20 Most Recent Jump Start 4' Fluorescent Plant Grow Light System Questions & Answers


There are three major types of lighting systems available right now: incandescent, fluorescent, and high intensity discharge. Incandescent lights are horribly inefficient (especially the screw-in "grow bulb" type) and really not an acceptable option for plant growth. Although they are inexpensive to purchase, their cost of operation makes them the costliest source of light.

Jump Start 4'... | Answered on Nov 08, 2017


That depends on what you're trying to grow and what phase the plant is in. Certain plants are adapted to grow in the shade or in warm, sunny environments. Depending on the plant, one type of light may work better than another. For example, if your plant needs a shadier environment, then a regular incandescent bulb may work best.

The other factor that goes into choosing the right grow light is what phase your plant is at. For example, a high-pressure sodium bulb may be best when your plant is in the flowering or fruiting stage.

Personally, I love using LED grow lights. Modern LED bulbs are more energy-efficient (they produce more light with less power), so they cost less in the long run. They also produce less heat, which means you don't have to worry about a ventilation system. Plus, they emit light wavelengths that correspond to the peak absorption peaks for most plants.

When choosing your bulb, you should look at the requirements of the plant and how those requirements change as the plant continues to grow. Keep in mind that the larger your plant gets, the more light it will need, so plan ahead.

Jump Start 4'... | Answered on Nov 08, 2017


Please elaborate "jump start".

I'd begin by checking battery voltage first, then fuses, and ignition switch for power.

Jump Start... | Answered on Mar 28, 2019


Hi try a new plug you're old one could b breaking down under load also give the carby a clean:::::: blow out the Jets inside Especially THE MAIN JET ::::; IF A MOTOR STARTS & WONT KEEP RUNNING ITS A GOOD SIGN THE MAIN JET IS BLOCKED.,,,.. Cheers

Garden | Answered 7 hours ago


Few 2-stroke engines produced in these modern times aren't exhaust tuned which means it is difficult to test the compression pressure with any accuracy at cranking or starting speed - most are exhaust tuned so a much greater power output can be produced from a small and lightweight engine. Peak compression happens at the engine speed when the reflected exhaust pressure wave effectively blocks the exhaust port. At this point the engine capacity grows, the compression ratio increases and the power output increases.

I don't know what the compression pressure should be but I would be slightly worried if it was less than about 90 psi and expect to find a reading of 100/120 psi. As it is a twin, the real test will be the difference between the cylinder pressures which theoretically should be identical though for practical purposes a variation of about 10/20 psi would be acceptable.

The best test of engine condition is how it starts, runs and sounds. When considering a 2-stroke engine it is important not to forget there is also compression under the piston. Sometimes after wintering unused a previously good machine will be down on power and difficult to start. It should not be ignored how if the crankshaft oil seals have lost flexibility, air could be drawn past them into the crankcase reducing the quality of the induction through the carb.

Garden | Answered 13 hours ago


See the videos. No one knows who makes a 'T 1200' except you.

https://www.google.com/search?q=drive+belt+on+my+lawn+tractor+broke%2C+a+T+1200

The correct search queries would be

make model drive belt diagram

then look at the images tab.

or

make model replace drive belt

and look at the Video tab.

Garden | Answered Yesterday


Make sure that the deck parts move freely. That the blades and/or bearings or pulleys anr not siezed or blocked. Also you might adjust your carb just a little in air/fuel mixture and idle rpm.

Garden | Answered 3 days ago


Not sure about the fuel/oil ratio. Modern 2-stroke engines are designed to run with less oil due to concerns about pollution and 50:1 isn't unusual. That was the recommendation for my strimmer but I added a little extra oil to maybe 30 or 40:1 and it gave good service for 30 seasons.

The fashion for anti-pollution measures also spread to the fuelling of small engines especially in some areas. In this case the fuel/air adjustments are either hidden behind plastic or metal plugs or deleted from the carb altogether.
If there are no screws it is a preset type and if dismantling and a thorough clean doesn't restore performance it is reasonable to make one of two assumptions (or maybe both) - either the carb is faulty in some way (diaphragm perhaps) or the crankshaft seals are failing and allowing air into the crankcase preventing a good induction.
It isn't unknown for a small 2-strokes to perform well all season and then be next to useless after standing idle all winter. If this is the case it is worth suspecting those seals have lost flexibility...

Garden | Answered on May 27, 2020


I don't think so. Adjusting the high and low on carburetor is a thing in the past.

Garden | Answered on May 26, 2020

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