Over exposure probably means it's set to spot shadow metering.

With spot metering the camera measures exposure from just a very small point in the scene, and so slight camera movements will cause the metering spot to wander onto different exposure settings very easily. If the camera is either set to use restricted apertures or shutter speeds due to program or lens limitations then it will compensate by adjusting the ISO settings instead

Never use auto ISO, just choose what you need for the conditions rather than using the camera's best (& usually poor) guess. Alsonever use spot metering unless you know why you're using it. The default multi-pattern metering is extremely accurate for most situations.

Please check the camera settings based on what I've said, if it fixes your problem then please rate my answer. If not then please add further details of which lenses and camera settings you're using and I'll try to help you further.

Oct 31, 2009 | Cameras

1 Answer

Dark photos


  • Be sure camera is set to the Green auto, not the A (A= aperture priority)
  • Be sure your white balance is on auto.
  • Be sure your EV is set to 0
  • Be sure your lens is on M/A, not M
  • Check the internal meter. See if it is showing a middle of the graph reading when the camera is on auto. If it is and you still get dark pix, might be time for Nikon repair.

Mar 12, 2009 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera

3 Answers

Over exposure


Hey - have the same problem. All my still pictures are coming out overexposed, no matter what setting I use. Tried resetting, tried new battery, tried new memory card, tried different exposure settings. Nothing fixed it or affected it. However, my movie exposure works great so I can take movies just fine. Are you able to take movies with no overexposure?

Jul 25, 2008 | Canon Powershot SD450 / IXUS 55 Digital...

1 Answer

Pictures washed out


Washed out I would guess looks like it's all white or a lot of white instead of the colors on the pictures. My guess is that your camera is over-exposing the pictures. Usually keeping it in automatic should solve your problem. But if it still doesn't, then it might be that you have an offsetting function that I think is called EV, which is either a plus or a minus function. Plus for over-exposing and minus or under-exposing. Read the manual and look for this function. Usually keeping it on auto is enough. Let me know if this helps.

Jul 15, 2008 | Casio Exilim EX-S500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon d50


the flashing means that the exposure is not correct for that area. if that area was the subject, then you might want to adjust the settings to reduce sensitivity in order to view that area correctly. if you spot meter the 'true subject' in the frame, there will often be areas outside that subject that are either brighter or more dimly lit. but exposure will be right for the subject. it can't all be correctly exposed if there is much variation in lighting. fill flashes will provide more light to the subject, thus resulting in a reduction in sensitivity of the resulting settings. (shorter exposure time or smaller aperture or a combination of both) and that will let the brighter areas move closer to 'not washing out' or being over exposed as some people refer to it. in either approach, its not a defect or problem unless it bothers you. the flashing just lets you know that you can modify settings if it matters that the photograph has high levels of contrast beyond what you may want. sometimes the subject is not in the center, and thus not metered for. but the framing is set to include something off to the side. you can reset exposure by adjusting exposure compensation so that while you are reading a darker area than that of the subject, you don't want the camera to use that area for light settings necessarily.
recap: exposure control via exposure compensation or fill flash
mark

Dec 22, 2007 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Overexposure and vertical lines


My E550 started producing over exposed frames (everythings white except maybe across top) with lines.This just happens outside.On inside the pictures are great.
BGibbons

Sep 09, 2007 | Fuji FinePix E550 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Light Meter


Check your metering settings. Are you using centerweighted, matrix, or spot metering? Try setting camera to matrix metering, use program mode 'P' and adjust exposure to default.

Sep 05, 2007 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera

1 Answer

CANON Rebel RTI Outdoor pictures are dark


learning to use light metering correctly can have its challenge.
the manual will guide you on how to set up to read light from the subject. spot metering a dark area will cause general overexposure, or a washed out look. spot metering a bright area will cause a dark image. if you are on spot meter and shoot two people standing together against a bright lit background, your meter will see between them if they are centered, and read all that bright background, setting the camera to a less sensitive combination of aperture / shutter speed, resulting in a dark image. use field averaging meter setting and be sure you are metering the subject and not the background. try shooting a wall that is fairly clear of other colors and uniform it light hitting it, you should have a correctly exposed image. since it works in other modes (at least 1, anyway) then it is unlikely you have an exposure compensation issue. that is the only other non defect issue that would cause your problem.
once you confirm that you have these settings correct and still get a dark image, its time to have it serviced.
good luck
mark

Sep 01, 2007 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera...

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