Question about Singer 1725

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I have never used a sewing machine before!!

Can anyone tell me the basics and how do I thread this thing I have followed the numbers all the way down but I don't know what to do once I get my thread to the needle do I put the thread the the needle first? If so what do I do with it after that? Does it just hang there?

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  • Angel Casper Jun 25, 2007

    what is bobbin? do i need both, thread and bobbin?

  • Sweetone2199 Apr 20, 2008

    I have the top part threaded already, but when i go to do the bobbin, it goes through, but it will not sew on to the fabric. It bunches up and just puts wholes in the fabric where the needle went through. What am i doing wrong?

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  • Master
  • 432 Answers

Yep. Just hangs. Leave about 3 inches of thread.

Posted on Jun 25, 2007

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I got treadle sewing machine, with no manufacturer name on it anywhere. It has a serial number, 2239420. Can anyone tell me how to thread it? I have pictures.


On older Singer machines, the serial number is all you will find. If you look it up in the database, it will tell you what model it is. The good thing is, the old Singer machines didn't change much so the threading sequence should be similar from model to model. It's probably going to be difficult, or impossible, to find a manual, but the machines are so basic that most older Singer manual would be helpful. Just be sure to oil the moving metal parts often with good quality sewing machine oil.

Singer Sewing Machine Company Serial Numbers

May 02, 2018 | Sewing Machines

Tip

Setting Sewing Machine Tensions


When you sew you want a nice sturdy seam, one that won't pull apart or leave gaps or cause puckering. To get this it's important to have the tensions set correctly. Many seamstresses get confused about how to set their tension. It's a fairly simple process once you understand a few basic things.

BASIC LAW OF TENSION to form the stitch: The UPPER thread tension changes the look on the UNDERSIDE of a seam while the BOBBIN tension, the bottom tension effects the appearance of the TOP SIDE of the seam. That is quite opposite of what most people think. Basically what you want is for the top and bobbin tensions to equal so that the stitch forms half way between the two.

If you can see threads from the bottom side of the stitch showing on the TOP side of the seam, like the graphic below, then either the BOBBIN tension is too loose or the TOP tension is too tight.

If there are loops on the bottom side of the seam, like the illustration below, then the TOP thread tension is too loose, or the BOBBIN tension is too tight. Typically the TOP tension is too loose.

If there is puckering on the top side then most likely the TOP tension is too tight, though it may also be the the BOBBIN tension is way too loose.

So how can we tell which it is? The best way its to begin by taking a scrap piece of the fabric you will be sewing on, or at least the same type of fabric, picking the widest zigzag stitch possible with a medium to long length of stitch and sew several inches. Now examine the seam remembering which is the top and which is the bottom. If it does not look identical on both sides then one of the tension settings is wrong. (it is also possible that the needle is the wrong type but for the moment let's assume it's the tension).

If there's a problem with the stitch you can use the above rules to figure out which tension is off. However, as the top and bottom tensions work together let's begin by going through a basic check-off list.

First examine the threading of the upper thread and make sure it is correctly following the path and isn't catching on something. This is really important when you think you've looked through everything and just can't 'see' the problem. Taking the time to go through these steps can save you a lot of pulled hair!

Next pull out the bobbin and examine it in it's case. Are the threads would around it evenly or are they all jumbled and crisscrossed? Jumbled up is a BAD thing. Try a different bobbin that is wound correctly. Now examine if the thread is coming out of the proper place, through the tension slot. Pull on the thread to see if there's total resistant. If so, something isn't right. But it can also be a problem if there is no resistance so let's now do this test.

Suspend the bobbin in it's case by the thread. Let it dangle there is space, still holding it by the thread as if it was a yoyo. It should dangle there with a little slipping, the length of thread between it and your fingers getting a bit longer. If it hits the floor there's no resistance! You have NO tension. That is BAD. Now, while still dangling it gently flick your wrist like you're holding a yoyo and wanting it to drop down a little bit, which is exactly what it should do if the tension is correct. If it doesn't release any thread at all, doesn't drop down a bit then the tension is too tight. Most bobbin tensions are adjusted by turning the little screw on the casing next to where the thread comes out. (Make sure that the bobbin turns in the case the right direction too which is the same direction of the slot!)

If the bobbin drops a lot it is too loose and you will need to tighten it a bit. Remember that a gentle flick should allow more thread to come out but not reel out. There should be some resistance.

Now that we have the bobbin correctly adjusted place it back in the machine and sew another test seam and examine it. By using the rules at the beginning of this tip determine if the upper tension is just right, too loose or too tight. Adjust the upper thread tension accordingly, first raising the pressure foot then turning the dial or however your machine adjusts tension. The higher the number the tighter the tension and vice-versa.

So that you know what the upper tension should feel like pull on the thread at a point BEFORE it goes through the needle first. Pulling after it goes through the needle puts a bit more tension on the thread and I want you to feel the tension before that point. If the tension is too tight and you pull on it after it goes through the needle it may break the needle if it's a small sized needle. You should feel some resistance. You shouldn't have to tug hard on it to pull more thread through but it also shouldn't reel out without any resistance. If the thread is breaking either the tension is very high or the thread is catching somewhere. Check the threading as well as look to see if the spool is turning freely on the spindle. Sometimes the thread will catch on the spool itself. When you buy a new spool of thread remember how the end was through a tiny slot on the side of one end? If that slot is on the bottom of the spool on the spindle it can sometimes catch the thread as it turns. Simply turn the spool upside down and re-thread the machine if needed.

Now once more do a test seam and examine it. Follow the above steps until the top and bottom of the zigzag are identical - perfect!
mszona.jpg

on Jul 01, 2011 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Serger is not stitching


... not quite sure what you mean by "not stitching", here are a few things to check. If the problem is more specific, please leave me a note with more details.
Let's start right from the beginning (for 4-thread overlock/serge):
1. According to the serger manual, ensure that the proper needles are being used. That they are inserted all the way up into their positions and that the flat side of the needle is facing away from you. The left needle will appear to be shorter that the right, that is OK, all is going perfectly.
2. Use four good quality spool of serger thread (good quality sewing thread is fine also) and place them on the spool or cone holders. There should be "little bucket looking things" that fit onto the cone pins to make the cones sit nice and straight, use them. Rattling thread will cause grief.
3. The first thread to be loaded onto the serger is the Upper Looper ...it is the big needle looking thing that swings left to right and back again above the sewing surface. Follow all the threading guided according to your manual, the threading guides are generally coded in a colour specific for this looper. Once the eye of the Upper Looper is threaded, place the thread under the presser foot and to the left. Presser foot down.
4. Next is the Lower Looper, the big needle looking thing that swings left to right and back again under the sewing surface. It can be a bit tricky in some sergers as the thread need to pass to the left and then back to the right under the sewing surface. Your manual should have a good diagram if you can not follow the threading guides on the serger itself. Again the threading guides are generally colour coded with a different colour but specific for the Lower Looper. Once the looper is threaded, it is important that the thread is placed directly OVER the Upper Looper as it comes out of the eye of the Lower Looper. Place the thread now under the presser foot and to the left. Presser foot down.
5. Thread the right needle front to back and place the thread under the presser foot and to the left. Presser foot down.
6 Thread the left needle front to back and place the thread under the presser foot and to the left. Presser foot down.
7. Hold the four thread ends firmly in the left hand and give each thread individually a good pull down over the serger and behind, this will ensure that the threads are all engaged in the tension dials.
8. Set the tensions to the middle number, although this may vary with the brand and model of your serger. If you have the manual check for the correct settings specific to your unit.
9. Set differential to 'normal', or '0' (if your unit has one)
10. Set stitch length to about 2 1/2 to 3.
11. Make sure that the blade is in cutting position. We can trouble shoot blade position later if needed.
12. Make sure that you have the overlocking plate installed ... not the rolled hem plate (if your serger has two plates). Some sergers use the same plate for both functions.
13. Using two layers of medium weight fabric do a test stitch, what is the result? Is a chain forming? Are there stitches on the fabric? Are they looking the way they should?
Hopefully this has helped you, please let me know.
Cheers.

Sep 01, 2014 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Can someone help me with threading my Elna Serger?


A model number would be helpful
Follow the Colour Threading guide on the machine....
Basically......Start with the Loopers (from Right side) finish with needles (Left side)

So....4,3,2,1 in sequence .....1 is first then work to the left

Oct 19, 2011 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Does anyone know of a cam to use in an Elna Carina that makes a stitch very similar to french entredeux? What is the cam number?


I am certain that we demonstrated this stitch with voile or hankerchief linen and using a wing needle and fine silk thread or rayon machine embroidery thread with the turkish hemstitch cam, cam number 140.

For the non heirloom sewers out there entredeaux looks like this.

tally_girl_46.jpg
Here is disc 140in the Elna discs sampler flyer
tally_girl_48.jpg
I am a member of the yahoo newsgroup called "Elna Heirlooms" and the following image was contributed by a member. I believe that members also list any Elna items they may wish to sell.

tally_girl_47.jpg
Or you could contact White sewing centre to order this cam if you don't already have it.
www.whitesewingcenter.com

If you find these images are just too small, feel free to email me on [email protected] and I'll send you the jpgs.

Jul 13, 2011 | Elna 2005 Mechanical Sewing Machine

1 Answer

I need to set the thread tension well, can you tell if the number is higher does that mean the tension is tighter vice versa


Yes, if you set the number higher the tension is higher, but it's not quite as simple as that. Let me give you instructions that work for any machine. I suggest you thread the top with a different color thread than the bobbin-it's easier to see exactly what's going on that way.

Thread your machine with the presser foot UP. The disks that control the tension (threadgoes through them) are tightened up if the foot is down. Change the machine tension with the presser foot DOWN.Because the disks won't be engaged (see above) if the foot is up, the diskswon't move. Start at the middle setting, 3. Go up to tighten, decrease toloosen. Each machine is different, even 2 different machines of the same model.The best thing to do is start at 3 and use a different color in the top andbobbin thread so you can easily see what changes to the tension do to yourstitches. Now use a straight stitch a sew 3 or so inches. Take a lookat the top and bottom of the fabric. You don't want to see any (or at least notmuch) of the other color showing from the other side. Loops on the bottom of the fabric means you need to tighten(increase) your top tension. If you're stitches on the bottom are causingpuckering, then you need to loosen you're top tension. For the most part, youreally don't want to touch your bobbin tension-leave that to a repairtechnician. The factory setting shouldn't be touched except by someone whoreally knows what they're doing. Keep sewing a few inches at a time until you have the resultsyou want. Now you're tension is where you need it!

Jun 02, 2011 | Brother XL3750 Mechanical Sewing Machine

2 Answers

Hobbylock 797 how to thread


The hobbylocks all thread in much the same fashion.  There is a diagram for a four thread hobbylock on this website.  It would be better if you found a Pfaff dealer to show you as it is quite complicated.

 

http://www.pfaffmachines.co.uk/overlock/pfaff-hobbylock-2-overlocker.htm

 

Once you have it threaded, always cut the old threads at the spool and knot new ones on and pull through.  You will have to thread the needles as the knots will not pass through but it does save an awful lot of frustration when needing new colours on the spools.

Mar 28, 2011 | PfaFF Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Thread is going on cutting.


you do need to provide more details.  start here - get a fresh spool of high quality all purpose thread such as Coats and Clarks or Metrosene thread, fill a fresh bobbin, install a new size 11 needle.  Follow the threading instructions even if you've threaded the machine a million times, read the instructions again.  try sewing on some basic cotton fabric.  You'll be able to determine if it's the machine.  Breaking thread can be the thread (it does get too old and fragile), the needle, the incorrect needle for the fabric, the wrong thread for the fabric, and a host of other things.  So try that and tell us more if that doesn't work. 

Dec 27, 2008 | Janome Memory Craft 9000 Computerized...

1 Answer

Thread a kenmore 158 13410????


Not sure if I am too late, but it's pretty basic. I have the same machine...

You have the thread on the spool with the thread on the left side (unrolling off the spool counterclockwise) and put it around the round thing on the front middle (looks like a snap sort of) and through the eye almost right in front of it (the loop) and hold the thread lightly then wrap the thread around the tensioner (the thing with the dial) to the left (counterclockwise) until the springs "pops" it into place. Then run the thread through the little hook thing (by entering from the left) then up to the eye (hole) that is in the little arms that raises and lowers (you might need to spin the wheel to get the arm in the right position) then you run the thread back through the hook thing (entering from the left) around the little half circle thing (by entering from the left) and finally in the hole in the needle...

hope it made sense, I tried to use laymen terms...

good luck!

Mar 21, 2008 | Kenmore 16622 Mechanical Sewing Machine

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