Question about Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

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Underexposed, grainy images with a light stripe running down the center

Whenever I take pictures with a flash indoors, the images come back underexposed with a heavy grain and a narrow light colored stripe running perfectly down the center. The stripe is as if a narrow strip were more exposed than the rest of the image. If I take flash pictures outside, the exposure is okay but the stripe is still there, faintly. Bright sunshine pictures are just fine. I checked the flash sync according to instructions (open back, open the aperture, and flash against a white background) and there didn't seem to be a problem. I started having exposure problems a couple of months ago, thought it was a light metering problem and now am having the stripe problem. See http://img131.imageshack.us/my.php?image=61633931647901bc7f9zo6.jpg for an example. Thanks!

Posted by Christopher Ryland on

  • Christopher Ryland Sep 25, 2007

    Thanks for your suggestion. I recently discovered it was user error wrt the flash. I've fixed it now--thankfully not the shutter!

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Anonymous

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Sounds like your shutter curtain is malfunctioning. Did you bump the curtain when u loaded film & bed it... Take a close look to see if it is binding. This is a very fragile area to monkey with & should be done by a qualified repairman

Posted on Sep 22, 2007

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1 Answer

Colour tone issues with Fujifilm Finepix S5700


It sounds like the sepia tone is most likely caused by the tungsten lights in a regular room. Without flash, the only source of illumination indoors is artificial light (unless window light is dominant). There is a way to color balance the camera to approximate sunlight through the manual settings. Look in the menus for "white balance". You'll need to take the camera off of the fully automatic settings first. Move the cursor up or down while looking at the image and you will see the color shift. when you find a color balance you like for that particular room's lighting conditions, hit the OK to lock it in the activated position. Remember to go back to "auto" white balance for most shooting, especially outdoors, or everything will take on a wierd color cast.

Jun 03, 2008 | Cameras

1 Answer

Shutter speed


Did You ever use a SLR back in the stone age when all we had was film?
Film was/is rated with a ISO number, the higher the number the faster the film.
Fast film had fewer and larger grains of silver iodide, (the particles that changed tone, color etc.when exposed to light), therefore it took less light to take a picture.

The down side was a increase in grain. Large grains meant that blow ups, 8x10, 11x14, posters, etc were not as sharp,
as with slow ( low ISO film)
Most outdoor photos had plenty of light so the film had more grains ( high ISO) to capture the available light, and the result was a much sharper image.

Portrait photography used very very slow film ( your 50 ISO setting) but in a studio you had all the artificial lighting you needed, so your portrait came out with very fine detail.

Now the FE-280 does not have a shutter setting, but we can compensate by changing the ISO setting, and the overall effect will be.
Fastest= 1600 ISO for very little light and poorest picture quality.
Slowest=50 ISO for plenty of light and the highest picture quality

200 ISO was the most popular because it worked well outdoors and indoors with a flash, with very good overall picture quality.

400 ISO was a good choice for gloomy days and medium lighting conditions.

Your ISO settings on the FE-280 will have a similar effect.
My best advice is to play around with the different settings until you develop a knack for it, we used to use light meters and a lot of guesswork, quite expensive when you had to buy film and pay for processing.

OK enough history. heres how....
Turn dial to (P) PROGRAMAUTO
Press (MENU)
The camera menu in center is bracketed, Press (OK)
Scroll down one bar on the on screen menu to (ISO)
Press (OK)
Scroll up or down to desired ISO
Press (OK)
TAH DA !

All other functions will be automatic or any other setting that you might choose..
If you change the dial and later go back again to (P) it will retain your selected ISO setting, which is displayed, on screen.

I hope I was help full, and you enjoy some of the special effects that you will now be able try.
By the way... good taste in cameras.
Best regards, Paul

May 18, 2008 | Olympus FE-280 Digital Camera

3 Answers

My snaps are underexposed with 350D camera and 580EX TTL


Set camera:

Single shot mode not servo/C modes
Focus sensor set for center
Make sure exp. comp is not set on -(minus) side.
Make sure your subject is locked on and not moving out of the autofocus (center) sensor.

[email protected]

Jan 02, 2008 | Canon SPEEDLITE 580EX TTL Flash

3 Answers

Taking pictures with low light


on the top dial position to p........ if neer a window during daylight dial to gide and select shooting into backlight then over to fill in flash.........also indoors and portrit with flash helps

Dec 13, 2007 | Olympus SP-510 UZ Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon D50 flash not synchronizing


Ok this is a crappy fix but it works for me.

If your flash isn't syncing correctly make sure your on auto flash. when your flash flips up and you get the beep push the piece that holds the flash just a little forward. and walla your flash syncs up.

Sep 25, 2007 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera with 18-55mm Lens

1 Answer

Exposure problem


If you set your meter based on the white (or substantially white) wall, as per the attachment, I would expect the image to be underexposed.

Sep 14, 2005 | Canon EOS-1D Mark II Digital Camera

1 Answer

Portraits underexposed


Whenever you are taking pictures of people within six feet of them, it is a good idea to turn on the flash - whether you are indoors or out. The Flash mode is easily accessed via the arrow pad on the back of the camera. Press the right arrow key, which has a lightning bolt icon, to enter the Flash Mode. Press the down key to select the lightning bolt icon and press “OK”. The flash will fire every time in this mode. Your outdoor pictures of people should improve in appearance since the flash will fill-in shadows normally apparent in outdoor shots.

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympus D-630 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

Outdoor portraits underexposed


Whenever you are taking pictures of people within six feet of you, it is a good idea to turn on the flash whether you are indoors or out. The Flash mode is easily accessed via the arrow pad on the back of the camera. Press the up arrow key, which has a lightning bolt icon, to enter the Flash Mode. Press the down key to select the lightning bolt icon and press “OK”. The flash will fire every time in this mode. Your outdoor pictures of people should improve in appearance since the flash will fill-in shadows normally apparent in outdoor shots.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia D-435 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Outdoor portraits


Whenever you are taking pictures of people within six feet of them, it is a good idea to turn on the flash whether you are indoors or out. The Flash mode is easily accessed via the arrow pad on the back of the camera. Press the up arrow key, which has a lightening bolt icon, to enter the Flash Mode. Press the down key to select the lightning bolt icon and press “OK”. The flash will fire every time in this mode. Your outdoor pictures of people should improve in appearance since the flash will fill-in shadows normally apparent in outdoor shots.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia D-425 / C-170 Digital...

1 Answer

Pictures are underexposed


When you are photographing scenes with mostly light objects (for example, snow, water, and sand), the picture is usually underexposed (darker than it really is). The camera meter registers the brightness of the scene and tries to set the camera lens and aperture for an exposure based on average brightness levels (18% reflectance) causing it to underexpose, as in the following picture. When you are photographing scenes with mostly dark objects (for example, shade, shadow, and overcast skies), and very few light objects, the camera may overexpose the image, causing it to be too light. If you have a flash on your camera, you can compensate by adding "fill flash" for some extra light. If your camera has an exposure compensation adjustment, you can increase or decrease the exposure to correct for these exposure problems. Increase the number to make the image lighter, and decrease the number to make the image darker. You may want to try a series of shots with different exposure compensation adjustments to get a feel for how much difference these adjustments make.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare CX7530 Digital Camera

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