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Rheem ac wiring diagram rcba2457gg14

Unit is always on. what is correct wiring for thermostat?

Posted by Anonymous on

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Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Wiring diagram for Hunter Model 42260

my thermostat has gone in program mode i can not reset it

Posted on May 24, 2008

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Anonymous

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SOURCE: thermostat wiring for second ac unit

I replaced one unite with another and the wires are differance colors the old unites wires are red,purple,yellow,bleck and white the new one have orange,brown,cream,darkpurple,and white

Posted on Aug 02, 2008

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Anonymous

  • 69 Answers

SOURCE: wiring diagram for intertherm ac heating unit

Your best bet is to contact Intertherm and see if you can get the Installation/ owners guide.

Posted on Dec 21, 2008

Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: ac split unit indoor an ouydoor unit electrical wiring diagram

machine off

Posted on Apr 25, 2009

Anonymous

  • 614 Answers

SOURCE: rheem thermostat wiring diagram

The only thing different about a Rheem unit is on the heat pump they use B instead of O. RYGWC all the same.Rus

Posted on Jul 16, 2009

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Honeywell smart thermostat. model th9320wf5003ww


Assuming the only change to your heating system is the t-stat and it was installed by you, there are a couple things you may want to check: Double check the wiring to be sure all wires are secure and that they are in the correct terminal. Always go by what the wire controls. I never assume the colors are correct.
Verify that the programmed settings are correct, especially the type of heating/cooling system and the stages.

Jan 03, 2018 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

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Thermostat installation


1. Make sure you buy the correct thermostat for your application. 2. Always turn off power to unit before installation. You will blow fuse or a transformer.3. Mark all wires when you take them loose from old thermostat.4. On some thermostats you will have RH and RC you must place jumper between them to get heat and cool to work.....

on Mar 25, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

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Thermostat Wiring and Terminal Designations Part 2


There is a lot of confusion about terminal designations and thermostat wiring. There are no official standards for wiring colors, or even terminal designations for that matter. To be sure it’s always best to refer to your equipment manufactures wiring diagrams to see how their terminals are meant to be used.

As you can see in Part 1 the most common colors are the red, white, green, and yellow. These four colors are almost always associates with the same terminals. If you have any more wires than that you may have any number of combinations, depending on what the tech decided when they installed your unit. There is no right or wrong way to do anything. As long as the same wire is connected to the same terminals of the two pieces that they are running to and from, then the wiring is correct. It is up to YOU to verify and not just guess at what the installer was thinking.

It is always advisable to make sure that the power is off when working with electricity. Also when checking wiring and even as a good practice when working with your low voltage wiring, always install an automotive ATC fuse holder at the hot side of the transformer secondary. (Load side) This will protect the transformer in case you accidentally short it out.

I need to make sure that I give this caution. Please if you are not familiar with electric and wiring, do not attempt to work on your unit alone. Find someone that is comfortable in their ability to work with electricity. It is very easy to do more harm than good and even experience technicians make mistakes at times. Use every caution and work very methodically and carefully. Haste makes waste!!!

on Dec 12, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Replacing double pole 220 v with honewell ct410a two wire120/140v wiring diagram not clear


1 power wire (120v) will go to the thermostat and 1 power wire (120v) will go directly to the unit. The other wire on the unit will go to the other side of the thermostat. The safety precaution behind using a single pole to replace a double pole contactor is that you will always have 1 leg of power going to the unit. Many systems are designed like this from the factory, but it is always better to have a 2 pole to cut all power off to the unit unless it's in operation. The unit will still not work as long as it does not have both legs of power.
L1 to Thermostat T1 to Unit
L2 and T2 wired together.

This is only for 240v systems. 120v Will have 1 common and 1 power, therefore you will need to know which wire is which. Power to thermostat, common wired direct.

Nov 26, 2013 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

1 Answer

How to turn hunter thermastat model 44134 on


This question needs to be reclassified with aftermarket programmable home thermostats--not fans.

Hunter 44134

Getting the wiring connections correct to the terminals in the back plate is essential. Understanding better which colored wires do what functions for your particular brand and model of HVAC gear proves essential, too: "That's the rub!"

Unlike the brilliant and wisely-instituted electrical code, a sensible common "code" for HVAC thermostat wires doesn't exist--each brand, and many models represented by such brands--may have their own peculiar wiring color conventions. HVAC techs also have noted the increasing numbers of brands and models in the market these days, as well--thus, they too may resort to online help threads concerning such issues. (Certainly, the wiring conventions for heat pumps differs also from that of a conventional heat/air setup.)

Unfortunately, many of Youtube's demonstrations from HVAC pros prove merely general info concerning HVAC systems--these may prove somewhat useful: Being merely general info, they're often not specific enough always for particular units, though. (This proves keenly true concerning thermostat wiring.)

Always switch off the circuit breaker for your HVAC system before proceeding with wiring. My system is a Goodman heat pump--it uses a five-wire thermostat setup: The 44134 model from Hunter doesn't feature a terminal in the back plate for the "C" wire for that. (The blue wire from my Goodman heat pump is the "Comm" or "C" wire--that's very confusing in it's own way--the "B" terminal on the back plate for the 44134, and most other programmable thermostats, often is used with B-coded wires for other manufacturers' HVAC units--generally, "B" wires for such units are blue, as well--beware of reliance upon wiring colors!)

Hunter's FAQs clearly indicate that the "C" wire connection isn't always necessary, nor appropriate, for their thermostats--their 44134 is one isn't an exception. I twisted on a small, gray wirenut onto end of my blue Comm wire, further securing that better with electrical tape. (Simply wrapping the Comm wire well with electrical tape should prove also sufficient.)

Unless you know your system's peculiar wiring very well (that is, you're likely an HVAC tech), don't try to connect a Comm wire to another terminal on the back plate for the 44134--you'll likely ruin your thermostat (perhaps along with some other HVAC electronics): You may need then to get an HVAC tech out, after all!

As indicated above, don't merely "match" wiring colors (as a woman might for interior decorating or remodeling)!: This proves a continuing and overly common, comical mistake! Prove instead somewhat skeptical of thermostat wiring colors! A Biblical scripture applies: "Be as wise as serpents!" Take your time to get wiring connections right!

I've noted that the 44134 unit relies totally upon 2 AA batteries (not supplied in the package)--those must be in good working order and oriented correctly--otherwise, your thermostat and HVAC system won't function. Furthermore, the control unit may be easily removed from the back plate--thus allowing "easy-chair" configuration--again, HVAC and fan functions will halt immediately--the connected unit proves necessary for continued function.

Hunter also points out (on their packaging as well) that the 44134 (and, many other (if not all) Hunter thermostats) won't work with baseboard heating systems. Hunter's site FAQs prove too sparse--some may prove keenly useful, nonetheless.

I can't yet get my heat pump system to work with Hunter's "always on" fan switch setting--the rightmost "Auto/On" setting for that bottom-mounted switch at the right. Perhaps a jumper wire proves necessary in the back plate terminals--somewhere. (I've noted this also for Hunter's common 44277 model, as well.) I glean perhaps that somehow invoking the "G" terminal proves necessary. As usual, investigation proves warranted.

Definitely note the "Cool, Off, Heat" switch on the bottom left of the unit: Yeah, that's all too easy to forget. The Hunter 44134 doesn't provide any feature allowing automatic switching between heating and cooling--one must choose which function for the thermostat to control. If the switch is set to "Heat," cooling isn't possible--and, vice-versa.

For reference and troubleshooting, keep the manual and install instructions in a safe, memorable, and easily accessible place. Hunter does provide PDF manual versions online--installation instructions prove lacking online though--they're not in the user manual, either. Unfortunately, Hunter doesn't upgrade it's PDF manual versions.

I glean that Honeywell units may prove generally more easily configurable than Hunter units. Nonetheless, configuring Hunter units proves far from impossible, though. Configuring Hunter thermostats prove perhaps not as "intuitive.": The formal user manuals provided by Hunter thus may prove more keenly necessary for their thermostats' configuration.

Getting personal help online from Hunter may prove somewhat difficult (that may have changed recently). A few years ago, I called customer support: A woman answered my wiring question very satisfactorily. (I noted a jumper wire connect to the terminals of my old manual thermostat--she indicated that the jumper proves unnecessary in Hunter units.) Hunter phone support hours prove somewhat limited--they're similar to traditional office hours.

As with most programmable thermostats, the Hunter is a PRC (Chinese)-fabricated general-purpose consumer circuitry device. As such, it's (overly) intended to be wired and configured by the user to provide correct function for many particular and compatible HVAC brands/models. Given the particular installation that may perhaps prove difficult. Given the general-purpose nature of such thermostats, a simple installation sheet of instructions can't always offer sufficient and correct answers.

Without the particulars of your HVAC system and thermostat wiring, it proves very difficult in some cases for Fixya and other DIY sites to provide correct answers. (Most DIYers ultimately do succeed with install and use of programmable thermostats, though.)

"Proust" thanks you for getting this far!: Perhaps some of my particular solutions here do prove useful to some of you--more nit-picking, detailed work and anecdotes (intended for specific brands and models) needs to be offered in this area....

Mar 17, 2013 | Dryers

Tip

How to Trouble shoot Low Voltage Controls on AC-Heat


What I have always been told is if your 24 volt side burns out check the high volt side if the hi volt side burns out check the low volt side.

A quick way if the primary side is burning out due to a problem with the low volt side:
1* Mark all the thermostat wires at the indoor unit.
2* Disconnect them at the indoor unit.
3 Check main line voltage before proceeding (A on electric furnaces, 208 volt is not considered 220V and 240v Is not considered 208V. In these circumstances the voltage may have changed with the power company replacing a transformer and now you need to change the main power input lines at your control transformer for the correct operating voltage). If OK then proceed:

4 If you have an amp meter attach it to one of the lines going to the transformer.
5 Apply main power and listen for hum, note if smell starts again and if so problem has to be in board or main incoming voltage too high or too low. Amp draw should be less than 3 amps.
6 If your to this point and still haven't found any trouble in the above as of yet, Connect the wire marked "C" together. Then just touch the thermostat wires one at a time to the places where they go on the indoor unit and watch the amp meter. If you don't see the meter jump the circuit is probably OK but leave them disconnected until you touch all of them to the correct place or wire. Here is a possible problem I have seen a thermostat wiring problem if the wires are stripped too far and a "whisker" of the wire sticks out and allows one of the other wires to cross short out. In this case just cut off the excess wire or bend it over out of the way and continue with the test. You can always cut it off later after the tests. If you see the meter jump up and stay up and /or blows the fuse the wire that you used and it blew is where to concentrate.

(* you may need to reattach the wires at the indoor section then disconnect them at the Thermostat and then at the out door unit if you have not discover the cause at this point or after finding the wire(s) that cause the Spike on the AMP meter. Just take your amp meter with you and reconnect the "R" wire first and check it first. after that if nothing shows at each place connect the "R" back and proceed with touching each other wire individually while amp reading the "R" wire).

7 No wiring problem found means that you could have a relay or contactor not pulling in properly.
and this will cause the amp draw to go way over the transformers power out put or VA rating.
8 Inspect the thermostat wiring for the "whisker" I mentioned above.
9 If you have done this to the end of the thermostat wires and your main incoming voltage is correctly wired in on the transformer and your relays and contactors are pulling in evenly and not delaying excessively your problem should be fixed.

If this helps you please rate me as high as you can and thank you for using fix ya.

on Apr 25, 2009 | GE APH10AA Air Conditioner

1 Answer

I am replacing an old Lennox thermostat with a new Lux DMH110 digital thermostat. My furnace(oil) has only two wires on the thermostat(heat only). I connected the wires according to directions of new...


Make sure on the furnace that you have the same colored wires connected at the thermostat to R and W. Check for good connections at both locations. You can always test to make sure the unit fires by crossing the two wires together. If the unit fires, you have a bad thermostat.

Feb 17, 2010 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

1 Answer

Thermostat runs aux. heat all the time


sounds like a wiring issue to me

either there are wires going to the wrong terminals on the t.stat, or there is a physical problem with 1 or more wires somewhere

it is also possible that the new thermostat will not correctly control the unit that you are trying to operate. Unfortunately, just because it has all the right color terminals, does not always mean that they all operate the same.

Good Luck!

Feb 11, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Installing 1 1/2 ton Weatherking Heatpump and ADP WAK351807P2 air handler 1 /1/2 with 7.5KW back up heat kit. Can't seem to get the thermostat hooked correctly. I understand the Weather King product...


O energizes the reversing valve when the thermostat is set for COOL. B energizes the reversing valve when the thermostat is set for HEAT.
The O/B is usually a orange or black wire.
You can't hurt anything if you choose O or B incorrectly. Hook one of them up and run the unit. If set for COOL and the unit runs cool inside it is correct. If set for COOL and the unit runs warm inside it is not correct.
If the inside temp is opposite from your setting change the wire to the other terminal.
Remember to disconnect power from the air handler when changing thermostat wires.
The defrost control board on the outside unit should be marked correctly for O or B.
Your thermostat may have a slide switch rather than a separate terminal.

Oct 30, 2009 | Weather King 10AJA6001AH Air Conditioner

1 Answer

CARRIER AIR CONDITIONER/HEAT PUMP PROBLEM WOULD NOT RESPOND TO THERMOSTAT. UNIT IS AT LAKE HOUSE WHERE WE DO HAVE BAD STORMS. IN CHECKING, INSIDE PART OF UNIT HAD BURNED UP THE TRANSFORMER BUT NOT...


what I have always been told is if your 24 volt side burns out check the high volt side if the hi volt side burns out check the low volt side.

A quick way if the primary side is burningout due to a problem with the low volt side:
1 MArk all the thermostat wires at the indoor unit
2 Disconnect them at the indoor unit.
3 Check main line voltage before proceeding (A 208 volt is not considered 220V and 240v Is not considered 208V> In these circumstances the voltage may have changed with the power company replacing a transformer and now you need to change the main power input lines at your control transformer for the correct operating voltage). If okj then proceed:

4 If you have an amp meter attach it to one of the lines going to the transformer.
5 Apply main power and listen for hum, note if smell starts again and if so problem has to be in board or main incoming voltage too high or too low. Amp draw should be less than 3 amps.
6 If your to this point and still havent found any trouble in the above as of yet, Connect the wire marked "C" together. Then just touch the thermostat wires one at a time to the places where they go on the indoor unit and watch the amp meter. If you donmt see the meter jump the circut is probably ok but leave them disconnected until you touch all of them to the correct place or wire. Here is a possible problem I ahve seen a thermostat wireing problem if the wires are stripped too far and a "whisker" of the wire sticks out and allowes one of the other wires to cross short out. In this case just cut off the excess wire or bend it over out of the way asnd continue with the test. You can always cut it off later after the tests. If you see the meter jump up and stay up and /or blowes the fuse the wire that you used and it blew is where to consentrate.
7 No wiring problem found means that you could have a relay or contactor not pulling in properly.
and this will cause the amp draw to go way over the transformers power out put or VA rating.
8 Inspect the thermostat wiring for the "whisker" I mentioned above.
9 If you have done this to the end of the thermostat wires and your main incomming voltage is correctly wired in on the transformer andf your relays and contactors are pulling in evenly and not delaying excessively your problem should be fixed.

If this helps you please rate me as high as you can and thank you for using fixya.

Apr 24, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

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