Question about FUJIFILM S4000 Black 14.0 MP 24mm Wide Angle Digital Camera

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How to blur portrait backgrounds on a finepix s4000?

I want to take portrait shots where the subject is in focus and the background is blurry - any tips?

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kakima

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You're looking for a narrow depth of field. Take a look at this tip.

Posted on Jan 29, 2013

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Anonymous

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SOURCE: Fujifil FinePix S6500fd: How to focus

What you are asking about is called depth of field. Boiled down, it means that there is a certain amount of area in an image that is in focus, given the focal length of the lens, the aperture (size of the shutter opening) and some other factors. There's a lot of theory behind it, but you just want to know how to accomplish that creative blur behind the subject, right?

If your camera has the capability to choose the aperture, known as the f-stop, either with a manual mode or an aperture-priority mode, then this is pretty easy. The larger the aperture (size of shutter opening) the smaller the depth of field, which means only a small area is in focus. The aperture, or f-stop, is denoted with numbers like F/2.8 or F/8, etc. The lower the number, the bigger the aperture and the more background blur you will get. There is an inverse relation ship between shutter opening and speed, too. A big opening like F2.8 means a faster shutter speed, versus a small opening like F/22. Every lens is different, so your aperture options will vary.

If your camera does not allow you to choose the aperture, it may still have a "scene" setting you can use. A "portrait" or "night" setting usually has a bigger aperture than, say, a "landscape" setting.

Other factors also contribute to creating background blur. All else being equal, the blur increases as you move closer to the subject or as you zoom in on the subject with a zoom lens. Also, having greater space between the background and your subject increases blur.

So, to maximize background blur and create a shallow depth of field, you want to pick the largest aperture possible (smallest f-stop number), you want to get close to the subject and extend your zoom as much as you can, and you want to maximize the distance between the subject and the start of any background objects. Your success will depend in part on your camera and lenses.

If all else fails, you can also artificially create the background blur in software after the image is taken, but that's another story!

Posted on Dec 16, 2010

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How to blur background in fuljifilm finepix s2980??? Plz tell me as i want to click pictures urgently .

Background blur is a consequence of a shallow depth of field, meaning that the distance where things are in focus is a small area in front of you. Closer, it's blured. Further and is blured too.

Backbround blur can be obtained with:

  1. using a big aperture - you can't change the aperture on the Finepix, as it hasn't a diaphragma, but a ND filter.
  2. using a long lens - that means you have to use the biggest zoom you can with your camera
  3. close subject and distant background - when you use a longer lens, the depth of field get shallow, so you have to garantee that the background is out of the zone where everything is on focus.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7APi_fckT0
Sep 25, 2018 • Cameras
tip

Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the...

Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the photograph is in focus. If the main subject is in focus but the foreground and background are blurred, the photo is said to have a shallow depth of field. if most of the photo is in focus, including the foreground and background, the photo is said to have a wide depth of field.

Depth of field is controlled by the aperture setting:

- A wide aperture setting (indicated by a low f-stop number) will provide shallow depth of field, resulting in the main subject being in focus and the foreground and background being blurry. This setting is particularly useful when taking portraits or when using a macro lens.

- A narrow aperture setting (indicated by a higher f-stop number) will provide wider depth of field, resulting in the entire photo being in focus. This setting is particularly useful when taking landscape or wide-angle photographs.

The photographs below are examples of how the same subject will photograph using different aperture settings. Note that as the aperture closes, which will allow less light to reach the image sensor, the shutter speed gets faster to produce the appropriate exposure.



shajanrs.jpg

shajanrs_0.jpg

shajanrs_1.jpg

shajanrs_2.jpg

I think you have got a general idea about depth filed. If you have further questions, you can ask me directly. http://www.fixya.com/users/shajanrs






depth of field - what is depth field - how depth field affects picture - how to adjust depth field - DEPTH FIELD - depthfield - DEPTHFIELD
2helpful
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Aperture function

The primary function of the aperture is to control the amount of light passing through the lens. The more light passes through the lens, the less time is required for the proper exposure. A faster exposure can freeze motion and alleviate camera motion, while a longer exposure can allow the subject to blur, conveying a sense of motion.

The aperture also affects the depth of field. A wider aperture narrows the depth of field, causing the foreground and background to blur, while a smaller aperture widens the depth of field, putting more of the scene into focus.

It's up to the photographer to decide which effects to show. Usually for a portrait you'd want the subject's face to be sharp and the background to be blurry. For a landscape, you'd generally want everything from the foreground to the background to be sharp.
2helpful
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Fujifil FinePix S6500fd: How to focus the subject(blur the background)? Like this: http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs604.ash2/155662_1475615262462_1596139557_31044751_765416_n.jpg

What you are asking about is called depth of field. Boiled down, it means that there is a certain amount of area in an image that is in focus, given the focal length of the lens, the aperture (size of the shutter opening) and some other factors. There's a lot of theory behind it, but you just want to know how to accomplish that creative blur behind the subject, right?

If your camera has the capability to choose the aperture, known as the f-stop, either with a manual mode or an aperture-priority mode, then this is pretty easy. The larger the aperture (size of shutter opening) the smaller the depth of field, which means only a small area is in focus. The aperture, or f-stop, is denoted with numbers like F/2.8 or F/8, etc. The lower the number, the bigger the aperture and the more background blur you will get. There is an inverse relation ship between shutter opening and speed, too. A big opening like F2.8 means a faster shutter speed, versus a small opening like F/22. Every lens is different, so your aperture options will vary.

If your camera does not allow you to choose the aperture, it may still have a "scene" setting you can use. A "portrait" or "night" setting usually has a bigger aperture than, say, a "landscape" setting.

Other factors also contribute to creating background blur. All else being equal, the blur increases as you move closer to the subject or as you zoom in on the subject with a zoom lens. Also, having greater space between the background and your subject increases blur.

So, to maximize background blur and create a shallow depth of field, you want to pick the largest aperture possible (smallest f-stop number), you want to get close to the subject and extend your zoom as much as you can, and you want to maximize the distance between the subject and the start of any background objects. Your success will depend in part on your camera and lenses.

If all else fails, you can also artificially create the background blur in software after the image is taken, but that's another story!
2helpful
1answer

How to blur the background in picture taking?

Get another camera :-(

You want to reduce the depth-of-field so that the subject is in focus while the foreground and background are out of focus and blurred. Depth of field (DoF) is dependent on three factors: distance, lens aperture, and lens focal length.

The farther the subject, the deeper the DoF. If you take a picture of a distant mountain peak, the mountain behind that and sunlit the clouds on the horizon will also be in focus. If you get close enough to a flower, you might get the front petals in focus while the petals in the back might blur.

The smaller the lens aperture, the deeper the DoF. Landscape mode, for example, will try to use a smaller aperture in order to get everything in focus while portrait mode will try to use a larger aperture in order to blur the background.

The shorter the lens focal length, the deeper the DoF. This is the killer. Due to the small size of the image sensor, the EX-Z750 has a very short lens: 7.9mm to 23.7mm. Even at the telephoto end of the range, 23.7mm would be considered very wide by film photograpers. A 24mm lens would give film photographers a sharp shot from foreground to horizon and, unfortunately, you're seeing that as well.

Note that the DoF is dependent on the actual focal length, not the 35mm equivalent you may have read about. This is a law of physics, not something that lens designers can easily alter.
0helpful
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PORTRAIT SETTING ON Canon Powershot A710 IS GIVES EXACTLY SAME PHOTO AS ON AUTOMATIC. NEED I ACTIVATE SOMETHING ELSE TO GET A BLURRED BACKGROUND?

Portrait provides extra sharp focus on the subject. It also opens the aperture some, and may in SOME cases give you a blurred backbround depending on the distance of the subject and background to the camera.

If outdoors, consider setting the camera to manual flash so that it will lighten the subject. If indoors, consider turning off the flash. You may need to provide better external lighting on the subject, or use a tripod and ask the subject to hold still during the picture.

Try increasing the zoom (best is to set it to maximum), and then adjust your distance from the subject to get as close as possible. Note that you still might be standing relatively far away because of the zoom.

Another way to experiment further with focus and blurred backgrounds is to use aperture priority (Av) mode on your dial. Use the right/left button to set the lowest "f-number" on your screen. The lower the number, the greater the aperture. All other functions of your camera will automatically compensate. Again, use max zoom in taking closeups with low "f-numbers". Also experiment with the manual focus to pay particular attention to achieving sharp focus on your subjects eyes.

You have a very capable camera. It can do what you're thinking of. You just need to practice with it. It's digital, experiment with the above techniques. Throw away the bad pics and keep the good, noting which technique worked best for the lighting and situation.
0helpful
4answers

P72 face focus blurry background

Hl, I'm not sure what shooting options the P72 has. But, even in Auto you should be able to do this (Auto usually picks a wide aperture). The key is to fill the frame (at least 50%) with your subject. So zoom in and focus on the face and then while 1/2 pressing, zoom back out a little. Then fire away. You should get an in-focus subject and slight blurring of the BG. You have to experiment with this. If you fill the frame too much, you might get such a small depth of field that the subject's nose is in-focus but the eyes aren't.
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1answer

Exposure control options

The following exposure options are available: P (Program auto), A (Aperture priority), S (Shutter priority), and M (Manual). There are five scene programs modes available in which the camera will choose the optimal settings for the picture: - Landscape + Portrait: Suitable for taking photos of both you subject and background. The picture is taken with the background as well as the subject in the foreground in focus. - Landscape: Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. Both the foreground and the background are in focus. Since blues and greens are reproduced vividly in this mode, the landscape mode is excellent for shooting natural scenery. - Portrait: Suitable for shooting a portrait-style image of a person. This mode features an in-focus subject against a blurred background. - Sports: Suitable for capturing fast-moving action such as sports scene or moving vehicles without blurring. - Night scene: Suitable for taking night scene photos with a slower shutter speed.
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Shooting modes

The Shooting modes are as follows: PROGRAM (P)/AUTO Modes Used for general photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. In PROGRAM (P) the brightness (exposure compensation) can be adjusted. In AUTO mode you cannot use exposure compensation or panorama features. Portrait Suitable for taking a portrait-style shot of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Sports Suitable for capturing fast moving action without blurring. Even a fast moving object will appear to be stationary. Landscape Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both the subject and the background. Nightscene + Portrait Suitable for taking photos of your subject in the evening or at night. This setting employs a slow shutter speed, the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture. Landscape + Portrait Suitable for taking photos of both your subject and the landscape. This setting allows for both the foreground subject and background landscape to be in focus. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Self Portrait Enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is locked to wide-angle and cannot be changed. Indoor Optimum settings for taking pictures of family gatherings and groups of friends. This mode reproduces the background clearly capturing the atmosphere. Beach Suitable for taking photos at the beach under a bright blue sky. Colors of the sky, the beach and people are reproduced vividly. Snow Optimun settings for taking pictures where backgrounds are snow fields. Settings are similar to Beach settings and colors of the sky, the greenery and people are reproduced vividly. Fireworks Optimum settings for capturing fireworks in the night sky. Since this setting employs a slow shutter speed , the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture. Sunset Optimum settings for capturing pictures of the setting sun. This mode reproduces reds and yellows vibrantly. Again, this setting employs a slow shutter speed , the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture.
1helpful
1answer

Shooting modes

The Shooting modes are as follows: PROGRAM (P)/AUTO Modes Used for general photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. In PROGRAM (P) the brightness (exposure compensation) can be adjusted. In AUTO mode you cannot use exposure compensation or panorama features. Portrait Suitable for taking a portrait-style shot of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Sports Suitable for capturing fast moving action without blurring. Even a fast moving object will appear to be stationary. Landscape Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both the subject and the background. Nightscene + Portrait Suitable for taking photos of your subject in the evening or at night. This setting employs a slow shutter speed, the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture. Landscape + Portrait Suitable for taking photos of both your subject and the landscape This setting allows for both the foreground subject and background landscape to be in focus. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Self Portrait Enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is locked to wide-angle and cannot be changed. Indoor Optimum settings for taking pictures of family gatherings and groups of friends. This mode reproduces the background clearly capturing the atmosphere. Beach Suitable for taking photos at the beach under a bright blue sky. Colors of the sky, the beach and people are reproduced vividly. Snow Optimun settings for taking pictures where backgrounds are snow fields. Settings are similar to Beach settings and colors of the sky, the greenery and people are reproduced vividly. Fireworks Optimum settings for capturing fireworks in the night sky. Since this setting employs a slow shutter speed , the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture. Sunset Optimum settings for capturing pictures of the setting sun. This mode reproduces reds and yellows vibrantly. Again, this setting employs a slow shutter speed, the camera should be stabilized to avoid camera shake resulting in a blurred picture.
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