20 Most Recent Canon PowerShot A620 Digital Camera - Page 7 Questions & Answers


Simply right click on the track itself and select send to/DVD-RW or CR-RW depending on the type Compact disc drive you have. Then you will see a notification, "you files to be written to CD." Simply click on it or go to your Compact disc drive on My Computer and click “write these files to CD.” Then follow the screen instructions. IT is that simple. All you need to do is press and release the display button until the screen displays. Usually Canon Powershot cameras have 3 display modes:- colour, black & white, blank. Your camera is set to blank that is why you cannot see any image/screen displays no image. Just press and release the display button until the screen displays. That should do it.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 19, 2009


A stuck shutter is another common failure mode for digital cameras. The symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open).

To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see this link for further info and a simple fix that may help.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 19, 2009


from cardrecovery.com..

alot of people encounters this prob... hope this will help u.. but im not sure if it will fix the problem..

but again 9sure u already did this) check the slide or card rotection of ur card, then check also the slot on the cam where u put the card -- there was a thread about this , like u can pick it with papaer clips blah blah not sure how he did it, it worked for him but i dont advise it bec pis are very sensitive so just dont do it...

here is it... solution from cardrecovery

Troubleshoot:

Memory card is used by digital camera to store the photos it takes. Popular memory cards include SD card, CF card, xD-Picture card and Memory stick. For some reasons, memory card may get damaged on power shortage, or removal of memory card on picture shooting or viewing, or other various and unknown reasons. Usually, you will see error message like "memory card error", "card locked", "card error", or an error code on your camera screen and the valuable pictures on the memory card could disappear and be lost. Some cases, your camera or Windows may prompt you to re-format the memory card and refuse to take new pictures or view old pictures.

Solution:

Once you have your memory card damaged, it is highly recommended to stop further operations on the memory card (e.g. taking new pictures, or delete, format the memory card). Data recovery software like "CardRecovery" is able to recover the lost pictures in most cases.

First, you need to confirm your memory card can appear as a drive letter in "My Computer", which will allow recovery software to access and recover the lost photos. You may try to connect your digital camera to your computer, if a new drive letter appears in "My Computer", it is OK. Otherwise, you need to prepare a USB card reader. There are many card readers available in market (e.g. SanDisk and Kingston). You can buy one from Amazon or BestBuy.


Then, you may download and install CardRecovery to your computer. Launch it from Start Menu -> Programs -> CardRecovery. You select the drive letter of your memory card, and destination folder for save the recovered files. CardRecovery will scan your memory card and locate the recoverable pictures. The process is quick and easy. Usually it takes less than 15 minutes.

Can I re-use the corrupted memory card?

For data protection, CardRecovery performs read only operation on your memory card and it does not change the data on the memory card, so it does not repair or fix the memory card. If you need, AFTER you have recovered your lost photos from the card, you may try to format the memory card before re-use. It is suggested to perform enough read/write test before using it again to take new pictures. If you are worrying that the memory card is unstable and may cause further data loss, purchase and use a new memory card. Your valuable and irreplaceable photos are more important than memory card. Memory card is very cheap. A new 2GB SD, CF or xD card is less than $10.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 13, 2009


A stuck shutter is another common failure mode for digital cameras. The symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open).

To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see this link for further info and a simple fix that may help.

Make sure that you read the reader's comments there for other techniques that may work if the outlined steps in the article don't. Also, please leave a comment there on how the fixes worked, or may not have worked for you.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 10, 2009


Hi...

If your card is locked try to remove the card. See if there is a small button there and slide it to unlock the card. Put your card back to your DG cam.


Good luck.

Regards
PCmania

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 09, 2009


There is a company in new york that carries a parts for small point& shoot digital cameras, : Camera Repair NYC

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Aug 29, 2009


The A620 came out in 2005, before the SDHC (high capacity) protocol had been introduced. The A580 came out in 2008 and is compatible with the SDHC protocol. The A620 is only compatible with the SD protocol, and maximum capacity under this protocol is 2MB.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Aug 28, 2009


Canon doesn't typically publish information regarding the top capacity for memory cards, especially since new cards come out all the time and they'd have to continually rewrite their manuals.


I would, however, suggest getting a couple of 2gb cards instead of a single 4gb card. Not only is there less of a question of compatibility with 2gb cards, but if you misplace one, you still have a backup. A 2gb card will hold several hundred shots at full resolution and the lowest compression, so you won't have to worry about running out of space.

Hope this helps!

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Aug 21, 2009


Use a cardreader to download your pictures.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Aug 13, 2009


You need to start the "Canon Camera Access Library 8" service. To do this (on XP, other Windows OSes are similar) you need to:
1. Right-click on "My Computer" and select "Manage"
2. Click the + sign in front of "Services and Applications"
3. Click on "Services"
4. Right-click on "Canon Camera Access Library 8" and select "Start"

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Aug 13, 2009


Did you check the display option? The camera allow you to turn OFF the screen.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Aug 11, 2009


You can turn on/off the digital zoom. While on shooting mode, press MENU button and go to left end tab menu items. Navigate to "Digital Zoom" and select the desired¡red setting: ON or OFF. Remember that digital zoom can't be used if the screen is turned off.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Aug 07, 2009


I also own an A620, but unfortunately I also learned the hard way that SDHC cards are not compatible with this camera. The A620 was designed before the newer SDHC format came out, thus although they look exactly the same, your camera will never work with these cards. Your camera uses standard SD cards (2GB or less). There are some standard 4GB SD cards, but they are very rare these days, and costly.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Aug 06, 2009


I took a hammer to the shutter - now it opens! Actually, I tried the suggestion and it did not correct the problem. I guess I will have to get a new camera. Very disappointed as this camera is only four years old and well cared for.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Aug 03, 2009


Sounds like you might have accidentally pressed the DISPLAY button on the back of your camera. It turns the screen on and off to save batteries. Turn on your camera, and press this button once again to turn the screen back on.

But if your camera is also taking black pictures,
a stuck shutter is another common failure mode for digital cameras. The symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open).

To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see this link for further info and a simple fix that may help.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Jul 30, 2009


If the camera shows the menu, it can be two faults - dead CCD or stuck shutter. You should contact local Canon service center.

Tom

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Jul 28, 2009


Think that you accidentally pressed the DISP or DISPLAY button on the back of your camera. This manually turns the LCD display on and off to save batteries. You would then use the optical viewfinder in its place. To turn the screen back on, just press the DISP button one more time.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Jul 25, 2009


A stuck shutter is another common failure mode for digital cameras. The symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open).

To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see this link for further info and a simple fix that may help.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Jul 24, 2009


Check your owner / user manual. I had similar problem and it was caused by "Mode" and "Flash" settings.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Jul 24, 2009

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