20 Most Recent Canon PowerShot A620 Digital Camera - Page 6 Questions & Answers


Go in to you camera set up and find where you can turn on or off the "sound" when taking a picture.(find the instructions in your manual) Some people want the camera silent when taking pictures so as not to disturb other people.
If that is already "on" then you probably have a bad speaker. But if it does not affect the performance of the camera, don't worry about it.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Dec 19, 2009


Press "Func Set". Scroll up or down to "Drive Mode". Scroll to the right to the icon showing "10" for 10 seconds (the other is 2 seconds). Press "Func Set again.
Put the camera on a table or chair. Press the shutter, and get in the picture!!!

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Dec 12, 2009


Use a card reader instead of your camera.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Nov 29, 2009


Raise the ISO setting on the camera, make sure you are holding the camera still and pressing the button, not punching the trigger and shaking the camera.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Nov 21, 2009


A stuck shutter is another common failure mode for digital cameras. The symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open).

To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see this link for further info and a simple fix that may help.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Nov 07, 2009


Some cameras cannot handle over 2GB memory cards. If it works fine with 2GB card - stick to that. If some other A620 you know operates with 4GB card, take yours to repairs.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 24, 2009


All SD (and SDHC) cards have a locking switch on them and this can be activated accidentally when handling the SD card.

Remove the SD card and slide the switch on it away from the lock position. If this does not work or if the switch is already in the correct position, then slide it all the way to lock and then fully back again.

If this fails then you have a faulty SD card and must replace it. Dirty electrical contacts do not result in a card locked message so you won't have to worry about those but as with all memory cards never touch the contacts unless they clearly need cleaning. Note that if you have to replace the memory card you can use regular SD cards up to 4GB and SDHC cards which start at 4Gb rising to 16GB maximum. The camera slows down when using SDHC above 8GB though.

I hope that you have found my answer to be of use and in return I ask only that you rate my answer.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 22, 2009


Most new 4GB and larger cards are SDHC cards (look on the card). Although they look exactly the same as a standard SD card, they are not. Unfortunately, there is no way that these cards will work with your camera, as it was designed before the SDHC format came out. As you've dsicovered, 2GB and less are standard SD cards, and will work with your camera.

There were a few standard 4GB cards produced a few years ago, most notably by ADATA (I have one that I use in my A620). Unfortunately, these are rare now, and are somewhat expensive if found on eBay.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 20, 2009


First of all, the 4GB card will never be able to work in your camera. Check on its face. It likely says SDHC, and SDHC cards as this format came out after your camera was designed (I know it looks exactly like a normal SD card, but it's not).

Now the 2GB card should work with your camera as it is a standard SD card. Remove the card from your camera. Look on the side of the card for the tiny slide switch, and slide it to the other "unlocked" position. Reinsert it in the camera, and see if that corrects the problem.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 19, 2009


there is no "bar graph" to show you battey condition. However, it will warn you when they are getting low. You can still take many pictures with after low bat. indicators are flashing. You can take like 300 pics. with the camera.
I spent a week in on vacation & took 100's of pics. & looked at them later, on the same set of batteries (Not rechargeable bat. either).

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 09, 2009


The date stamp only works in "Postcard" resolution. Press the Func Set button, then scroll down to the bottom to select postcard resolution.
Then press the menu button. The date time stamp selection should now work. Simply turn it on.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Oct 03, 2009


You need to clean the contacts inside the battery compartment. Do this with a Q-Tip swab dampened in rubbing alcohol. It would be good to clean the battery and the charger also. Thank you,Dana

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 29, 2009


if ur very sure that the battery is fully charged... first we would advice you to change the batteries and see ...... if that doesnt work... the battery contacts may be corroded or bent and hence not making correct contact with the battery
.... sometimes there cud be dust or sand particles in the lens retraction passage... blow out air in those places..... this cud help a great deal.... I was able to fix a similar problem by wiggling the outermost part of the lens.as its trying to go in....
also try Place the camera flat on its back on a table, pointed at the ceiling. Press and hold the shutter button down, and at the same time press the power-on button. The idea is that the camera will try to autofocus while the lens is extending, hopefully seating the lens barrel guide pins in their slots.
if that doest help
Remove the batteries, then remove the memory card. Then install the new batteries, when you turn it on it should come back to life. turn it off, slip in the memory card and turn it on one last time.
if that doesnt help

Insert the cameras Audio/Video (AV) cable, and turn the camera on. Inserting this cable ensures that the camera's LCD screen remains off during the start process. Thus extra battery power is available to the camera's lens motor during startup. This extra power can be useful in overcoming grit or sand particals that may be jamming the lens. If the AV cable doesn't fix the lens error by itself, consider keeping this cable installed while trying the above fixes and 7 as a means to provide extra help to these fixes. But note that I DON'T recommend keeping the cable installed during Fix 6 as you may damage the AV port while tapping the camera. Reinsert the cable only AFTER tapping the camera.



Now we're entering into the realm of potentially damaging your camera in conducting the fix. There is definitely some risk here, so take care when conducting the following two fixes.
Fix #6: Repeatedly tap the padded/rubber usb cover on a hard surface with the intent of dislodging any particles that may be jamming the lens. Other variations include hitting a side of the camera against the palm of your hand. A lot of people have reported success with this method. HOWEVER, there is also some potential for damaging or dislodging internal components with this method, such as unseating ribbon cables, or cracking LCD screens.

Fix #7: Try forcing the lens. More people have reported success with this method than with any of the other methods. HOWEVER, there's obviously some potential for damaging your camera by using this method. Variations include gently pulling, rotating, and/or twisting the lens barrel while hitting the power button. Attempt to gently straighten or align the barrel if it's crooked or twisted. Another variation includes looking for uneven gaps around the lens barrel, and then pushing on the side of the lens barrel that has the largest gap (note pushing the lens barrel all the way in is NOT recommended as it may become stuck there). While doing any of the above, listen for a click that indicates that the lens barrel guide pins may have reseated in their guide slots. If you hear this click, immediately stop and try the camera.


regards
iversh

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 27, 2009


Iwould hve sid the same thing Rule out the shutter, I do not mean to play copy cat here but I am just rather confirming your diagnosis and a very good one at that you should join fixya as a expert.

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/edwy_1a56970cf1ea4620

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 23, 2009


A stuck shutter is another common failure mode for digital cameras. The symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open).

To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see this link for further info and a simple fix that may help.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 19, 2009


A stuck shutter is a common failure mode for digital cameras. The symptoms of a stuck or "sticky" shutter are very similar to CCD image sensor failure. The camera may take black pictures (for shutter stuck closed), or the pictures may be very bright and overexposed, especially when taken outdoors (for shutter stuck open).

To confirm a stuck shutter, put the camera in any mode other than "Auto", and turn the flash OFF (you don't want to blind yourself for the next step). Next look down the lens and take a picture. You should see a tiny flicker in the center of the lens as the shutter opens and closes. If no movement is seen, then you likely have a stuck shutter. If so, please see this link for further info and a simple fix that may help.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 19, 2009


If it's working using the external power input, then it's likely a problem with either the batteries, or the battery terminals (they may need cleaned or "bent up" a little to make better connection).

Here are some simple things to try for a camera that won't power on. They won't work for every case, but they're worth a try.

Canon PowerShot... | Answered on Sep 19, 2009

Not finding what you are looking for?
Canon PowerShot A620 Digital Camera Logo

219 questions posted

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Canon Cameras Experts

old marine
old marine

Level 3 Expert

2279 Answers

Ekse

Level 3 Expert

13434 Answers

Poul Brinchs Larsen

Level 2 Expert

159 Answers

Are you a Canon Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

View Most Popular

PowerShot Canon

  • PowerShot Canon

Most Popular Question

trying buy new memory card will not work

  • Cameras
Loading...