20 Most Recent Jenn-Air Electric Single Oven Questions & Answers


could be a faulty thermal sensor..

Jenn-Air... | Answered on Oct 28, 2017


What you need to check is for power at the clock.TURN OFF BREAKER gain access to clock and use volt meter. One the clock will be wires maked L1 & N on those 2 wires when breaker is turned back on their should be 120 vac. IF 120 vac at those 2 wires,replace the clock, if not 120 vac into clock check for burnt/broken wires

Jenn-Air... | Answered on Feb 07, 2015


Hello,

these units have a door hinge issue, 99% of the time the hinges will fix the issue. Check the hinge receptacles the part the hinges lock into they often will go bad at the same time.

Order the hinges and replace them it will fix the problem. The link below is where we get our parts from.

Cheap Appliance parts

Good luck with your repair.

http://www.appliancerepairlesson.com/

Jenn-Air... | Answered on Mar 05, 2011


Here are some juicy pearls of appliantology wisdom from our friends at Maytag for understanding F1 fault codes. This code is the same for several makes and models of ranges. In some models, there are subcodes that make diagnosis even easier. Here's a simple explanation of what's going on and how to troubleshoot:
The F1 code indicates that:
a. The electronic range control (ERC) is sensing heat in the oven when in a time-of-day (i.e., not cooking) mode or
b. The ERC is receiving information to run multiple heat functions simultaneously.
Although different components (depending upon the model) could generate the code, simple and straightforward testing using your ohm meter is all you gotta do to test for it.
1. Check the oven temperature sensor. The oven sensor gotsta be within spec or it will cause the F1 code. As an example of being out-of-spec, the ERC will generate an F1 fault code when the sensor shows 1650 ohms during a time-of-day mode. This is equivalent to 350°F in the oven. The resistance isn't high enough to generate an F2 code (runaway temp) or an F3 or F4 code (shorted/open sensor circuit). The ERC monitors the sensor circuit after a heat cycle and expects the resistance to drop back to 1050-1100 ohms. The fault code is generated when this doesn't happen. Checking the sensor circuit means also checking the harness, harness connections and the sensor itself.
2. If the oven sensor circuit checks okay, then turn your inquisitive eyeballs to the touchpad. If the range has a separate touchpad/keyboard, the keypad may have moisture that is shorting several circuits simultaneously. If the F1 code is given immediately (instead of during or after a heat cycle), remove the ribbon connector from the touchpad to the ERC after clearing the F1 code. If the F1 code does not return in five minutes, then cast a suspicious gaze upon the touchpad/keyboard. Shorts may be caused by using an ammonia-based glass cleaner. The touchpad surface will absorb ammonia-based cleaners that are sprayed directly on the glass surface. When heat is applied, the surface material can break down causing shorts. If you're gonna use ammonia-based cleaners on your control panel, then you should spray it on the rag and then wipe the touchpanel -don't spray directly onto the surface of the touchpad.
3. On Amana ranges with a rotary temperature dial, be sure that the knob is in the OFF position when performing tests.
4. If these tests all check good, then replace the ERC.

Jenn-Air... | Answered on Mar 02, 2011


Usually this means it is burned out. I do not recommend messing about with elements as they are connected to the mains supply and if they are not installed correctly or worked on whilst power is not isolated, they can be very dangerous.

You would need a ohm meter to measure the element which will have a really low resistance. If is has a high resistance it is faulty, if it has a low resistance, it is likely the thermostat as this is the part that powers the element up and turns the power off when the required temperature is reached.

Jenn-Air... | Answered on Feb 06, 2011


Hi,


Before you go working too hard to get you oven to go into the self clean mode(self destruct)....check out this tip...

Self Cleaning Oven Problem


heatman101

" Wish I had read this first. I never would have used the self cleaning option. Thanks for the info!!

Jenn-Air... | Answered on Dec 13, 2010


Hi,

The hinges and receivers would need to be replaced on this. The hinges are part number 71003351 you need 2, they go inside the door, so the door would need disassembled.

The receivers (hinge receptacles)are part number 71002206 you need 2 also, these go on the side of the oven. You will need to pull the oven out a few inches to gain access to these

Jenn-Air... | Answered on Jul 24, 2010


There are a few Jenn-Air models. Can you please add the Jen-AIr model # in comments?

Jenn-Air Ovens | Answered on Nov 01, 2020


Hi

If you have connected correctly and the ribbon cable is also fine then it seems that the touch pad is bad and should be replaced. Hope this helps...please post back for further assistance.

Daniel

Jenn-Air Ovens | Answered on Apr 15, 2019

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