Question about Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

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I am shooting with a Nioon D200 and I have to shoot at 100 iso and 1.8 in the shade in the daytime.If I go over 200 all I have it dark pics no matter my f-stop.Is this a camera malfunction.( my friend next to me was also shooting wiht a Nikon and was shooting at 1000 and f8) But if I put my D200 on that exact setting it won't work.

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  • Nikon Master
  • 3,289 Answers

If you're shooting: ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second, it is the same as:
ISO 200, f1.4 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 400, f1.4 @ 1/4000 second, etc.. Because each time you double the ISO value, you need 1/2 the light for a proper exposure. The ISO is the camera sensor (or film) "sensitivity to light". The higher the ISO, the more sensitive it is. That's why in the examples above, the shutter is opened 1/2 as long (or it is twice as fast - whichever you like to look at it). But it doesn't stop there..

That same ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second picture is also the same as:
ISO 100, f2.0 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 100, f2.8 @ 1/1000 second, or
ISO 100, f4.0 @ 1/500 second, etc.. This is because each FULL f-stop (1.4, 2.0, 2.8, 4.0, 5.6, 8.0, 11, 16, 22 and 32) each allow TWICE as much light than the previous (higher f-stop number). f1.4 allows 2x more light than 2.0, which allows 2x more than 2.8 which allows 2x more than 4.0, and so on. So, if you get twice the light from one aperture than the previous full f-stop, and the ISO is the same, then the length of time the shutter is open must be reduced by 1/2. Hence, 1/500 is half as long as 1/1000, which is half as long as /12000, etc.

It can be represented like the exposure triangle below:
I am shooting with a Nioon D200 and I have to - steve_con_96.jpg
All this shows is that all three variables control the exposure. If your main objective is to change the Depth of Field (DoF), adjust Aperture and one or more of the others to get a properly exposed picture. Likewise, if you want to suggest or stop motion, you'd adjust shutter speed first - faster to stop the motion or slower to suggest motion by creating blur. ISO introduces grain to the image. The lower the the ISO value, the finer the grain is (may not even be perceptible). The smoothest color gradients come from the lowest ISO values - but they need to most light. A tripod may be needed unless shooting in direct sunlight or other brightly lit subject. ISO is a lifesaver for poorly lit subjects, night time photography, or other indoor shooting without a tripod or speedlight. The ability to shoot good looking pictures at ISO 3200 means that you need only 1/32 of the light needed when shooting at ISO 100. That means that under the right circumstances, you could hand hold the camera at ISO 3200 when the same picture taken at ISO 100 would take 32x longer. Of course, grain comes into the mix here. It may be too grainy for your likes. Experiment to how high you can set your ISO with acceptable results.

Below is a chart of the full shutter speeds, stops and ISO values. Many cameras break these down further into 1/3 steps for even more minute control. Basically, if you change the value of either shutter speed, f-stop or ISO values 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 - or however many steps - you need to adjust one or both of the others an equivalent amount to compensate to get a properly exposed picture.



Lastly, make sure you haven't set exposure compensation to a negative value. Press and hold the the "+/-" button (has a green dot) on the top panel next to the shutter release button. Spin the rear thumb dial so that it is niether plus or minus. Minus makes the picture dark (underexposed) and Plus makes it brighter (overexposed).

I hope this was helpful and good luck! Please rate my reply - thanks!

Posted on Oct 12, 2011

  • Steve Oct 12, 2011

    Copy and paste this site into your browser for info that will get you up to speed with your D2000 pretty quickly :
    http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d200/us...

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2 Answers

How to take photos indoors without flash


You will have to use a slow shutter speed, which can cause blurring, or a wide aperture, which will cause a narrow depth of focus. You may need to use both.

This can be coped with by using a mini tripod instead of holding the camera by hand, like this

http://gadgetsin.com/uploads/2011/02/camera_tripod_keychain_1.jpg

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I bought this lense and need instant help. I am shooting pics at a high school football game and it gets dark early. What settings do I switch my camera to in order to get sufficient light and capture all...


Shooting sports and the evening can be a compromise between needed s fast shutter to stop action or a longer shutter to allow enough light for a good exposure. Fortunately, you've got a "fast" lens. My suggestions are:

Shoot in "A" mode (aperture priority) and change the aperture of the lens to the lowest number available to make the aperture open to maximum, and increase the ISO to 400 or 800. You may even get satisfactory results at ISO1600, but you should check the results on a computer screen before blindly going out shooting at the level.

By increasing the aperture, two things happen; exposure times are reduced to minimum so that motion is stopped (or blur minimized) and the the depth of field becomes very narrow or "shallow". Depth of field or "DOF" describes the distance in front and beyond the point of focus that will also be in focus. Large apertures (low "f" number s like 1.4 to 2.8 ) = narrow DOF and small apertures (high "f" numbers like 16 to 22 and beyond) = wide DOF. An example would be if you took a picture of someone's face from a2 feet away at f 1.4 and focused on the tip of the nose - the eyes would begin to get soft or out of focus - the ears would be even more noticeable - and that background would very blurred. The same picture at f 22 nearly everything would be in focus - except for maybe the background - depending how far behind it is from the subject's head. Check the example below:

steve_con_4.jpeg
Look at the backgrounds of the pictures above. The left is largely in focus at f 8 while the right is blurry at f 2.5. Had left been shot at f 22 or more, more of the background would be in focus.


Increasing the ISO to 400 or 800 increases the camera's sensitivity to light like film. The higher the ISO, the less time it takes to get a properly exposed picture. High ISO are helpful in low light situations or other times you need to have a faster shutter speed (for sports or don't have a tripod for pictures that need long exposures). Assume you want to take a picture of something that the camera tells you won't be exposed correctly unless you shoot at say for example f 2.8 and shutter is 1/30 second. If the camera ISO was set to 100, you could change it to 200. This doubles the sensitivity to light - meaning you need 1/2 the light; you can change the f number from f 2.8 to f 4, OR, leave it at 2.8 and increase the shutter speed to the next faster value 1/60 sec. If you change the ISO to 400, it is now 4x's sensitive than 100 (or 2x's than 200). At ISO 400, you could go two f stops smaller to f 5.6 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/125. For ISO 800, you could go three f stops smaller to f 8 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/250. You can mix and match, too. Go one up on the speed and two smaller on the aperture. The drawback to higher ISOs is that the pictures become grainier with each increase. Eventually, the pictures don't look good when you get into ISO numbers above 800 (or less on some DSLR cameras - and even less on point and shoot types). You have to experiment to find where your preferences are. See below for Low and High ISO comparison shots:

steve_con_86.jpg
The left picture above has nice, smooth transitions between shades of colors - the right picture has a grainy appearance called "noise". Some is acceptable but others are not - it depends what YOU can live with. Sometimes it's better to have a grainy shot than nothing at all.

Lastly, you can shoot "S" for shutter mode, to control motion instead of "A" which controls volume of light instead. The same principles apply.

I hope this helps & good luck!

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1 Answer

How do I set the Iso and flash


ISO is the sensitivity to light. The lower numbers 80, 100, 200 are the LEAST sensitive (but provide the best looking pictures). Sensitivity has to do with the amount of light needed to properly expose an image. ISO is a part of exposure that works with Aperture (f stop) and shutter speed (in seconds - or fractional seconds). Here's how it looks:

steve_con_63.jpg

The graphic above shows that varying either of these three values changes the exposure. If you change one by one step, you have to change one of the others by one step to get about the same exposure result. Each of the step values on your camera for the shutter, aperture and ISO is twice as much as the previous value. ISO 1600 is 2x ISO 800, which is 2x ISO 400, and 2x ISO 200 and finally, 2x ISO 100 (some cameras go to ISO 50 or less!).

The shutter works the same way: 1/1000 is 2x faster than 1/500, and 2x 1/125, and 2x 1/60, and 2 x 1/30, etc. These are easy to see the how each is twice as much as the other.

Finally, the aperture. Each "f stop" allows 2x as much light as the previous value. f2 lets 2x as much light as f2.8, which lets in 2x as much as f4, etc. I know the number don't double like you would expect, and the smaller numbers allow more light (you'd think it was the other way around) - but it's because we're talking about a circular lenses and it has to do with how we calculate area of a circle (3.14 x R squared). It may be easier to recall small numbers = equal large openings by thinking of f numbers with a "1/" over them - like this: 1/f1.4, or 1/f2, 1/f2.8, etc. Here's a chart that shows how aperture and shutter speed work together at one ISO setting.

steve_con_64.jpg

Read them across, the top line shows that 1/250 @ f1.4 is the SAME as 1/125 @ f2.0, which is also the SAME as shooting 1/60 @ 2.8, etc. If you were to increase the by one step, the shutter speeds would increase by a factor of two. Twice as much light by opening the aperture by a single stop means you must halve the exposure time or halve the ISO value. Likewise, if it's too dark to get a decent picture; increase exposure time or ISO value to capture enough light.

Assume a properly exposed picture requires 1/30 of a second at f5.6 with ISO 200. If the camera was increased by one step to ISO 400, you can take the picture a f5.6 still but in 1/60 sec - greatly reducing the chance of blur from holding the camera in you hand. You could even go up one more step to ISO 400 and shoot in 1/125 sec, which would reduce the blur even more. Fast shutter speeds reduce the "camera shake" and stop motion in sports photography - or other moving objects. If you had the camera set up on a tripod, you could dial the ISO down to ISO 100 and shoot at 1/30 of a sec at f5.6. If your lens can open up to f4, you can shoot in half the time because the lens is letting in twice the light. Some point and shoot cameras don't allow changing f stops or even shutter speeds - so all you can do it raise and lower ISO.

Which camera and flash do you have?

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1 Answer

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1 Answer

I would just like to find out how to set aperture when shooting in manual mode


The REBEL is Either aperture or shutter priority.

You can set this up via the menu

There is a rule of thumb and it also depends on the ISO ( ASA or film speed) iF IN LOW LIGHT USE A HIGHER ISO say 200-1000

and an aperture set from ap ring on lens a good all round setting is F8

the rule for Apertures is smaller the number larger the aperture ( lets more light in, but in high iso settings you really dont need to change this unless its really dark,

Larger the number smaller the aperture used for very bright light conditions, where over exposure is likely to occur ( even in flash )

Flash automatically uses F8 but this is not always ideal as when shooting in some lights at a white object ( wedding) the pic will be overexposed , sometimes its better to use F11 with a flash and an ISO of 100. Perhaps you need to get an easy photo guide book Digital Photogreaphy for Dummies ( no insult intended) It has a lot of these little tips in it and will improve your pics beyond "Happy Snaps"

Changing the exposure is to use the aperture ring on the lense most are from F2-F22 depending on the focal length of the lens say 50 mm 150mm - 200mm for each size lens one would increase the F stop by 1 or add and EV point (+01) to compensate for the length.

Hope that is helpful for you

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1 you stay in automatic mode and take yor photos with a tripod.
2 you put your camera in speed pririty, with the good speed, and try not to moove during the shoot (you can put your camera on something stable)
3 you tune up the iso
4 2+3

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x250 means flash synch speed is set to 1/250.  Is your speedlight connected or is you on-camera flash up?

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1 Answer

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