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What are the different types of dive computers?

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aron5566

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The two main types of dive computers are wrist dive computers and console dive computers. Wrist dive computers are actually just like wrist-watches (a little bigger) and are worn on the diver's wrist. Right now, they are smallest dive computers available.

Console dive computers are attached to the diver's equipment by a hose. Main difference between console dive and wrist dive computers is that console dive computers include pressure devices in them.

Posted on Feb 06, 2013

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1 Answer

What type of information do dive computers display?


Dive computers display a large variety of information relevant to the diver's needs. Such information includes: Current depth, elapsed dive time, and how much time remaining the diver has before having to make decompression stops.

Feb 06, 2013 | Scuba Diving & Snorkeling

1 Answer

How much do dive computers cost?


Dive computers are pretty expensive. They start at around $200, but the higher quality ones are sold between $400-$1000 - For a complete list of prices, check out these links: http://www.scuba.com/scuba_gear.asp_category_16_sortby_unitprice http://www.scuba.com/scuba_gear.asp_category_17_sortby_unitprice

Feb 06, 2013 | Scuba Diving & Snorkeling

1 Answer

What is the feature of air integration in dive computers?


Air integration feature allows the diver to measure tank pressure and calculate how much time has left before having to finish the dive. For more information, check out this website: http://divecomputer.com.au/types-of-dive-computers/

Feb 06, 2013 | Scuba Diving & Snorkeling

1 Answer

What are dive computers?


Dive computers are computer devices that allow a diver to measure both the time under water and the depth level he has reached. This allows the diver to avoid having DCS, or decompression sickness.

Jan 10, 2013 | Scuba Diving & Snorkeling

1 Answer

Can i install a different hard drive


You can install any hard dive brand as long as it IDE type, you might be able to install Sata hard drive if your computer mother board support that too!

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/mustafa_06f84c65ab5cc745

Nov 15, 2011 | IBM ThinkCentre M52 8113 - P4 551 3.4 GHz...

1 Answer

I have packed my computer in my backpack and after a few hours now i picked it up and found that it's in the dive mode: top line normally shows no-deco time = so now it's showing 9:59 (like in the...


All dive computers will automatically come off dive mode when they are out of water. sounds like you may have water in it. I strongly recommend that you do not dive with this unit but send/take back to the place where you got it. I would guess it is still under warranty. Hope that helps

Oct 19, 2010 | Tusa Zen Wrist Dive Computer (IQ900)...

1 Answer

How do you adjust the cobra to be more lenient or conservative


You can make personal adjustments to 3 different presents. This is explained on page 38 of the manual located at the link below.

http://media.suunto.com/media/suunto/manuals/en_US/cobra_manual_en_v3_m56577569830658693.pdf

Mar 09, 2009 | Suunto Cobra Integrated Computer

1 Answer

Can you use a snorkel mask for scuba diving?


There is a reason for the difference in price, one is purely for surface observation and the other is able to stand the pressures of deeper water diving... If your going to scuba dive the investment is worth it, don't skimp on safety…

Dec 01, 2008 | Vision Mares Pure Mask

1 Answer

How and why scuba gauges give a diver critical information while scuba diving?


Scuba gauges give a diver three very important pieces of information: 1. Time 2. Depth 3. Air Consumption This information enables a diver to stay within safe time and depth limits and avoid running out of air. There are many different devices on the market to help with this, from simple gauges to complex digital consoles. Time If a diver is not using a dive computer to monitor their nitrogen, they dive according to approved dive tables. To use dive tables properly, a diver needs to track their downtime. This can be done with a good dive watch. Two things make a good dive watch: water resistance and a rotating bezel. 1. Water Resistance. Good dive watches are rated to a depth in meters or feet (e.g. 200 feet) or a pressure rating in atmospheres (e.g. 4atm). Even though most divers probably won’t dive below 130 feet (the recreational dive limit), a good dive watch should be rated to 200 feet. Note: There is a difference between “water resistance” and “waterproof”. A “waterproof” watch is what you would wear in the shower, but would probably start leaking at 15-20 feet. 2. Rotating Bezel. A bezel is an adjustable ring on the face of the dive watch with a pointer indicator. At the beginning of a dive, the pointer on the bezel is aligned with the minute hand where it stays though out the dive. At the end of the dive, you compare the difference between the bezel and the minute hand to find out the length of the dive. The bezel should only move “counterclockwise”. It is possible to accidently move the bezel during a dive. Because of this, watchmakers make sure any accidental movement will turn the time in a conservative direction, making the dive longer rather than shorter. Depth Another important part of scuba gauges is a depth gauge. A depth gauge enables a diver to keep track of their depth even if they cannot see the water’s surface. Gauges can be either an analog (needle-and-dial) device or a digital device. Both work in the same way. They measure the surrounding water pressure and convert this into an accurate reading of your depth. Another feature of a good depth gauge is a maximum depth indicator. This tells a diver their maximum during a dive and must be reset after each dive. Air Consumption Another equally important part of scuba gauges is a submersible pressure gauge (SPG). This is connected to the first stage with a high-pressure hose and measures the pressure of the air in the tank. The SPG is much like the gas gauge on a car. At the beginning of a dive, a diver starts with a full tank. This should be about 3000 psi or 200 bars. As the diver breathes during the dive, the gauge will move slowly downwards. This allows the diver to have enough air left in the tank to: 1. Make a slow, safe ascent 2. Make any necessary decompression stops 3. Inflate their BCD once at the surface 4. Breath from the regulator if the surface conditions are rough A submersible pressure gauge also allows a diver to stop diving with air still in the tank. This keeps contaminants from entering the tank due to no air pressure. Wrist Depth Gauge Scuba gauges come in two basic styles. Stand alone gauges or gauge consoles. Stand alone gauges such as a wrist mounted depth gauge or a submersible pressure gauge attached to the first stage of a regulator are great backups when using digital gauges. Gauge consoles allow divers to have all their gauges in one place. Although less easy to read, analog gauges sometimes give slightly more accurate readings than digital gauges, particularly at shallow depth. Submersible Pressure Gauge Choosing Scuba Gauges When choosing scuba gauges, remember to look for: 1. Easy-to-read numbers 2. Luminescent dial or back lighting options 3. Rotating/swivel mounting 4. Easy disassembly for cleaning or replacing parts 5. Good warranty

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

3 Answers

Scuba suit need?


"Wet suits and dry suits are very important when it comes to scuba diving. Your normal body temperature hovers around 98.6F (37C). If you are scuba diving in water that is cooler than your body temperature your temperature will drop. In all water, even the warmest, tropical waters, you will need thermal protection, like a wet suit, dry suit or dive skin, to keep warm and to keep safe while scuba diving. The cold affects our ability to think and our physical response time slows, which can lead to an accident. Warm tropical water will begin to feel cold after prolonged scuba diving, so it is always a good idea to wear light insulation at a minimum. When choosing thermal protection, like a wet suit or dry suit, you need to consider the following factors: Water temperature Your activity level during a dive Your body size You should always wear more insulation in colder water and lighter insulation in warmer water. Your level of activity can be a good indicator of how much insulation you should wear during a scuba dive. The more active you are during a dive the more heat your body generates and the warmer you remain throughout your dive. Larger scuba divers may need less insulation than smaller scuba divers and small, muscular scuba divers may need less insulation than larger scuba divers. It is important for you to try different amounts of insulation in differing water temperatures to determine what you need. Some scuba divers need more insulation than others, regardless of activity or size. Some scuba divers can dive in tropical water wearing only a lycra body suit, commonly known as a dive skin, while others need a 2mm wet suit. Some scuba divers can dive in cold water wearing only a 6mm wet suit, while others need the protection of a dry suit. If you are scuba diving in water below 55F (12.7C), a dry suit is the warmest type of thermal insulation available. Dive skins, wet suits and dry suits also protect your skin from cuts, scrapes, abrasions and stings which can occur while you are scuba diving. A simple brush against specific forms of coral and fish can cause painful irritations and burns on bare skin, but may not be noticeable or even occur, if your skin is protected."

Dec 01, 2008 | ACCO Brands Apollo Bio-Filter Moisture...

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