Tip & How-To about Graphite-50 Anti-Seize Anti-seize Compounds

Don't use anti-seize lubricant on suspension parts!

I've seen numerous videos of u-tubers using anti-seize lubricant on their suspension after replacing items like the inner & outer tie rod ends and brake parts.

The product is not made for that purpose and you could be risking someone's life by using a lubricant on parts meant to be torqued tightly to prevent them from coming apart. You really don't want these automotive parts coming apart easily!

Anti-seize lubricant came out in the late '70's for HEI (high energy ignitions) and was for the spark plugs used on aluminum cylinder heads. Todays spark plugs usually don't require the lubricant and some manufacturers recommend against using the lubricant since it can cause you to have too much torque applied to the spark plug when installing, leading to stripped threads!

Good luck,
Stan

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i can't get the left outer tie rod end to screw off why?

Oxygen and Acetylene is ideal but MAP GAS or Propane can be used. They just take longer to get red. Getting the part hot will expand the metal but turning the threaded area red will dissolve rust build up. Don't try to spin the part immediately. With two pairs of large pipe wrenches or two large vice grips. Rock the threads back and forth repeatedly. 6-8x will usually work the rust away and allow the tie rod to be spun off. Cranking and turning the tie rod in one direction sometimes causes the rust to build up and seize the threads again. Because of tolerances you may need to wait for the part to cool down before the threads will start to move. Hope this helps. Good Luck.
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have anyone out there ever change inner tie rods on a1995 honda odyssey?,if so simply explain,THANKS

Procedure on replacing the inner tie rod ends:


1) Raise and safely support the vehicle.

2) Remove the front wheel/tire assembly.

3) Clean the steering rod between the steering boot and outer tie rod end lock nut with a suitable penetrating lubricant and a clean cloth or shop towel.

4) Loosen the outer tie rod end locking nut 1/8 turn.

5) Loosen the steering boot clamp(s), and slide the small clamp off the boot.

6) Carefully loosen the boot and slide outward off the steering rack and onto the shaft to expose the inner steering rod mounting fastener.

7) If necessary, position the inner steering rack shaft in or out to allow for additional access.

8) Relieve the steering rod nut locking tab from the inner steering rack shaft, then loosen the steering rod ball socket nut 1 turn.

9) Matchmark the tie rod end to the threaded shaft.

10) Remove the cotter key and castle nut from the outer tie rod end threaded spindle, and using a tie rod end removal tool, remove the tie rod from the steering knuckle.

11) Hold the tie rod with a wrench, and remove the outer tie rod end from the threaded rod, counting the number of complete turns it takes to remove the tie rod end from the shaft. Write the number of turns on a piece of note paper.

12) Remove the tie rod end lock nut from the threaded steering shaft.

13) Slide the steering rack boot off the shaft.

14) Remove the inner steering rod ball socket nut from the inner steering rack shaft.

To install:

1) Inspect the tie rod end for looseness, and the steering rack boot and tie rod end boot for cracks deterioration or damage and replace as necessary.

2) Clean steering rack shaft and apply a light coating of Genuine Honda Power steering fluid as necessary.

3) Apply a medium strength locking agent to the threads where the inner steering rod ball socket mounts. Use a new locking washer and a new stop washer, and install the inner tie rod onto the steering rack shaft.

4) Tighten the inner tie rod end fastener by 58 ft. lbs. (78 Nm)

5) Peen the lock washer over the nut or onto the flat surface of the steering rack shaft.

6) Apply silicone grease to the outer circumference of the inner tie rod end ball socket, and onto the groove just outside of the socket.

7) Apply silicone grease to the inside of the small end of the steering rack boot, and slide the boot over the steering shaft and onto the rack and install the boot clamps. If the boot has air hose fittings make sure they are installed as removed.

8) Apply a light film of an anti-seize compound onto the threaded tie rod end, and install the tie rod end lock nut.

9) Install the tie rod end onto the tie rod, turning it in exactly the number of turns it took to remove it.

10) Install the tie rod end following the tie rod end installation procedure.

11) The balance of installation is the reverse of the removal procedure.

12) Check the front end alignment and adjust as necessary.
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i have rubbing on the inside of my drivers side front tire, the passenger tire is fine. normally i would think this was an alignment issue but only the one tire i have a problem with. The ware is on the section of the tire where the driving surface meets the wall of the tire. the only other thing i can think of is possibly a suspension issue, but I'm not sure and I'm not sure which part of the suspension to look at replacing first. I also have a clunking in the front end when i'm turning a corner or when turning the well at all. Any Ideas?

What you describe is most often caused by a bad tie-rod end, which is part of your steering. This causes the clunking that you feel when you turn, and the tire wear.
Jack up the front drivers side and when the wheel is off the ground, try to force it left and right. If you feel any play in it, a tie rod end is bad.
To find out if it is the inner or outer tie rod end, look underneath and locate the tie rod for that wheel- it will look like a pole about an inch thick. Get somebody to move the wheel left and right like you did, and look on either end of the tie rod for which end is moving. That will be your bad tie rod end. The "outer" is the one by the wheel- the other one is the "inner". Most often it is the outer tie rod end that goes bad.
It is important to get a bad tie rod end replaced as soon as possible because it can separate and cause you to lose control of your car when the wheel will suddenly turn either in or out, depending on which way you are steering when it fails. After a tie rod end is replaced, your car will need an alignment to set the adjustment correctly. If you are changing it yourself, mark how far the old one is threaded in so your alignment will be fairly close to where it was.
Good luck, and Thank You for using FixYa!
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inner tie rod removal

The first step in replacing the inner tie rod is to remove the tie rod end. It's basically a three step process, where you start by loosening the jam nut that's used to set the alignment (toe-in or toe-out). That jam nut determines how far up the inner tie rod the tie rod end is fixed. The tie rod end is hollow and threaded, so it can be screwed on or off the inner tie rod. Any procedure for removing a tie rod will start by telling you to count the turns you unscrew the tie rod end, something that I didn't do, and I'll save the explanation for the end:-) After you loosen the jam nut, you remove the cotter pin from the post on the outer tie rod ball joint, and unscrew the nut that holds the ball joint into the tapered fitting on the steering knuckle (video to right). After you pop the outer tie end free of the steering knuckle, you can unscrew the tie rod end. from the inner tie rod, but you need to grip it with something. Inner tie rods normally have some flat surfaces or a splined surface for grabbing with pliers. In this case, I needed two pairs of visegrips and a clamp to hold the visegrips on the inner tie rod from moving in order to get the outer tie rod end broken free and turning easy. That video is below. I happen to own the shop manuals for my Dodge Omni, so I was able to study the procedure for replacing the inner tie rod in detail. I didn't follow it for a couple reason. First, they show my type of power steering rack (Saginaw vs TRW) needs to be removed from the car to change the inner tie rod. That's a lot of extra work, not to mention the fact I buried one of the crossmember bolts in my unibody and flooring repair! So I went with an inner tie rod removal kit from Harbor Freight, manufactured by U.S. General (in Taiwan). The tool is very simple, basically a large steel tub with a snap in opening for a large crows foot insert on one end and a 1/2" socket drive on the other end. The kit is shown in the photo to the lower left (which I need to replace), and a video of the procedure is shown below. The kit wasn't quite right for my car, I had to use an oversized crows foot and the ball joint housing on the inner tie rod was too long, so the flats on the housing were barely held with the crows foot positioned by hand at the very end of the tool. But I got it out.
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