Question about Olympus D-535 Zoom / C370 Zoom Digital Camera

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Focussing My Olympus D-535 has trouble focussing. At the moment only about i in 4 photos are in focus. As the button is depressed the auto focus can be seen working. It often goes into focus and then loses it again.

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Two possible solutions. The camera may be set to Macro. The lens may have failed. If the camera is not set to macro then the lens has to be replaced and the camera reprogrammed.

Posted on Mar 25, 2007

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How to make Olympus 14-45 zoom manual focus when not on camera?


How on Earth is it going to focus when there is nothing to tell it what it is focusing on ?

Jul 27, 2017 | Olympus Video Cameras

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2 problems. I have the Coolpix L100. Sometimes my photos are blurry and also. there is a delay when I snap a photo which isnt good when trying to get action photos.


With autofocus digital cameras, blurred photos are almost always a result of camera shake. You need to hold the camera still even after pressing the button, as there is often a short delay before the shutter fires.

Many digital cameras have a two-stage shutter press- first pressure causes the camera to focus, then the follow through pressure takes the picture. If you are rushing this, you may get unfocussed shots.

If you take lots of action pictures, you will have to work on a technique of partially pressing the shutter to get focus in anticipation of the shot (perhaps focussing on where the action will occur), then holding it part-pressed until the moment you want to capture. This is really no more of a problem than setting an anticipatory focus on a manual focussing film camera use to be. Some more complex digital cameras will allow you to turn off auto focus and focus manually.

Nov 05, 2010 | Nikon COOLPIX L100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I dont understand the depth of feid button


Depth of field is one of the most useful creative controls on any camera.

It enables you to see how any given aperture setting will affect how much of your photographic scene will be in sharp focus. Aperture settings don't just affect how much light enters the lens, they determine how much of the scene in front of and behind the subject which you've focussed on will also be in focus. The distance between the nearest object in sharp focus and the most distant is called the depth of field.
Wide open apertures (i.e. lowest numbers) give you the shallowest depth of field and vice-versa.

Modern cameras always show the image in the viewfinder or LCD using the lens aperture wide open, regardless of what you've actually set: this allows maximum light into the lens to allow you to clearly see the scene and the lens only close down to the correct aperture at the moment that you press the shutter. The depth of field button (more correctly called the depth of field preview button) enables you to close down the aperture to what it's actually been set to so that you can see exactly what is in sharp focus; when you press it the scene will darken as there will be less light entering the camera, but if you look at a foreground or background subject which is out of focus before you press the button you'll notice that it becomes sharper when you activate the preview. The button will not have any effect at all if you have the lens set to it's maximum (lowest number) aperture, as the aperture that you're viewing the scene at is identical to the one you're taking the photo at.

Understanding depth of field and how you can manipulate it is vital to taking stunning photos:-

Say you want to take a photo of a bee on a flower: if you leave the camera set to auto, or select a medium to small aperture then the photo will show the bee, the flower, and everything in front and behind making a confusing and busy shot. If you select a wide open aperture then the bee will be in sharp focus (if you're really close, maybe only it's head), the flower, or parts of it will be in sharp focus, and the foreground and background will blur out making the bee and the flower the most important compositional elements in your shot.

Alternatively, you may be in a situation where you need to lift your camera quickly and take a shot without disturbing the subject. You don't know exactly how far away your subject will be, but you know it will be between, say, five feet and twenty feet. If you use your camera as normal, you'll see the shot, lift the camera to your eye, wait for focus (if using an autofocus camera, it might not even focus on what you intend). By the time the shutter has activated the moment has passed or the subject has seen or heard you and gone. Using depth of field you can manually prefocus to a point about a third of the way into your d.o.f. (in this case, ten feet) and select the correct aperture to give you a fifteen foot d.o.f. The setting varies with the lens, but you'll almost always get away with f8). When you see the right shot you just lift the camera and fire without worrying about focus and if you've done so correctly your subject will be sharply focussed. Of course, you could set the lens to minimum aperture, but this can result in the shutter speed being too low for the light conditions and causing unsharpness due to movement of the subject or your camera.

The technique is known as hyperfocal focussing and it explains why some lenses have various markings on them in various colours with aperture numbers next to them, they're a simple depth of field calculator for any given aperture setting. I'd provide a link but it's better if you search yourself as some sites go into what may be far too much detail about the subject.

Hope this has helped you, all that I ask in return is that you take a moment to rate my answer. If there's anything which you want me to clarify further then add a comment to my answer and I'll return as soon as I can to assist you some more.

Jan 30, 2010 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Blurred Images with Olympus E520


When operating any digital camera, the camera tries to capture the best focus and exposure for that particular scene. By pressing the shutter button half-way down, the focus and exposure is being set. There will be a green circle on the upper left hand corner of the screen, then your camera is ready to take the picture. Slowly depress the shutter the rest of the way down to take the picture.

Mar 23, 2009 | Olympus Zuiko 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Digital ED...

1 Answer

EOS 30D is slow to fire.


Are you sure you aren't in the delay setting in drive mode? This camera has 2 delay settings, one for 2 seconds between when you press the shutter and when it takes the photo, and one with 10 seconds delay - often used when you want to be in the photo (e.g. self-portrait or group photo).

If you aren't in the delay mode, then I need to know more about your settings. What shooting mode are you using? What type of photo are you trying to take (portrait, landscape, sports)? Are you shooting indoors, outdoors, bright sunlight, overcast, etc.?

Dec 30, 2008 | Canon EOS 30D Digital Camera with 18-55mm...

1 Answer

Focus with polarizing filter


No, the problem is not with the lens. Your Canon camera requires unpolarized light to focus. Even on manual focus, you may have trouble seeing focus through the viewfinder. That's why they invented circular polarizer.

Sep 29, 2008 | Canon EF 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 DOIS USM Lens

1 Answer

Olympus C-765 does not focus


Dear Benjamin,

I also own an olympus c765 and was wondering how to use the manual focus option when I came across your post. Actually I have been wondering whether manual focus is of any use in an olympus c765 because the manual does not talk anything about it.
However, I just found out that there is a way of activating/deactivating manual focus. Here it goes:
1. Turn the camera on
2. Switch to any mode - portrait/landscape etc
3. Press and hold the 'OK' button on the centre for a second until you see a MF/AF option on the screen
4. Switch to MF and focus on any subject by pressing the up/down keys.

Most likely, your camera has been turned to Manual Focus option, which is why it is not focussing any more. Follow the steps above and turn it back to Auto Focus option and let me know if your problem gets solved.

Regards

Aug 30, 2008 | Olympus Camedia C-765 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Not Focussing


sir,i think this is not focusing problum, u see any optic mois or finger prints ?u first clean this

Mar 04, 2008 | Olympus Camedia D-425 / C-170 Digital...

1 Answer

Focus on a particular subject?


If the camera is having trouble doing an auto focus you can try the FOCUS LOCK feature. This feature allows you to focus on another subject roughly the same distance away from you, and then move the camera back to your original subject and take your picture without losing that focus. First turn the camera on and locate the AutoFocus Target Mark in the center of the LCD. The AF Target Mark resembles an open and close bracket [ ]. Position this AF Target Mark on a subject roughly the same distance away from you as the subject that the camera is having trouble focusing on. Press the shutter button halfway enabling the lens to focus. While keeping the shutter button pressed halfway, move the camera back to include the subject you originally wanted in the image, then press the shutter fully. (Please see page 42 in the D-535 Zoom Reference Manual in Section 3, under the heading titled “If Correct Focus Cannot Be Obtained”, for a more detailed explanation.)

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus D-535 Zoom / C370 Zoom Digital...

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