Question about Creek 5350SE Amplifier

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Losing sound, hearing scratchy noise from the speakers

Right after turning on the switch, I hear scratchy noise from the speakers intermittently. Losing sound output, reduce in output level occurs also. This happens on both channel, but left side seems to be worse. I have had a retailer look at twice with no success. They could not find anything wring. I sent the unit to a retailer in L.A. who was recommended by MusicHall. They also could not recreate the problem. When I touched the metal case, it sometimes fix it. So, I guess there may be a solder crack somewhere. Has anyone had a similar problem and found a solution ? Thanks,

Posted by Mike Higashikawa on

  • cdvibes Aug 18, 2008

    i have behringer EP1500 when i switch on the amp only and leave for about 3 minutes i hear a scratching sound coming from the left channel whats wrong.

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11 Answers

Bram v Eijsden

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I think I had the same problem with the DSP-A1000. The problem is probably dust in the CD/Tuner/etc switch. After checking all the connectors and wires in the machine and cleaning and contact spraying them, the problem still persisted. I found however thad by putting pressure at the printplate above the CD/Tuner/etc switch,I could reproduce the problem(make the noice louder/less loud). I took the switch out and cleansed it inside and outside with contact spray. turned the switch a couple of times, let it dry, et voila, problem solved! good luck! gr, Bram

Posted on Dec 15, 2006

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This description was copied from a description of the Creek 5350SE. `The circuit consists of a passive input stage and volume control which then feed the power amplifier section. It is possible to make this pre-amp section an active device by adding a gain module'. This sounds like an old problem with volume controls which are essentially, a potentiometer. If there is absolutely no voltage on the slider of the potentiometer then no noise is generated, and amplified. In your case a voltage is generated when you power up from your input devices, such as a record player or cd player or mixer unit. The retailer in LA could not recreate the problem as he may not have had the same audio set-up. Try to isolate the input by not connecting the other units, and switch on to test. If you find the culprit unit you will find it has a DC voltage on its output on switch on, which dies away slowly. Touching the metal case is a way of discharging this voltage build up, and you should also make sure the units metalwork are connected, with extra wires. If you can make the pre-amp section an active device by adding the gain module this will most likely cure the noise problem. If the output speakers protection relay circuit, inhibit time can be increased by adjustment this would mask the effect, which is what its for.

Posted on Oct 20, 2006

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Anonymous

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My yamaha tuner does this every few months. POwering down the receiver and rapidly turning it to full volume then no volume a dozen times clears the contacts on the volume potentiometer. The problem always goes away for another couple of months.

Posted on Apr 27, 2007

Pieter Vleeshouwers

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Contact spray to use in long ridge switches for input selection
potentiometers , look the solderings especially on active components with heatsink , if you have an older amplifier its good to further draw after a bit the screws on the mounting of the output transistors coldspray if somewhere are 1n4001 diodes are used replace them with the 1n4004 or 1n4007

Posted on Nov 21, 2016

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Can you confirm for me what is your amp? is it Yamaha? what model please

Posted on Mar 19, 2008

Anonymous

I encountered exactly the same problem on my setup: Alesis Masterlink ML9600 directly hooked to a Yamaha P5000S. I can hear little sparkling sounds and the output volume is very loud. When connecting my mixer (Mackie 1642 VLZ-III) or my digital mutlitrack recorder (Yamaha AW1600), this problem is absent. Actually, when thinking about it, I believe that it's obvious that a preamp should be place in-between the CD player and the power amp. I consider adding a very simple preamp, like a Rotel RC-06. Effe

Posted on Oct 08, 2007

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It seem to be the cold solder on the Gain Stage circuit. It build up a lot of heat when the unit is on. The Gain Stage is below the input relays. Both channel need to re-touch all the solder points.

Posted on Aug 24, 2007

Anonymous

Check the outputs with a multimeter and look for voltage leaks

Posted on Jun 01, 2007

Anonymous

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I had the same problem you need to get the selcter switch replaced as they had problems with some of the batch of swicthes once you get a replacement fron yamaha you will have no problems

Posted on Feb 24, 2007

Anonymous

Azuma I hope that you are still checking back to this post. I have the same piece of equipment with the same problem. I suspect that both of us have leaky capacitors. I have heard more than once that Krell has this problem. Some capacitors are "self-healing" when the dielectric starts to break down, which explains the intermitant part, but once they start, they only get worse. Check out the web site stereorepair.net. Larry

Posted on Jan 25, 2007

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Im surprised the techs did not find it, as it sounds like poor connections in the speaker safety relay. It really shound be replaced. Good Luck PS please dont forget to rate this thread.

Posted on Oct 19, 2006

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Anonymous

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SOURCE: scratchy noise on my record player

Sounds like its time to change the needle [Stylus ] , there are a few types But the two most common are Saphire and Diamond Stylus pay the extra and get a diamond if you can , Hope this helps

Posted on Jun 01, 2009

Anonymous

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SOURCE: Creek 5350SE amplifer left Channel dead

It's the ribbon cable that is likely at fault. There are actually three computer type ribbon cables in the amp. I believe the cable that is responsible for the drop-out of a channel is the widest (longest) of the three, but you really need a tech to look at it and replace the cable. But please note that the new cable may also have defects in manufacture and that it may take some time to order a new cable from Creek. I had a tech solve the problem permanently by removing all three ribbon cables and then hard-wiring the connections together - that is to say, point-to-point wiring. My cost was about $250, but as you can imagine, there is extensive labor involved. Good luck!

Posted on Aug 13, 2009

Grubhead

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SOURCE: Creek SE 5350 one channel without sound

I think you will find that the fault is either a dry joint somewhere (have you moved it recently?) OR more likely a transistor. It might be caused by one getting very hot! Thus shutting down and coming back on when cool.
The best way to track this troublemaker down is to spary each transistor (in the left channel only don't bother with the other or Power section) with Servisol Freezer spray. Wait for the thing to play up then spray -one at a time- if it pops on you have got the bugger! To make certain apply a soldering to it and it should act up again. Spray again to confirm.

Posted on Apr 12, 2010

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Can't be fuses, as it comes back on!

Questions:-
i) Does it go off when run continuously with volume controls at zero?
(this checks whether the audio output level is causing a problem).

ii) When the unit does operate, is the sound good on both speakers?

iii) Does the fault occur more when outdoors (wind noise tripping the power protection). If so, reduce the low freq EQ setting.

iii) Do the EQ lights flutter when the fault occurs?

This fault has been reported on the Escort 3000 too, see link
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suggesting this may need a 'electronic modification' to put it right.

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Feedback is a sharp, loud noise that can come through the earphones of a headset unexpectedly---it occurs when the headset is getting sound (feed) from someone else speaking or playing music into a microphone. This sound can create a dangerous situation for someone who is operating expensive equipment or flying a plane at the time since it can disable hearing temporarily.
If you experience feedback often, it could also lead to serious hearing problems.

Mic Too Close to the Speaker or Volume Too High
The main cause of a feedback sound in a headset is proximity to a speaker. If a person holding a microphone on the other end gets too close to a speaker, it creates a loop of re-amplified sound that results in the loud, screeching noise. When the volume on the other party's microphone is too high, it is more vulnerable to picking up unwanted noise and feedback from speakers and sound output devices in the room. So make sure that you ask the other party to turn down the microphone to a normal level and stay far from speakers. b> Two Microphones Gathering Same Sound b> When the other party places two microphones too close to each other, it could cause feedback. When positioned toward the sound source (such as a person speaking) the microphones will both pick up the same audio and compete with each other when creating the output of sound, causing a sharp noise in your headset. This problem, called acoustic phase interference, is resolved by simply ensuring that the other party uses one microphone at a time. Poor-Quality Headset or Microphone b> One common cause of feedback is simply a poor-quality headset or microphone. Most modern headsets and microphones have noise-canceling features that manage and kill feedback before it has a chance to occur. These noise-canceling headsets are essential for pilots and aviation crew members. If you hear sudden feedback that is strong enough to hurt your ears, the headset or microphone is simply not properly equipped to actively cancel that unwanted noise before it hits your ears. Buy a higher-quality noise-canceling headset to manage the feedback noise when you're going about your tasks. Hope this helps.

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"Noise", as used in this document, is a general term referring to any sound a speaker system makes that is not part of the original source material. There are many different types and sources of noise, each with its own solution. Below is an explanation of the common types of noise, what causes them, and how to minimize their occurrence.
Hum or Buzz
There are four common causes of humming and buzzing:
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    Z-640 (4 channel sound card): Depress the Matrix button.
    Z-680 (2 or 4 channel sound card): Disconnect the unused input cables from the control pod
  3. High-power devices If you are using other high powered devices on the same electrical circuit, they may be causing hum or buzz. If so, discontinue their use while you are using your speaker system. Examples of such devices include microwave ovens, halogen lamps, power tools, etc. Also note that high-power devices with dimmer switches (such as halogen torchiere lamps) will cause an especially pronounced buzzing effect. To minimize hum or buzz, make sure that the dimmer switch on these products is either all the way on or off.
  4. Electric Polarity In many countries, the US being one, the electrical power grid is polarized. In these countries, the power plugs are designed so they can only be inserted into the wall socket in a single direction. For example, in the US one of the plug blades is larger than the other. To avoid humming and buzzing, both your computer and speaker system must be properly plugged into polarized outlets. If your wall outlets do not have polarized plugs, as in the case of many older homes, and you are using adapters to plug these power cords into the wall, it is possible that the polarity of either your computer or your speaker system is reversed. In many other countries, such as most of the European continent, wall sockets are not polarized at all - making it even more difficult to properly match the computer and speaker system. To solve the problem you will need to remove the power plug from the wall outlet, rotate the plug 180°, and re-insert it into the wall. Try this for your speaker system power cord, your computer power cord, or both. You should be able to find a combination that will eliminate the humming and buzzing.
Pops and Clicks
There are three main causes of pops and clicks:
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  2. Multi-tasking If you are running more than one program on your computer that accesses the sound system at the same time, small pops and clicks can be common. This is a function of your computer and/or sound card. A common example is using a program that generates occasional audio feedback (such as beeps or other sound effects) while listening to an MP3 track in the background. The solution is to turn off audio feedback in the first application so that the background MP3 track is uninterrupted.
  3. Interrupts in the Digital Bitstream On digital systems, such as the Z-680, it is normal to hear a very faint "tick" when you switch between inputs (by pressing the input button). You may also hear louder 'clicks' or 'pops' on a device such as a standalone DVD player or a sound card if it is plugged into one of the digital inputs. On some systems, this noise may occur when skipping tracks, switching audio streams (for example, from Dolby Digital to DTS), or navigating a DVD menu. The clicks and pops occur because the device is sending out an interrupted digital data stream. This behavior generally occurs with older software and older players, but is uncommon on most modern equipment. The Z-680 has been extensively tested with the latest sound cards, software DVD players, and standalone DVD and CD players. If you experience extensive popping and clicking, we suggest upgrading to the latest version of your software DVD player or, if using a stand alone device, trying a different speaker model. If you need more assistance with this issue, please contact Customer Support.
Stutter
A stuttering sound track is an indication of either insufficient or conflicting computer resources. Check to make sure that your computer has sufficient processor power and memory to handle the applications you are running, especially if you are using a software DVD player. Defragmenting your hard drive may also help. If you are sure you have sufficient resources, check to make sure that you don't have any conflicting IRQ or DMA channels.
We have also seen some software DVD player/sound card combinations that cannot properly output a Dolby Digital or DTS signal through the sound card's S/PDIF digital connector. (S/PDIF is a generic term for either coax or optical digital connections.) The result, when using a Z-680 hooked up to a S/PDIF connector, is a stuttering soundtrack. As mentioned, this stuttering is caused by the computer, not the Z-680 speakers. Switching the software DVD player's sound output to the 5.1 analog outputs will generally solve this problem.
Hiss
All high-powered amplification devices - everything from multimedia systems to home theater systems to movie theater sound systems -- generate some level of background noise, or hiss. In addition, low quality sound cards with poor signal-to-noise ratios can generate a significant amount of steady hiss that is reproduced on the speakers. Under normal conditions at a normal listening distance, the hiss coming from the sound system should not be noticeable. In a very quiet room, or if you place your ear very close to the speaker, you may hear a very low level hiss. This is normal, but should be completely masked by normal music and game sounds.
If you find that hiss is noticeable, it is likely that the speakers are too close to your listening position. If the speakers are too close, you will not obtain the best imaging of the sound and you risk damage to your hearing when the system is playing at full power levels. Try moving the speakers further away from your normal listening position. We recommend at least 18" for the moderately-powered systems (such as Z-340, Z-540, and Z-640) and at least 30" for higher-powered systems (such as the Z-560 and Z-680).
Also, note that the satellites in most Logitech speaker products are designed to be wall-mounted. Wall mounting the speakers provides two benefits: 1) it moves the of the satellites further away from your listening position, making any hiss less noticeable and 2) it moves all of the satellites further away from each other, providing better channel separation and surround sound spatialization.

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