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Question about Samsung Digimax i6 PMP Digital Camera

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Overly white pictures

When I take pictures they come out very white. Only when I film the colors are normal. I've already checked the white balance adjuster, but this doesn't seem to have any effect. Additionaly I sometimes have lines running through my pics. Can somebody help us? Thanks!

Posted by Marcel Wallace on

  • 5 more comments 
  • rb17 Dec 02, 2007

    All my outdoor taken pictures appear completely white on the screen on the back of the camera. Indoor pictures seem ok, though not color balanced very well. Movie function seems to work fine, indoor and outdoor. Does anyone know how to fix the "all-white picture" problem though? I've reset the camera to all the original factory settings, I think.

  • Anonymous Feb 28, 2008

    My outdoor pic's were also overly white, so I tapped on the side of the camera with a hammer, now when I press the button I get shocked. Doesn't seem to be a problem if I where rubber boots.

  • Stuart4pix Mar 23, 2008

    I am having the same problem too. I have the Son Cyber-shot DSC-N2. Indoor photos and video outdoors work fine but cannot do a still shot in the sun!



    Help.

  • Anonymous May 15, 2008

    I have an kodak easyshare c533 . when i turn it on i have a white screen with bits of color. i can read the menu but, cannot see any pictures because the screen is white with streaks across the screen. Don't know what to do.

  • Anonymous Jun 10, 2008

    the picture through the view is good until i take a picture. the picture turns out white.

  • albertcast Aug 08, 2008

    video works, white horiz. lines across jpeg

  • Jadeja Oct 14, 2008

    Whenever I half click the Canon Powershot A410 for a image, It does focus correctly, green rectangles also come, but after full clicking the button, proper image is not captured. White belts are coming over the entire photographs.

    But, I can do video recording very well with the camera.


    I have made all the setting as default, but then also it is giving the same results.

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Anonymous

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It was suggested to my by fuji that it is a bad CCD sensor. I am debating sending it in ($40-100) for repair or just buy a new F40fd for 130...

Posted on Sep 26, 2008

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Okay, i don't know if this will work on all the cameras here. i have a fuji finepix f30 and a fuji f40. i've dropped both,and they both have the same problem. the view before i take the picture is fine, but the shot i take is over-exposed.
what i've done to 'fix' the problem successfully on my f30 is to blow in the battery case with it shut. this works for me about 80% of the time. if it doesn't, i'm successful by turning off the camera, taking out the battery and blowing in the case.
this doesn't work on my f40, which is why i came here, to look for a solution. any ideas out there?

Posted on Aug 06, 2008

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Anonymous

I have the same problem except i still get lines going across indoor pictures ... does anyone know what causes it ?

Posted on Apr 15, 2008

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I think there is no iris on this model. Check the exposure setting. If it set too much, the picture will be overxposed (all white)

Posted on May 22, 2007

Anonymous

I have had the same exact, right down to the bone problem. Photos/stills = overexposed if outside, inside for the most part is normal. Videos are perfect no matter what the lighting condition!

Posted on Mar 12, 2007

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This may be due to jammed iris at fully open. You are over exposing the photographs. if the iris is stucked due to friction a little tappin your camera from side may help you.

Posted on Sep 14, 2006

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bestdarngood

Benjamin Patri

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SOURCE: Overly white pictures

the shutter is defective

Posted on Mar 29, 2008

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Everyone’s eyes see different colors. So there isn’t one setting that is perfect. There are also factors such as is what you are viewing is it a movie that was done on film or is it a movie that was say an animation? Some film stock will have different looks you will have to see kelvin color white levels too if you really want to add to the research. Some films have a yellow hue others are more blue. If it was filmed digitally then it could look better at either depending on the white balance. Bottom line use up the movie go through some settings and then most people just set it and forget it as it will change per movie or tv station.
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The pictures are too blue.

It sounds like a White Balancing problem. I'd guess if it's set on Auto WB, then you'll need to do it manually. Some digital cameras tend to produce that blue tint when left to white balance themselves.

If you don't understand completely let us know the exact model of the camera and I'm sure somebody can talk you through it!
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When I take a picture in p setting it comes out with a blue cast. When taken i automatic, it comes out in correct colors

You didn't specify the model of your camera so I can't be too precise here.
Since it does appear to be a white balance issue, I'd say you've got the white balance set too warm. The camera compensates by adding blue to the scene and hence you get the blue tint. Either set the white balance to match the scene, or else set it to "Auto".
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Having problems with quality of pictures taken inside....they all have a "yellow" color tint to them. Any suggestions? Camera takes excellent outside pictures.

Check your white balance setting. Indoor incandescent bulbs have a yellow color that we normally aren't aware of but shows up in a photo. Usually, when you have your camera set on auto white balance, the camera can correct for it but if it can't, you can set the white balance for tungsten/indoor light.
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TAKING NIGHT SUNSET PICTURES

this is becouse your not setting the "white balance"
up in the camera first,,,some digital cameras have a manual set up for "white balance" what the camera is doing is trying to put the color cast thats in a sun set right so it looks like day light,,,and you wont that color cast in the pitcher to give it that feeling,,,unless you over ride this white balance you will never get the color you are after,,, i use 35 mm film for sun sets
it will wip a digital camera every time here,,
but its horses for corses,good luck with your sun sets,,, but over ride that white balance first if you can
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I am a surgeon when I take pictures of muscle or bloody objects the red color seems to melt and the red is overly saturated and all sharpness and definition to the photo is lost usually taken with a...

The Fuji S2 sensor is noted for this red sensitivity. Here's a few different approaches to getting the shot with the S2, all of which require some experimentation.

1. Set the "Color" and "Tone" Function options to "ORG". Underexpose the shot. Progressively change the exposure compensation downward until when checking the histogram, the red channel does not show saturation at the high end. Advantages: this is the simplest approach to getting the picture. Disadvantages: the S2 already had a fairly limited dynamic range, and this will make things worse for the parts of the photo that are not red. For the surgical setting and use of a ringflash, this may not be much of a disadvantage, since a lot of the stuff of interest will be red, and ringflash illumination generally is of lower contrast than directional lighting.

2. Set the "Color" and "Tone" Function options to "ORG". Use a custom white balance. The idea here is to have the camera adjust the red channel sensitivity itself, and leave the blue and green channels alone. To do this, start with several sheets of white paper and a red or pink marker or highlighter. Scribble with the marker across a sheet, then use that to set a custom white balance. Take a test shot of the red stuff that has been problematic, and see whether the histogram for the red channel shows that there is no saturation at the high end. Repeat this with progressively more red or pink on each sheet used to set the custom white balance until you find the custom white balance that takes enough of the edge off the red channel response. Alternative: I just tried out making a gradient across an 8.5x11" sheet of paper going from white to about 30% red saturation. I can set more or less red adjustment in a custom white balance just by pointing the camera at different parts of the page. This seems to work OK for me. Advantage: can allow the full dynamic range of the sensor to be used. Disadvantages: the experimentation period is likely to take a while to get the best results, and the final images are unlikely to look completely natural.

3. Set the "Color" Function option to "B/W". Use a green or cyan filter on the lens to cut the amount that the red color channel contributes to the final image. Advantages: this is fairly simple as an approach. A similar post-processing technique can be applied to the photos that you already have, by nulling out the red channel contribution and desaturating the blue and green channels to produce a grayscale image. Disadvantages: you lose the color information entirely. Since much of what you want information about is colored red anyway, the organs are likely to appear quite dark when only taking the blue and green channel contributions to the image.

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White Balance

What is White Balance? The human eye captures white as white, red as red and blue as blue, regardless of whether you are outside under the sun or inside under incandescent lighting. Although this is something that we take for granted, the human eye actually adapts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. In reality, when light sources vary, colors caught as the reflection of those light sources also vary. For instance, films for cameras that use film are designed to capture the most appropriate coloring outside under the sun. Thus when you take pictures under incandescent or fluorescent lighting without using a flash, the colors in the resulting picture may seem strange. Digital camera and digital camcorders are equipped with a handy feature called "White Balance" that corrects the changes in color under different light sources, just like the human eye. One of the white balance settings, "Auto White Balance" (AWB) automatically adjusts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. White Balance and Coloring The White Balance feature on Canon digital cameras and camcorders is set to "Auto White Balance" at the time of purchase. If you prefer different coloring, if you want to adjust the coloring more in detail, or if you want to change the coloring on purpose, we recommend that you change the white balance setting.
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White Balance

What is White Balance? The human eye captures white as white, red as red and blue as blue, regardless of whether you are outside under the sun or inside under incandescent lighting. Although this is something that we take for granted, the human eye actually adapts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. In reality, when light sources vary, colors caught as the reflection of those light sources also vary. For instance, films for cameras that use film are designed to capture the most appropriate coloring outside under the sun. Thus when you take pictures under incandescent or fluorescent lighting without using a flash, the colors in the resulting picture may seem strange. Digital camera and digital camcorders are equipped with a handy feature called "White Balance" that corrects the changes in color under different light sources, just like the human eye. One of the white balance settings, "Auto White Balance" (AWB) automatically adjusts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. White Balance and Coloring The White Balance feature on Canon digital cameras and camcorders is set to "Auto White Balance" at the time of purchase. If you prefer different coloring, if you want to adjust the coloring more in detail, or if you want to change the coloring on purpose, we recommend that you change the white balance setting.
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Pictures reddish or orange

Although normal room lights (tungsten lights) appear white to our eyes, their light is actually much "warmer" than daylight, giving a reddish or orange color to pictures. This happens with digital and film cameras. To prevent or lessen this reddish or orange color: If your digital camera has a selectable White Balance mode (check your camera's User's Guide) and you are not using the camera or external flash, set the White Balance mode for "Tungsten" light. If your pictures are reddish even when you use the camera flash or external flash, the room lighting is overpowering the flash. Try setting the White Balance mode for "Tungsten" and continue to use the flash. If your camera does not have a selectable White Balance mode, use the camera flash or external flash when taking pictures in lighting that makes your pictures turn out reddish or orange. If you can, turn down or turn off one of the room lights (without making the room too dark), or move your subject so that it is not being hit directly by the room lights. If you can, when taking pictures in the daytime, try opening any drapes that might be covering windows. Letting in natural daylight improves the color quality of the lighting.
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